Category: Roundups

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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 04.01.14

Welcome to the first Law and Humanities ROUNDUP post. Here are some items I hope you will find of interest.

LSA

The Law and Society Association (LSA) Meeting, one of the most important conferences in the area of Law and Humanities, takes place May 29-June 1 in friendly Minneapolis, Minnesota. This year’s theme centers on the role of law and legal institutions in sustaining, creating, interrogating, and ameliorating inequalities. The 2014 Program invites participants to explore and consider three questions:

  • How can Law and Society scholarship contribute to unearthing and understanding inequalities?
  • How can Law and Society scholarship contribute to the critical interrogation of discourses of equality and inequality and help to reveal what is at stake in these concepts?
  • What impact can we expect these scholarly contributions to have on the persistence of these inequalities and on public discourse about them?

You can check out the preliminary program, register, and find hotel information here. Early registration ends April 15 (with 50 percent refunds available through that date. You cannot obtain any refunds after April 15).

If  you have always thought about writing legal fiction, check out this announcement from Alafair Burke at Hofstra Law.  Professor Burke, who writes the Ellie Hatcher novels, along with two other best-selling lawyer authors, Lee Child (who writes the Jack Reacher thrillers) and Marcia Clark (author of the Rachel Knight series) will be judges of a crime fiction competition being offered by Hofstra Law and Mulholland Books. The rules are simple, and include this one: Your story must feature a lawyer as a main character. Read the rest of the rules here. Deadline for entries is May 1, 2014.

UCLA English professor Eric Jager has published another interesting title: Blood Royal: A True Tale of Crime and Detection in Medieval Paris (Little, Brown), available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats.  Here’s the description of the book from the publisher’s website.

A riveting true story of murder and detection in 15th-century Paris, by one of the most brilliant medievalists of his generation. On a chilly November night in 1407, Louis of Orleans was murdered by a band of masked men. The crime stunned and paralyzed France since Louis had often ruled in place of his brother King Charles, who had gone mad. As panic seized Paris, an investigation began. In charge was the Provost of Paris, Guillaume de Tignonville, the city’s chief law enforcement officer–and one of history’s first detectives. As de Tignonville began to investigate, he realized that his hunt for the truth was much more dangerous than he ever could have imagined. A rich portrait of a distant world, BLOOD ROYAL is a gripping story of conspiracy, crime and an increasingly desperate hunt for the truth. And in Guillaume de Tignonville, we have an unforgettable detective for the ages, a classic gumshoe for a cobblestoned era.

Dr. Jager’s previous book, The Last Duel, about trial by combat in medieval France, (in this case, over whether a noblewoman’s claim that she had been raped was true), was nominated for the Crime Writers’ Association Gold Dagger Award and adapted for a BBC documentary in 2008.

 

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Introducing Christine Corcos

Corcos 01I’m very pleased to announce that Professor Christine Corcos will be keeping us updated regularly about Law & Humanities as well as Media Law.

Christine is the Richard C. Cadwallader Associate Professor of Law at the Louisiana State University Law Center and a member of the Women’s and Gender Studies Faculty at Louisiana State University A&M. She is the co-author of La Politique du Logement aux Etats-Unis (1999), the author of An International Guide to Law and Literature Studies (Hein, 2000) and editor of Law and Magic: A Collection of Essays (Carolina Academic Press 2010). She has written numerous law review articles and essays including George Carlin, Constitutional Law Scholar, and Visits to a Small Planet: Rights Talk in Some Science Fiction Film and Television Series From the 1950s to the 1990s, for the Stetson Law Review, Some Thoughts on Chuck Lorre, “Bad Words,” and the “Raging Paranoia of Our Network Censors,” in the Regent Law Review, From Agnatic Succession to Absolute Primogeniture: The Shift to Equal Rights of Succession to Thrones and Titles in the Modern European Constitutional Monarchy, for the Michigan State Law Review, an essay on the tv show Damages for the collection Lawyers in Your Living Room (ABA, 2009), Prosecutors and Psychics on the Air: Does a “Psychic Detective Effect” Exist for the collection Law and Justice on the Small Screen (Hart Publishing, 2012), and Magical Images in Law for the collection Explorations in Courtroom Discourse (Ashgate, 2011). She is currently doing some writing in the area of law and religion, particularly on the First Amendment, Spiritualism, and “crafty sciences.”

She is a co-author of several casebooks, including Theater Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2004), Law and Popular Culture (2d ed., LEXIS Publishing, 2012), and Law of the European Union: A New Constitutional Order (2d ed., Carolina Academic Press, 2013). She is Secretary/Treasurer of the Law and Humanities Institute and a member of the Board of Editors of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law. She also blogs at Media Law Prof Blog, the Law and Magic Blog, the Law and Humanities Blog (for the Law and Humanities Institute) and Feminist Law Professors.

She speaks frequently to the media on media law and law and popular culture.

Areas of interest: First Amendment, Freedom of Expression, Law and Religion, Legal History (including Women’s Legal History), Law and Popular Culture

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Introducing the Legal Roundup Project

I’m pleased to announce the launch of our Legal Roundup Project.  The goal of the Legal Roundup Project is for Concurring Opinions to become a central hub where people can learn about the highlights of different fields.

We have invited academics in a variety of fields to post roundups of key scholarship, cases, events, news, and developments in their fields.  Far too often, we can get so immersed in our own fields that we might miss out on useful ideas, debates, developments, cases, and scholarship in other fields.

We have asked participating scholars to focus on the developments and scholarship in their field that would be most relevant and interesting for everyone, not just to write primarily for others in their field.

Over the next few months, we plan to expand the project to cover more fields.  We hope that you will find the Legal Roundup Project to be useful and interesting.