Category: Constitutional Law

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FAN 166 (First Amendment News) Deleted Passages: VA ACLU abandons key portions of its original statement regarding William & Mary controversy

[Earlier this month]  a representative from the American Civil Liberties Union saw her chance to speak about the First Amendment squashed by students chagrined by the actions of her employer.Virginia Gazette, Oct. 6, 2017 The website of the ACLU of Virginia contains a statement by Claire Guthrie Gastañaga, its Executive Director. That statement pertains to the recent controversy at William and Mary. Below are portions of that statement, including passages in red that were apparently contained in the original version but no longer exist in the current one.

Claire Guthrie Gastañaga

“The ACLU of Virginia was invited by the College of William & Mary Alma Mater Productions to speak to students on Sept. 27 about their First Amendment rights, and, particularly, their rights at protests and demonstrations. We were pleased to accept the invitation and looked forward to making the presentation and answering questions on a wide range of topics. We were disappointed that we didn’t get the chance to provide the information that the students asked us to present nor to answer the tough questions we expected the student organizers and audience members to ask. . . .”

“The ACLU of Virginia supports unequivocally the freedom of professors, students and administrators to teach, learn, discuss and debate or to express ideas, opinions or feelings in classroom, public or private discourse.”

“We also support the goals espoused by the demonstrators (ending white supremacy, achieving racial justice, elevating those who have been oppressed). It is more than disappointing, however, when the robust debate that should be the hallmark of the culture of inquiry on a college campus is disrupted by those who seek with their own voices or actions simply to silence others who took actions or hold views based on principles with which they disagree.”

 “Disruption that prevents a speaker from speaking, and audience members from hearing the speaker, is not constitutionally protected speech even on a public college campus subject to the First Amendment; it is a classic example of a heckler’s veto, and, appropriately, can be prohibited by a college student code of conduct as it is at William and Mary. As a government entity, a public college like William and Mary has an obligation to protect the freedom of the speaker to speak and not to allow one group of people to shout down or seek to intimidate other speakers or members of the audience who wish to hear the speaker from exercising their own free speech rights. This is true regardless of what individuals or groups are speaking, protesting or counter-protesting.” [This passage survives in a blog post by Sam Harris.] “The ACLU of Virginia has been and will continue to be unwavering in its commitment to campus free speech. We are equally committed to ensuring that all universities take appropriate steps to ensure that the environment on their campuses fosters tolerance and mutual respect among members of the campus community, and an environment in which all students can exercise their right to participate meaningfully in campus life without being subject to discrimination. . . . ” “What happened at William and Mary on Sept. 27 is a part of a larger national trend that is challenging campus leaders across the country to find the right formula for assuring that critical community conversations can take place in a culture of inquiry consistent with a true learning environment. Actions that bully, intimidate or disrupt must not be without consequences in any such formula.” [This passage survives in an Inside Higher Ed story by Jeremy Bauer-Wolf. Though that story contained a link to the passage in red quoted above, the contents of that link have apparently been changed since it no longer contains the lines quoted above.]

Bill Farrar of the VA ACLU

Deleted passages: By all accounts, the passages in red were contained in an earlier version of the ACLU’s statement but do not appear in the current version.

VA ACLU Responds: When asked about the above, Bill Farrar, Director of Strategic Communications, responded: “We revised our statement based on internal feeedback from our colleagues.” He agreed that the deleted passages no longer reflect the Virginia ACLU’s current position. When asked if the National ACLU was consulted, Mr. Farrar said it was not.

Hecklers shout down California attorney general 

This from Adam Steinbaugh over at FIRE: “Last week, Whittier College — my alma mater — hosted California’s Attorney General, Xavier Becerra, in a question-and-answer session organized by Ian Calderon, the Majority Leader of the California State Assembly.”

“They tried to, anyway. The event ended early after pro-Trump hecklers, upset about Becerra’s lawsuit against the Trump administration over DACA, continuously shouted slogans and insults at Becerra and Calderon. A group affiliated with the hecklers later boasted that the speakers were ‘SHOUTED DOWN BY FED-UP CALIFORNIANS” and that the “meeting became so raucous that it ended about a half hour early.'”

“The event, held in Whittier College’s Shannon Center theater, was free and open to members of the community, and featured introductions from both Whittier’s president and student body president. Becerra and Calderon were to have an hour-long question-and-answer session using audience questions randomly selected from a basket. As soon as they began the discussion, however, hecklers decked in ‘Make America Great Again’ hats began a continuous and persistent chorus of boos, slogans, and insults.”

“Video captured by an alumnus captures the difficulty of hearing the discussion”:

“Video uploaded by two of the hecklers, Arthur C. Schaper and Harim Uzziel, captures the entirety of the affair, complete with chanted slogans and insults, such as ‘lock him up,’ ‘build that wall,’ ‘obey the law,’ ‘respect our president,’ ‘Americans first,’ and ‘You must respect our president!’ It also captures audience members repeatedly asking the hecklers to stop, and campus security officials approaching the group. Another video posted by “We the People Rising” also captured much of the disruption”:

“Calderon asked the audience to hold applause or booing, remarking: ‘It’s important that we have a productive conversation here.’ Becerra said that he thought the First Amendment to be a “precious thing,” but said he doubted the audience could hear him speak. The event, scheduled for an hour, concluded after about 34 minutes.”

“Schaper, a conservative columnist, is known for leading disruptions targeting Democratic officials, and was recently charged with disrupting a public meeting. For example, he disrupted a congresswoman’s ‘Know Your Rights’ forum, intended to give information to undocumented immigrants. ‘It was offensive,’ Schaper told the San Gabriel Valley Tribune. ‘[The congresswoman] took an oath to uphold [the] Constitution, and now she’s sponsoring a town hall that teaches illegal aliens about rights they don’t have.’ . . . “

Coming Soon: The First Amendment in the Regulatory State — Research Roundtable Read More

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FAN 165.2 (First Amendment News) Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten court documents now posted on First Amendment Library

Judge Learned Hand’s order granting the temporary injunction against the postmaster and ordering the magazine transmitted through the mails “without delay” was dated July 26, two days after the decision became known. During that brief period, the company pulled back the copies sent to the Post Office so the edition could be delivered by alternate means. On the same day the order was issued, U.S. Attorney Francis G. Caffey filed an Assignment of Error listing grounds on which he would rely in his appeal from Hand’s decree. In all, there were seven alleged errors, although essentially all of them went directly to the bottom line: Hand was wrong in finding for the magazine under every provision of the Espionage Act raised by government and wrong in granting the injunction.   — Eric Easton, Defending the Masses (Jan. 2018) 

* * * *

‘Tis the year of The Masses. This year marks the 100th anniversary of Judge Learned Hand’s seminal free-speech opinion in Masses Publishing Co. v. PattenAs previously reported here, two major events have been organized to celebrate the occasion.

New York Univeristy School of Law and the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University are hosting an all-day conference in New York on October 20th.

Gilbert E. Roe (lawyer for The Masses)

 Not long thereafter, on November 6th, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, in association with The First Amendment Salons, the Floyd Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression at Yale Law School, and the Media Law Committee of the New York State Bar Association, will host a “reargument” of the appeal in Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten. Floyd Abrams will appear on behalf of Postmaster Patten and Kathleen M. Sullivan will appear on behalf of Masses Publishing Co. The case will be argued before a panel of three judges:

  • Circuit Judge Reena Raggi,
  • Circuit Judge Pierre N. Leval, and
  • Circuit Judge Robert D. Sack

Original court documents posted for first time

In light of all of the above, the folks over at the First Amendment Library (led by Jackie Farmer) have uploaded 18 never before posted documents relating to the appeal in The Masses case. Among other things, this compilation includes the complaint, various affidavits filed in the case, transcript of the record, the order staying Judge Hand’s injunction, and much more.

Adriana Mark, head of research and education for the Second Circuit Library, unearthed these documents for the First Amendment Library. The librarians at the Gallagher Library of the University of Washington School of Law also provided additional research.

As the editor of the Library, I wrote the Introduction to the collection of The Masses documents.

Professor Eric Easton, author of Defending the Masses: A Progressive Lawyer’s Battles for Free Speech University of Wisconsin Press (Jan. 2018), kindly agreed to allow us to post a chapter from his forthcoming book, this to provide additional context for the documents posted.

            Judge Hand’s signature in Masses case

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FAN 165.1 (First Amendment News) New FIRE Report — Majority of college students self-censor & support disinvitations

This from a just-released report from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE):

PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 11, 2017 — A new report from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education finds a majority of students on college campuses self-censor in class, support disinviting some guest speakers with whom they disagree, and don’t know that hate speech is protected by the First Amendment. The study also finds that Republican and Democratic students have different opinions on campus protests, disinvitations, and hate speech protections.
In the most comprehensive survey on students’ attitudes about free speech to date, FIRE measured student responses to questions about self expression, reactions to expression of other students, guest speakers, and hate speech. Some key findings include:
  • 46 percent of students recognize that hate speech is protected by the First Amendment, and 48 percent of students think the First Amendment should not protect hate speech.
  • Most students (56 percent) support disinviting some guest speakers. Democratic students are 19 percentage points more likely than their Republican peers to agree that there are times a speaker should be disinvited.
  • 58 percent of college students think it’s important to be part of a campus community where they are not exposed to intolerant or offensive ideas.
  • Very few students report that they would participate in actions that would prevent a guest speaker event from taking place (2 percent). Even fewer said they would use violence to disrupt an event (1 percent).
  • In open-ended questions, almost half of students (45 percent) identify speech with a racist component as hate speech, and 13 percent of students associate hate speech with violence.
  • In class, 30 percent of students have self-censored because they thought their words would be offensive to others. A majority of students (54 percent) report self-censoring in the classroom at some point since the beginning of college.

FIRE’s survey also found ideological differences in how students feel about free expression, both inside and outside the classroom. Very liberal students are 14 percentage points more likely than their very conservative peers to feel comfortable expressing their opinions in the classroom. Additionally, 60 percent of Republican students think they should not have to walk past a protest on campus, while only 28 percent of Democratic students think the same.

Robert Shibley

“There is clearly a partisan divide in how students perceive free speech on college campuses,” said FIRE Executive Director Robert Shibley. “This further solidifies the importance of FIRE’s mission. Free expression is too important to become a partisan issue in higher education.”

Additionally, FIRE’s survey found that a majority of students want their schools to invite a variety of guest speakers to campus (93 percent), and 64 percent report changing an attitude or opinion after listening to a guest speaker.

FIRE contracted with YouGov (California), a nonpartisan polling and research firm, to survey 1,250 American undergraduate students between May 25 and June 8. YouGov calculated weights for each response based on the respondent’s gender, race, and age. A copy of the full report, an FAQ, and the toplines and tabulations from YouGov can be accessed here.

The survey project was made possible by a grant from the John Templeton Foundation to conduct polling on campus attitudes, engage in legal and social science research, and mobilize a wider audience on and off campus in the fight for student and faculty rights.

ContactWilliam Rickards, Communications Coordinator, FIRE
215-717-3473; media@thefire.org
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Annotating Section Two of the Fourteenth Amendment

Last week I participated in a workshop organized by the ABA to assist civics teachers who want to teach their students about the Fourteenth Amendment. As part of that program, the ABA gave each of us a pocket constitution.  You are all familiar with these. But the ABA version is annotated to some extent. At the end of Section Two of the Fourteenth Amendment, a note says “Section Two age requirements superseded by the 26th Amendment and ‘male’ restrictions superseded by the 19th Amendment.”

Now I think this is the correct reading, as I explain in my forthcoming paper about Section 2 and the reapportionment process. On the other hand, no case says this, which raises the question of why the annotators think that this is true and are telling people it is true. (This is the only annotation for the amendments in the ABA pocket constitution.)

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FAN 165 (First Amendment News) Major New First Amendment News, Analysis & History Website Launched

Prof. Stephen Solomon (credit: Sarah Solomon)

If you are interested in the First Amendment, be prepared to bookmark an invaluable new site: First Amendment Watch. This news, anlysis and history website is the brainchild of Stephen D. Solomon, New York University’s Marjorie Deane Professor at NYU’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute, where he teaches First Amendment law.

Recall: Professor Solomon is the author of, among other works, Revolutionary Dissent: How the Founding Generation Created the Freedom of Speech (2016) (First Amendment Salon video here and news story re his speech at History Book Festival event here.)

Managing Editor: Tatiana Serafin has covered issues of press freedom for various publications, including her latest “I, Journalist” for The Seventh Wave. She was a staff writer at Forbes and then co-editor of the magazine’s billionaire’s list, initiating coverage of billionaires in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. She continues as a Forbes Contributor and is an Adjunct Professor at Marymount Manhattan College.

The mission of the site is to document threats to the First Amendment’s freedoms of speech, press, assembly, and petition. First Amendment Watch will highlight threats to the freedom of expression as they arise and provide continuing updates as news develops. The most important element is the deep dives into legal and historical background that provides the perspective that helps readers gain a full understanding of today’s First Amendment conflicts.

Social media also play an important role in getting news message out to the public. (See FAW’s Facebook and Twitter links.) “We hope to have a strong social media presence,” said Solomon. “We want to be engaged with the community and create a site for people to visit and learn about important First Amendment news issues.”

→ The startup phase of First Amendment Watch is entirely funded by New York University as a nonpartisan project in the public interest.

Easy to Navigate Topical Tabs 

The site has seven tabs on its information bar:

  1. News Gathering
  2. Speech
  3. Libel
  4. Threats
  5. Censorship
  6. Assembly
  7. Privacy

Managing editor Tatiana Serafin

Each tab contains numerous links to relevant news, updates, analysis, opinion and historical materials. See, for example:

Profiles — news, analysis & historical backdrop — of Contemporary Controversies 

→ Considerable attention is given to some of the most pressing free speech issues of the day, as in the case of Masterpiece Cakeshop, Ltd. v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. The entry for that case is titled  Discrimination or Free Speech? What’s At Stake in the Wedding Cake Conflict.

→ Another such entry is The Supreme Court Considers First Amendment Arguments in Gerrymandering Case, the reference being to the oral arguments in Gill v. Whitford. These entries contain links to: audio and video clips, news stories and opinion posts,  and lower court opinions and appellate briefs, among other things.

Make the Connection: Linking Today’s Controversies to Those of the Past

Symbolic Speech in Early America: Liberty Tree in colonial Boston

From Liberty Tree to Taking a Knee: America’s Founding Era Sheds Light on the NFL Controversy

“Symbolic speech as a form of protest, like taking a knee at a football game while others stand for the National Anthem, enjoys a long history in America. It’s been a powerful form of political expression going back to the protests in the colonies in the 1760s against British oppression. Various forms of symbolic expression—liberty trees, liberty poles, effigies of hated politicians, even the use of the number 45—brought multitudes into the political sphere and was critical in building opposition to British rule. Much of this symbolic expression was controversial and even offensive but a powerful form of protest then and now.” – By Stephen Solomon

Mapping Free Speech Controversies

There is also a Mapping First Amendment Conflicts link that pinpoints timely free speech controversies accordingly to geographical areas.  From small to big cities, from social media to the White House, First Amendment conflicts arise nearly every day. They can involve libel suits against a big media organization, an attempt by state legislators to restrict demonstrations, public officials blocking Twitter followers they don’t like, and much more. The endless challenges to freedom of expression raise vital questions of constitutional law and the place of free speech in a democratic society. All one has to do is click on the map icons to get brief descriptions of controversies large and small as well as links to more information.

Thus, if you click on the Washington State pointer, this pops up:

Assembly – Olympia, WA – 10/11/16 — description

A Republican State Senator introduced a measure aimed at criminalizing what he calls “economic terrorism.” It “would make protesting a class C felony should it cause any sort of “economic disruption” or “jeopardize human life and property.””  http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/306580-washington- 

Video Links 

There are some interesting video links on the site as well.  For example:

Future Plans 

Plans for the future involve invited comment from experts as well as original videos and podcasts.

And yes, for those of you who wish to support this website, there is a tab you can click on to donate to it. Though NYU provided startup funding,  the site can continue only with outside funding.

*  * * Other First Amendment Websites * * * 

History of Film Censorship Timeline

Prof. Laura Wittern-Keller

 

Over at FIRE’s First Amendment Library, they have just posted an impressive History of Film Censorship Timeline.

The timeline was created by Professor Laura Wittern-Keller, author of Freedom of the Screen: Legal Challenges to State Film Censorship, 1915-1981 (2008) and The Miracle Case: Film Censorship and the Supreme Court (2008).

 

 

Scholarly Articles: One New, One Forthcoming  Read More

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FAN 164 (First Amendment News) 1917 Masses Case to be Reargued in Second Circuit — Floyd Abrams & Kathleen Sullivan to Argue Case

On November 6th the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, in association with The First Amendment Salons, the Floyd Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression at Yale Law School, and the Media Law Committee of the New York State Bar Association, will host a “reargument” of the appeal in Masses Publishing Co. v. Pattenthis on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the case. The case will be argued before a panel of three judges:

  • Circuit Judge Reena Raggi,
  • Circuit Judge Pierre N. Leval, and
  • Circuit Judge Robert D. Sack

Second Circuit Chief Judge Robert Katzmann will introduce the event. Noted First Amendment lawyer Floyd Abrams will appear on behalf of Postmaster Patten (yes, he will represent the government) and Kathleen M. Sullivan (former Stanford Law dean and seasoned appellate litigator) will appear on behalf of Masses Publishing Co.

* * * *

→ Related Event: A Decision for the Ages: A Symposium Marking the Centenary of Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten

Date & Locale: Friday, October 20, 2017 – New York University School of Law

Historical and Cultural Background – 9:00-10:30

  1. The Artistic and Cultural Scene in 1917 as reflected in The Masses magazine: Amy Adler (NYU)
  2. The Political Situation and The Espionage Act of 1917: Geoffrey Stone (Chicago)
  3. The State of Free Speech Doctrine in 1917: David Rabban (Texas)

Moderator: Michael McConnell (Stanford)

The Masses case: Dramatis Personae and Decision – 10:45-12:15

  1. Learned Hand’s Jurisprudence: Ed Purcell (New York Law School)
  2. The Role of Gilbert Roe, the Masses attorney: Eric Easton (Baltimore)
  3. The Decision: Vincent Blasi (Columbia)

Moderator: Judge Robert Sack (Second Circuit)

Lunch Break – 12:30-1:30

Aftermath of the Masses decision1:45-3:15

  1. Hand’s influence on Holmes and the Abrams dissent: Thomas Healy (Seton Hall)
  2. Hand’s influence on free speech theory and justifications: Mark Graber (Maryland)
  3. Hand’s subsequent free speech decisions: Paul Bender (ASU) (via videoconference)

Moderator: Jeremy Kessler (Columbia)

The Influence of Masses on Modern First Amendment Doctrine — 3:30-5:00

A discussion about the extent to which the Masses test has been incorporated into Brandenburg and other modern cases: Burt Neuborne (NYU); James Weinstein (ASU); Martha Field (Harvard)

Moderator: Robert LoBue (Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler)

Reception – 5:15-6:15 p.m.

More Controversy: The ACLU’s Defense of Free Speech  Read More

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FAN 163 (First Amendment News) Sanford Ungar Heads New Free Speech Project at Georgetown University

At the heart of this project is how universities and American society at large can uphold the First Amendment while also protecting people from harassment and threats of violence. We will study the condition of free speech in America today, both in higher education and in civil society, in an attempt to create frameworks that promote public discussion about divisive issues in a civil manner. — Sanford J. Ungar

Some know him as the president emeritus of Goucher College. Others know him as a vetran journalist with UPI, or as a former Washington editor of The Atlantic, or as a past director of the Voice of America.  Still others know him as the former dean of the School of Communication at American University. And yet others know him as the author of The Papers & The Papers: An Account of the Legal and Political Battle over the Pentagon Papers (1973). Now Sandy Ungar has a new job title: director of The Free Speech Project (Georgetown University), with funding from the Knight Foundation.

Sanford Ungar (credit: Lumina Foundation)

Here is the focus of The Project: “Pitched battles in the streets of Berkeley, California, as rival factions fight over who should be allowed to speak at one of America’s great public universities.  A faculty member seriously injured on the idyllic campus of Middlebury College in Vermont as violence erupts at a talk by a controversial visitor that she attempted to moderate.  Bedlam on the floor of the Texas House of Representatives with pistol-packing legislators threatening to kill each other.  A Princeton professor receives death threats and goes into hiding after cellphone videos of a commencement speech she gave in New England, in which she criticized President Trump, go viral. A massive replica of the Ten Commandments erected near the Arkansas State Capitol, but bulldozed into smithereens hours later by an angry citizen. A neighborhood pizza parlor in the nation’s capital hurled into the spotlight after a “fake news” conspiracy report inspires a North Carolina man to open fire in the restaurant. One of America’s great newspapers, the Los Angeles Times, reduced to recruiting subscribers by promising ‘We publish what’s REAL.'”

“What is happening to Free Speech in America?  The Free Speech Project at Georgetown University, launched with the support of the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, aspires to find out and to analyze the condition of First Amendment values.”

Here is how The Project is described: “The project’s Free Speech Tracker, perhaps the first of its kind, documents incidents across the country over the past two years and going forward, as well as monitoring activity in state legislatures seeking to curb or calm public protest.”

“‘Our theory,’ says Ungar, a distinguished scholar-in-residence at Georgetown since 2014, ‘is that these incidents and various legislative initiatives are all related.'”

“‘When you have stark and deadly confrontations in Charlottesville and brawls and death threats on the floor of the Texas legislature, you cannot expect college and university campuses to be islands of civility and peaceful debate,’ he adds. ‘We have to understand and deal with the fact that some young people may try to shut down speech they find offensive because they are worried that they won’t have their own opportunity to speak up and be heard.'”

“‘Our nation was founded on the principles of free debate and dissent as enshrined in the First Amendment,’ said Jennifer Preston, Knight Foundation vice president for journalism. ‘At various times in history these rights have been challenged and are now being tested in an America where trust in institutions, in news and in each other grows more tenuous. To preserve the First Amendment, we must examine and better understand the forces that might jeopardize its future.’

“Ungar says the independent and nonpartisan Free Speech Project will address such concerns by looking more deeply into volatile incidents and emerging legislation around the country.”

Website, video & archives 

“The website eventually will include videos of one-on-one interviews by Ungar with key thinkers in the free speech debate, and currently contains an archive of commentary and analysis from newspapers and other sources concerning freedom of speech and other First Amendment rights.”

“The archive covers five areas – legal jurisprudence, campus incidents, legislative developments, freedom of the press and government secrecy, and civil society.”

“‘Free Speech is debated and analyzed at a dizzying pace by leading thinkers and journalists around the country and throughout the world,’ Ungar says. ‘We can’t compile every article related to free speech, but we do hope to offer commentary across the political spectrum to show the wide-ranging perspectives and viewpoints on this issue.'”

Project to host programs

“Operating out of Georgetown but independent of the university, the project will also sponsor public programs – on campus in its first year and later in other venues – where various constituencies can contribute ideas about how to reestablish national respect for fundamental First Amendment values while also promoting civility and inclusiveness.”

“‘We need to focus on how better to preserve and protect free speech, but also get buy-in from all the people and groups that believe in free expression and are in a position to promote it,’ Ungar explains. ‘This is fundamental to the survival of American democracy, especially in these turbulent times.'”

Sanford J. Ungar, Bannon called the media the ‘opposition.’ He’s right, and it’s a good thing, Washington Post, Feb. 7, 2017

Just In: ** David Shortell, Sessions to wade into divisive campus free speech debate, CNN, Sept. 26, 2017 **

Coming: Major Conference on Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten

Title of Event: A Decision for the Ages: A Symposium Marking the Centenary of Masses Publishing Co. v. Patten

Co-hosted by:

  • New York University School of Law
  • Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University.

Date, Time & Location: The symposium will be held at New York University School of Law on Friday, October 20, from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in Greenberg Lounge.  A reception will follow.

Program:

Historical and Cultural Background

  • Amy Adler, Emily Kempin Professor of Law, New York University School of Law
  • Geoffrey Stone, Edward H. Levi Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School
  • David Rabban, Dahr Jamail, Randall Hage Jamail and Robert Lee Jamail Regents Chair and University Distinguished Teaching Professor, University of Texas School of Law

The Masses Case: Dramatis Personae and Decision

  • Edward A. Purcell, Jr., Joseph Solomon Distinguished Professor of Law, New York Law School
  • Eric Easton, Professor of Law, University of Baltimore School of Law
  • Vincent Blasi, Corliss Lamont Professor of Civil Liberties, Columbia Law School

 Aftermath of the Masses Decision

  • Thomas Healy, Professor of Law, Seton Hall Law School
  • Mark Graber, University System of Maryland Regents Professor, University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law
  • Paul Bender, Professor of Law, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University (via videoconference)

The Influence of Masses on Modern First Amendment Doctrine

  • Burt Neuborne, Norman Dorsen Professor of Civil Liberties, New York University School of Law
  • James Weinstein, Dan Cracchiolo Chair in Constitutional Law, Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State University
  • Martha Field, Langdell Professor of Law, Harvard Law School

Replay: Podcast — Judge Richard Posner on the First Amendment

  • On the retirment of Judge Richard Posner, Nico Perrino over at FIRE’s So to Speak replayed a First Amendment Salon interview Professor Geoffrey Stone did with Judge Posner back in May of 2016.

→ See also: Nico Perrino, The British free speech invasion, So to Speak, Sept. 21, 2017

Video: Cato Constitution Day Panel: “First Amendment Challenges” Read More

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FAN 162 (First Amendment News) Online First Amendment Encyclopedia Launched

Given our increasingly polarized society, it’s important to remember what should unite us: respect for freedom of speech, press, religion, and the right to assemble and petition. — Ken Paulson (Sept. 14, 2017)

Dean Ken Paulson (credit: Bruce Guthrie)

It’s online now: The First Amendment Encyclopedia. Among other things, it is a impressive collection of more than 1,500 articles on First Amendment topics, court cases, and history. The online encyclopedia was culled and updated from the two-volume Encyclopedia of The First Amendment edited by John R. Vile, David L. Hudson, Jr. & David Schultz.

Two of the three original editors of the volumes — John Vile and David Hudson — spent the past several months reviewing and updating entries and adding new ones.

This online treasure trove of information was originally published by Congressional Quarterly in 2009 and listed for $355.00. The online encyclopedia (now free of charge) comprehensively examines the political, historical, and cultural significance and development of freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press, the right to peaceably assemble, and the right to petition the government.

 The rights to the Encyclopedia were purchased by Dean Ken Paulson of Middle Tennessee State University.

John Seigenthaler (1927-2014)

“We’ve found the now out-of-print two-volume edition,” said Paulson, “to be an extraordinary resource, so we purchased it, digitized it and updated the content.  It’s a remarkable resource for those interested in First Amendment freedoms and it’s written in a style that makes it useful to both students and scholars.”

“The encyclopedia,” he added, “is part of an ongoing expansion of the Seigenthaler Chair of Excellence in First Amendment Studies at Middle Tennessee State Univeristy. The chair honors John Seigenthaler and his lifelong commitment to the First Amendment. Expanded programing and the revitalization of the website are among the steps we’re taking to address John’s lifelong goal of preserving and protecting the First Amendment through education and information.”

Deborah Fisher at press conference

“This is a living, breathing project that will continue to grow in a way that promotes awareness and understanding of the First Amendment and its role in American history,” said Deborah Fisher, director of the Seigenthaler Chair of Excellence.

 Video of press conference here

 Disclosure: Many years ago Ken Paulson hired me to work at the First Amendment Center.

→ Related Resource: FIRE’s First Amendment Online Library

On Compelled Artistic Expression: Judge Breyer circa 1988

Re: Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission

If you want to get a sense of First Amendment law and compelled artistic expression, a good case to consult is Redgrave v. Boston Symphony Orchestra, 855 F.2d 888 (1st Cir. en banc, 1988).

First Circuit Judge Stephen Breyer (C-SPAN)

The case involved actress Vanessa Redgrave who “brought suit against the Boston Symphony Orchestra (BSO) for cancelling a contract for Redgrave’s appearance as narrator in a performance of Stravinsky’s Oedipus Rex. The cancellation occurred in the wake of protests over Redgrave’s participation because of her support of the Palestine Liberation Organization. She sought recovery both for breach of contract and for violation of her civil rights under [a Massachusetts civil rights law.”

Writing for the Court sitting en banc Judge Frank Coffin declared:

  • “Protection for free expression in the arts should be particularly strong when asserted against a state effort to compel expression.”
  • Judge Coffin then added: “We see no reason why less protection should be provided where the artist refuses to perform; indeed, silence tradi- tionally has been more sacrosanct than affirmative expression.”
  • The court was “unable to find any case, involving the arts or otherwise, in which a state has been allowed to compel expression,” and observed that doing so would be “completely unprecedented.”
  • “All three groups indicated, in tones ranging from strong suggestion to outright certainty, a view that the BSO should not be held liable under the [state civil rights law] for exercising its free speech right not to perform.”

Judge Stephen Breyer was one of the judges who joined Judge Coffin’s opinion.

See Amicus brief of First Amendent Lawyers Association in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission

ACLU Brief in Masterpiece Cakeshop Case Rejects Free Speech Claim Read More

2

Corfield v. Coryell

No book about Bushrod Washington would be complete without a thorough discussion of his most famous opinion. In Corfield, the Justice offered up this dictum about the privileges and immunities of citizens under the Constitution.

The inquiry is, what are the privileges and immunities of citizens in the several states? We feel no hesitation in confining these expressions to those privileges and immunities which are, in their nature, fundamental; which belong, of right, to the citizens of all free governments; and which have, at all times, been enjoyed by the citizens of the several states which compose this Union, from the time of their becoming free, independent, and sovereign. What these fundamental principles are, it would perhaps be more tedious than difficult to enumerate. They may, however, be all comprehended under the following general heads: Protection by the government; the enjoyment of life and liberty, with the right to acquire and possess property of every kind, and to pursue and obtain happiness and safety; subject nevertheless to such restraints as the government may justly prescribe for the general good of the whole. The right of a citizen of one state to pass through, or to reside in any other state, for purposes of trade, agriculture, professional pursuits, or otherwise; to claim the benefit of the writ of habeas corpus; to institute and maintain actions of any kind in the courts of the state; to take, hold and dispose of property, either real or personal; and an exemption from higher taxes or impositions than are paid by the other citizens of the state; may be mentioned as some of the particular privileges and immunities of citizens, which are clearly embraced by the general description of privileges deemed to be fundamental: to which may be added, the elective franchise, as regulated and established by the laws or constitution of the state in which it is to be exercised. These, and many others which might be mentioned, are, strictly speaking, privileges and immunities, and the enjoyment of them by the citizens of each state, in every other state, was manifestly calculated (to use the expressions of the preamble of the corresponding provision in the old articles of confederation) “the better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different states of the Union.”

There is no shortage of literature on Corfield, so I’ll have to work though that in developing my own thoughts.  But here is a tentative observation that, I think, is original.

Corfield is that first significant legal authority to stress the importance of the right to vote. If you look at the Founding era, you would be hard-pressed to find anything that talked about that right for individuals.  The Framers certainly cared about popular sovereignty, but they said little about voting rights. The Constitution, of course, left the definition of voting rights to the states. Justice Washington was thus far ahead of his time.  Even Section One of the Fourteenth Amendment and the Civil Rights Act of 1866, which some members of Congress read against the backdrop of Corfield, refused to embrace the radical idea that voting was a right.

1

FAN 161 (First Amendment News) Nadine Strossen’s Next Book — “Hate: Why We Should Resist it With Free Speech, Not Censorship”

In a forthcoming book, New York Law School Professor Nadine Strossen returns to a topic she explored 27 years ago in an insightful Duke Law Journal article titled “Regulating Racist Speech on Campus: A Modest Proposal?” This spring, Oxford University Press will publish her latest book:  Hate: Why We Should Resist it With Free Speech, Not Censorship. (This book is part of the “Inalienable Rights” Series, of which University of Chicago Law Professor Geoffrey Stone is editor.)

Dedication: The book is dedicated to “Norman Dorsen and Aryeh Neier, key leaders of the ACLU during the Skokie controversy, inspiring human rights champions, and revered mentors.”

I read an advance version of the manuscript and will say this: Strossen has accomplished something remarkable in this slim book — she has ventured into a complex and heavily examined field and produced a book that is original, insightful, and clear-headed. My guess: this book will become the go-to work in the field.   

Prof. Nadine Strossen

Abstract: One of Donald Trump’s signal successes in the 2016 election campaign was his unrelenting attack on ‘political correctness.’ While the phenomenon of political correctness is certainly very polarizing, it is also a capacious and somewhat amorphous concept. At root, though, it centers on speech and expression-the idea that since certain words and arguments are hurtful to those less powerful, they should therefore be viewed with suspicion and even opprobrium.

As the eminent scholar and activist Nadine Strossen shows, this is not a new idea. Long before anyone had heard of political correctness, the term ‘hate speech’ was in broad circulation. Indeed many of the controversies swirling around alleged political correctness are really claims and counterclaims about hate speech. Some say that Black Lives Matter engages in hate speech against cops. Some say evangelicals engage in hate speech against the LGBT community. The list of aggrieved populations is long, which begs a question: when is speech truly ‘hate speech’ or, alternatively, simply a cherished right protected by the Constitution?

In this book Strossen dispels the many misunderstandings that have clouded the perpetual debates about this topic, including the equally erroneous assertions that it is either absolutely unprotected or absolutely protected. She explains the more nuanced approach that U.S. law actually embodies: allowing hateful or discriminatory speech to be outlawed in many situations, including when it directly causes specific imminent serious harm; but not empowering government to punish such speech solely because its message is disfavored, disturbing, or feared to possibly contribute to some harm.

Prof. Geoffery Stone (series editor)

Strossen shows that such principles have been especially important for sheltering dissenting views, minority speakers, and advocates of equal rights causes. Conversely, she shows that the “hate speech” laws in many other countries, including those comparable to the U.S., have punished and chilled vital speech about public issues, leading many human rights activists in those countries and in international agencies to criticize those laws and to advocate the U.S. approach: counterspeech and other non-censorial alternatives, including strong enforcement of anti-discrimination laws. Beyond the constitutional arguments, Strossen makes a compelling, evidence-rich case that the “more speech” approach is more effective than censorship in countering the harms that “hate speech” is feared to cause: discrimination, violence, and psychic injuries.

→  This from Professor Stone’s Introduction:In this work, Strossen stakes out a bold and important claim about how best to protect both equality and freedom. Anyone who wants to advocate for ‘hate speech’ laws and policies in the future now has the “Devil’s Advocate” right at hand. No one can address this issue in the foreseeable future without taking on this formidable and compelling analysis. It lays the foundation for all debates on this issue for years to come.”

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgements

Editor’s Note

Essential Concepts 

Introduction

Chapter 1: Overview

Chapter 2: “Hate Speech” Laws Violate Fundamental Free Speech and Equality Principles

Chapter 3: When “Hate Speech” is Protected and When it is Punishable

Chapter 4: Because of Their Intractable Vagueness and Overbreadth, “Hate Speech” Laws Undermine Free Speech and Equality

Chapter 5: Is it Possible to Draft a “Hate Speech” Law That is Not Unduly Vague or Overbroad?

Chapter 6: Does Constitutionally Protected “Hate Speech” Actually Cause the Feared Harms?

Chapter 7: “Hate Speech” Laws Are at Best Ineffective and at Worst Counterproductive

Chapter 8: Non-Censorial Methods Effectively Curb the Potential Harms of  Constitutionally Protected “Hate Speech”

Chapter 9: Conclusion: Looking Back – and Forward

Corn-Revere files Amicus Brief in Masterpiece Cakeshop Read More