Tagged: Legal Profession

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FAN 160.1 (First Amendment News) Ballard Spahr and Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz to Merge

Press ReleaseAm Law 100 firm Ballard Spahr and Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz (LSKS)—the preeminent First Amendment and media law boutique in the United States—announced today that they have agreed to merge effective October 1, 2017. The powerhouse combination, which will retain the name Ballard Spahr, brings together two nationally renowned media law practices and creates a team that represents the biggest and most prominent names in the industry.

All 25 of LSKS’s lawyers, including all four of its name partners—Lee Levine, Michael D. Sullivan, Elizabeth C. Koch, and David A. Schulz—will join Ballard Spahr in its Washington, D.C., New York, Philadelphia, and Denver offices. LSKS is well known for its deep bench of top-tier First Amendment attorneys. Its lawyers, including Mr. Levine—who has been described in Chambers USA as “the greatest First Amendment attorney in the United States”—have argued landmark cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and in state and federal courts across the country.

Mark S. Stewart (Ballard Spahr) 

“We have made one outstanding addition after another to our Media and Entertainment Law Group—including Practice Leaders David Bodney and Chuck Tobin, who are recognized as among the very best in the business,” said Ballard Spahr Chair Mark Stewart. “With the arrival of LSKS, we will have one of the largest practices of its kind in the country. The LSKS lawyers are terrific people whose dedication to this critically important work mirrors ours. It is an exciting development for both firms.”

Media attorneys at Ballard Spahr and LSKS represent and counsel clients across platforms and industry sectors—news, entertainment, sports, publishing, advertising, and advocacy. They defend media clients in defamation, privacy, and First Amendment litigation; prosecute actions to secure open government and public access; defend journalists against civil, criminal, and grand jury subpoenas; advise reporters in their newsgathering; provide prepublication and prebroadcast counseling to a wide array of media; and help clients protect their intellectual property rights.

Jay Ward Brown (LSKS)

LSKS has been at the vanguard in representing the media in many of its most significant and consequential First Amendment cases in recent years. Last month, the firm achieved dismissal in federal court of a defamation suit brought against The New York Times by former vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin. LSKS also helped the Associated Press obtain the release of sealed documents in the Bill Cosby sexual assault cases; successfully defended NBCUniversal in a defamation suit brought by George Zimmerman, the man acquitted in the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin; and succeeded in reversing a jury verdict against the estate of famed Navy SEAL Chris Kyle in a case brought by Jesse Ventura following the publication of Kyle’s best-selling book American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History.

“We are more committed than ever to providing our clients with the strongest, most comprehensive representation possible,” said LSKS Managing Partner Jay Ward Brown. “We saw that same commitment in Ballard Spahr, and we knew that Ballard—with its practice depth and national platform —would support and strengthen our work. We share many of the same clients, and those clients have the highest regard for Ballard Spahr. Together, this team is second to none.”

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 As with Levine Sullivan Koch & Schulz, Ballard Spahr will continue to host and support The First Amendment Salon.

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Ballard Spahr welcomes the following attorneys from LSKS:

  • Lee Levine
  • Michael D. Sullivan
  • Elizabeth C. Koch
  • David A. Schulz
  • Thomas B. Kelley
  • Celeste Phillips
  • Robert Penchina
  • Seth D. Berlin
  • Jay Ward Brown
  • Steven D. Zansberg
  • Michael Berry
  • Chad R. Bowman
  • Cameron Stracher
  • Ashley I. Kissinger
  • Alia L. Smith
  • Paul J. Safier
  • Elizabeth Seidlin Bernstein
  • Mara J. Gassmann
  • Dana R. Green
  • Matthew E. Kelley
  • Jeremy A. Kutner
  • Max Mishkin
  • Thomas B. Sullivan
  • Al-Amyn Sumar
  • Alexander I. Ziccardi

The LSKS merger is the second to be announced by Ballard Spahr. Last week, Ballard Spahr announced that it will join with Lindquist & Vennum—a Minneapolis-based law firm known as a leader in middle-market M&A and private equity dealmaking—effective January 1, 2018. The combination will extend Ballard Spahr’s national footprint into the Midwest, giving the firm offices in Minneapolis and Sioux Falls, SD, and an expanded presence in Denver. When the mergers are completed, Ballard Spahr will have more than 675 lawyers in 15 offices across the country.

About Ballard SpahrBallard Spahr LLP, an Am Law 100 law firm with more than 500 lawyers in 13 offices in the United States, provides a range of services in litigation, business and finance, real estate, intellectual property, and public finance. Our clients include Fortune 500 companies, financial institutions, life sciences and technology companies, health systems, investors and developers, government agencies, media companies, educational institutions, and nonprofit organizations. The firm combines a national scope of practice with strong regional market knowledge. For more information, please visit www.ballardspahr.com.

About LSKSLevine Sullivan Koch & Schulz is a national law firm dedicated to serving the legal needs of creators and providers of virtually every type of content in virtually every kind of media, both traditional and new. Its practice focuses exclusively on the field of media law, specializing in First Amendment, entertainment, and intellectual property law. With offices in Washington, D.C., New York, Philadelphia, and Denver, the firm provides counsel nationwide on defamation and privacy, access and freedom of information, content regulation, subpoena matters, and intellectual property rights.


 

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Evolving Towards the Law Classroom of Tomorrow

Are the law schools of today preparing new attorneys for the legal profession of tomorrow? The Carnegie Foundation’s Educating Lawyers: Preparation for the Profession of Law provided a strong critique of legal academia, and contended that new attorneys are not taught the practical, real-world skills, that attorneys need. As the report noted, to the extent that professors can “bridge the gap between the analytical and practical knowledge,” new attorneys would be better situated to compete in the marketplace and obtain the ever-so-important first job. A 2010 study by NALP similarly found that “experiential learning opportunities,” “hands-on” or “simulated learning opportunities,” are “instrumental in preparing new associates for the demands of the practice of law.”

Putting aside any disagreements over these studies, most in the academy and in practice would probably agree that there is a gap–of some size–between what is taught in law schools today, and what students today need to work as lawyers.

What about the skills that lawyers will need in the near-future? That, is a tougher question. The legal profession has remained largely the same for some time. Attorneys, as a bunch, are generally resistant to change. Sure, new areas of law come into vogue (e.g., international law), and new tools are introduced to make research easier (e.g., WestLaw Next), but for the most part, the legal profession consists of a lawyer, or group of lawyers, providing a one-off, customized service–such as a brief, memo, will, contract, trust, etc.–to a single client. Law schools aim to prepare students for this manner of work.

The future of the legal profession may look different. Richard Susskind in The End of Lawyers? Rethinking the Nature of Legal Services, augurs an evolution–enabled by advanced technologies, outsourced labor, and weak demand for expensive associates–from a time-consuming, customized labor-intensive legal market to an on-demand, commoditized information-based legal service. Professor Larry Ribstein, co-author of Law’s Information Revolution, similarly writes “that much of law’s future isn’t in how to price one-to-one customized legal services, but in the development of legal information products.” Many legal services that are created today through individualized, customized efforts by toiling associates, will be replaced by information products that can be downloaded on demand, like a commodity. Think of a hybrid of LegalZoom.com, Google,and Facebook: instantly obtain legal services customized to your personal situation with the click of a mouse. To preempt many objections, don’t be so certain your practice of law will be excluded from this automation. This transform no doubt would dramatically change the skills attorneys of the not-so-distant future will need.

To repeat the question I opened with, are the law schools of today preparing new attorneys for the legal profession of tomorrow? In many respects, the law student depicted in Norman Rockwell’s 1927 classic portrait (pictured above, I call him Abe) is not too different from the law student of today. Students are taught (hopefully) basic legal research skills, how to write, how to make oral arguments, how to read cases, and how to “think like a lawyer” (whatever that means). If Susskind, Ribstein, and others are right about the progression of how law is practiced, I ponder whether law students–as well as the Professoriate–will be prepared for the future legal profession. Will the gap between academia and practice grow even further?

So how do we prepare law students for the legal profession of tomorrow? The answer is well beyond the scope of this post, which I provide as food for thought. Though, for starters, banning laptops in the classroom is probably not going in the right direction. I hope to blog about this topic more in the coming month, but for now check out my liveblogged Google Doc article work-in-progress, as well as here, here, here, and generally here.

Crossposted at JoshBlackman.com.