Category: Conferences

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New Book: Jack Bogle Appreciates Warren Buffett’s Surprise Shout Out

From this morning’s Omaha World Herald.  Editor’s note: In a new book, “The Warren Buffett Shareholder,” Buffett-watchers Lawrence Cunningham and Stephanie Cuba have compiled essays by 43 people about Berkshire Hathaway’s shareholder meetings, which now draw more than 40,000 people to Omaha each year. We will excerpt some of those essays each Sunday in print before this year’s May 5 annual meeting. Today’s comes from Vanguard Group founder Jack Bogle.

Late in December 2016, I received a note from my good friend Steve Galbraith asking me to put a “save-the-date” marker on my calendar for the weekend of May 6, 2017. He and his wife, Lucy, had a plan, undisclosed, to celebrate my 88th birthday on May 8.

At a dinner in Omaha with Warren and his new team of money managers (as Steve later told me), he had mentioned our friendship. Steve offered to bring me to the upcoming annual meeting of Berkshire Hathaway shareholders. Warren thought that was a great idea, and so the plot was hatched.

Unbeknownst to me, Steve had checked with Emily Snyder, my assistant at Vanguard, and with my wife, Eve, and told them of his plan to fly me out to Omaha and attend the annual meeting, something I had never done before.

So when the morning of May 5, 2017, arrived, Eve and I, with daughter Barbara and son-in-law Scott Renninger in tow, drove to Atlantic Aviation, Philadelphia’s terminal for private planes.

No sooner had we arrived than a Citation jet with Steve and Lucy aboard swooped down and scooped up our quartet. We were on our way! (Son Andrew and his friend Kathryn would meet us in Omaha on Saturday morning.)

After a short hop (that jet is fast!), we landed in Omaha. As Vanguard’s founder, I’d attained a modest celebrity status in the world of investing, but that hardly prepared me for the reception I received when we entered the Omaha Hilton.

At least 10 guests, armed with camera-ready iPhones, immediately snapped away at the new arrival.

Later, when our sextet dined at the hotel, scores of celebrity hunters continued to take photos, asking politely and working smartly. (I quickly learned that saying “yes” was infinitely more efficient then saying “no” and then arguing about it.)

When I awakened on Saturday morning and looked out of my hotel room window, I could hardly believe what I saw. A line, maybe four people wide, stretched from the CenturyLink Center, site of the annual meeting, to as far as I could see.

All told, 40,000 people would attend the 2017 annual meeting, almost half of whom were in the arena, with the rest of the throng watching on video from a remote site. Our now octet was ushered to premier seating in the arena, right behind the space reserved for Berkshire Hathaway longtime shareholders, and next to the company’s directors.

Warren and Charlie Munger were seated on the stage immediately before us.

As Warren gave his opening remarks — a summary of Berkshire’s 2016 results — I couldn’t help wondering why Steve had brought us to Omaha. My question was soon answered, as these excerpts from the meeting transcript reflect:

Buffett:

“Jack Bogle has done probably more for the American investor than any man in the country. Jack, could you stand up? There he is.

“Jack Bogle many years ago, he wasn’t the only one talking about an index fund, but it wouldn’t have happened without him. …

“I estimate that Jack, at a minimum, has saved, left in the pockets of investors without hurting them overall in terms of performance, gross performance, he’s put tens, and tens, and tens, of billions into their pockets.

“And those numbers are going to be hundreds and hundreds of billions over time. It’s Jack’s 88th birthday on Monday. So I just say, Happy Birthday, Jack. And thank you on behalf of American investors.”

Despite my surprise and delight, I was able to stand up and wave to Warren, Charlie and the cheering crowd. I confess to being deeply and emotionally touched by Warren Buffett’s generous words — a “red-letter” day in my now 67-year career.

After Warren’s shoutout, the number of photo seekers soared, to the point where I found it useful to leave each session 5 or 10 minutes before the intermission.

Even then, I began to understand why rock stars among our entertainers are so eager to avoid the paparazzi who follow their every move.

But I confess that, on this one grand occasion, I found huge satisfaction in being recognized for my contribution to the world of investing, and to the wealth of the human beings who have entrusted their assets to Vanguard’s index funds. (I’m only human!) …

This was hardly the first indication that Warren and I operated on investment principles that, while a long way from identical, have a certain commonality. …

Accolades are nice, and endorsements are, too, but human connections are what life is largely about. I celebrate the friendship and mutual admiration that I’ve shared with Warren Buffett and Steve Galbraith, men of integrity, wisdom and class.

Excerpted exclusively for The World-Herald from “The Warren Buffett Shareholder: Stories From Inside the Berkshire Hathaway Annual Meeting,” edited by Lawrence Cunningham and Stephanie Cuba. (Cunningham Cuba LLC & Harriman House Ltd., 242 pages, $25)

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FAN 181 (First Amendment News) Tomorrow: Argument in S. Dist. N.Y. Ct. — Lawsuit Challenging President’s Blocking of Critics on Twitter

President Trump’s Twitter account, @realDonaldTrump, has become an important source of news and information about the government, and an important public forum for speech by, to, and about the President. In an effort to suppress dissent in this forum, Defendants have excluded—“blocked”—Twitter users who have criticized the President or his policies. This practice is unconstitutional, and this suit seeks to end it.

— Complaint: Knight First Amendment Institute v. Trump

This from the Knight First Amendment Institute: Tomorrow, March 8 at 11 a.m., “the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University and the U.S. Department of Justice will present oral argument in the Knight Institute’s landmark First Amendment challenge to President Trump’s blocking of critics on Twitter. The argument, which is open to the public, will be held before the Hon. Naomi Reice Buchwald at the Daniel Patrick Moynihan U.S. Courthouse in New York City.”

“Last July, the Knight Institute filed suit in the Southern District of New York contending that the @realDonaldTrump account is a “public forum” under the First Amendment and that the president and his subordinates are violating the Constitution by blocking people from the account simply because they have criticized the president or his policies. The suit also contends that the Trump administration is violating the plaintiffs’ First Amendment right to petition the government for redress of grievances.”

Katie Fallow

“The Institute and the Trump administration filed motions for summary judgment in the lawsuit last fall, and this Thursday, Judge Buchwald will hear argument from both parties.”

Counsel for Knight Institute: Jameel Jaffer, the Knight Institute’s executive director, and Katie Fallow, a senior staff attorney at the Institute, will argue before the court, and several plaintiffs in the lawsuit will be in attendance.

For more information about the lawsuit, including the latest filings, go here.

Related: This from First Amendment Watch: President Trump, Other Elected Officials Block ‘Disliked’ Twitter Followers, March 3, 2018

Headline: “Haling The First Amendment: NYC Taxi Authority’s Ad Ban Struck Down”

Over at Forbes, Glenn Lammi writes: Taxicab, livery, black car, and limousine companies in the Big Apple may own the vehicles their employees drive, but they know full well who really controls them: the New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC). Passenger transportation is one of the city’s most heavily regulated businesses, but as a federal district court judge recently reminded TLC, those small business still have constitutional rights.”

“. . . In 2015, media-distribution company Vugo sought to partner with Uber, Lift, and other rideshare company drivers in New York City. Those drivers would download Vugo software onto a tablet device that would be displayed to riders. Vugo would pay each driver 60% of the ad revenue generated from their tablets. Because ridesharing falls into the “other” category of TLC-regulated for-hire vehicles, and TLC made it clear that it would not approve any rideshare drivers’ requests for interior advertising, Vugo could not proceed with its expansion plans. In response, Vugo filed a First Amendment challenge against TLC in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.”

“Southern District Judge Ronnie Abrams held on February 22, 2018 (Vugo v. City of New York) that TLC’s ban abridged Vugo’s commercial-speech rights. . . .”

New First Amendment Group — Speech First  Read More

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FAN 178.1 (First Amendment News) Stanton Foundation — $$$ Funder of First Amendment Causes

Frank Stanton on cover of Time Magazine (Dec. 4, 1950)

When it comes to funding First Amendment causes, few foundations can rival the recent outlays of the Stanton Foundation (a later post will highlight the philanthropic work of Knight Foundation).

In a future post, I welcome the chance to interview some of the fine folks from the Stanton Foundation. Until then, here are a few words about the man and his legacy as embodied in the Stanton Foundation.

The Stanton Foundation was created by Frank Stanton (1908-2006), who is widely regarded as one of the greatest executives in the history of electronic communications and one of the television industry’s founding fathers.

Here is a sampling of some of the First Amendment and related causes the Stanton Foundation has funded:

  1. The Stanton Foundation Media Litigation Fellowship (2018)
  2. Duke wants to train more First Amendment lawyers. Here’s how it plans to do it (2018)
  3. Freedom of Expression Scholars Conference (2018)
  4. 2017-19 Frank Stanton Fellowship: Electronic Frontier Foundation
  5. Cornell Law School Announces Launch of New First Amendment Clinic (2017)
  6. Stanton Foundation grant expands new CWRU Law School lab dedicated to intellectual property and First Amendment issues (2017)
  7. ASU Law establishes First Amendment clinic with gift from the Stanton Foundation (2017)
  8. Does the 1st Amendment Protect Hate Speech on Campus & Online? (2017)
  9. The First Amendment and Hate Speech (National Constitutional Center, 2017)
  10. The State of Financial Disclosure Project (2017)
  11. Journalism professors lead research into future-proofing local TV news (2017)
  12. Rebecca Tushnet joins Harvard Law faculty as Professor of First Amendment Law: Stanton Professor of First Amendment Law (2016)
  13. 2016 Freedom of the Press Awards Dinner
  14. Stanford Law School to Establish First Amendment Professorship with $5 Million Gift (2015)
  15. FIRE Launches First Amendment Online Library (2015) (here too)
  16. Top First Amendment Lawyer to Head MFIA Clinic (2015)
  17. 2015 Richard S. Salant Lecture on Freedom of the Press
  18. SciCheck puts political claims under a microscope (2015)
  19. The Funders Behind the Fact Checkers (2015)
  20. Stanton Foundation Legal Fellowship
  21. Frank Stanton Professor of the First Amendment (Kennedy School of Government)

Snapshot of the man (from NYT obituary, Dec. 26, 2006)

Frank Stanton

“Dr. Stanton bore much of the criticism when Washington objected to CBS News’s coverage of the war in Vietnam and was threatened with jail in 1971. CBS had broadcast an hourlong investigative report called “The Selling of the Pentagon,” about a $30 million campaign by the Defense Department to improve its image, and the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee demanded that he turn over material cut from the program. When he refused to comply, he was called before the committee.”

“He said the order amounted to an infringement of free speech and freedom of the press under the First Amendment. ‘If newsmen are told their notes, films and tapes will be subject to compulsory process so that the government can determine whether the news has been satisfactorily edited,’ he said, ‘the scope, nature and vigor of their news reporting will be inevitably curtailed.'”

YouTube Interviews (Television Academy Foundation)

  1. Executive Frank Stanton on his relationship with Bill Paley
  2. Executive Frank Stanton on “The Selling of the Pentagon
  3. Frank Stanton on Murrow, Severeid, and Klauber of CBS News
  4. Frank Stanton on the blacklist
  5. Executive Frank Stanton on Lyndon Johnson
  6. Frank Stanton on the transition between radio and television

Nadine Strossen on Frank Stanton 

 “Frank was a staunch supporter of the Shorenstein Center and the Kennedy School, retiring here in Boston after he left New York.  In his will, Frank left the bequest that through the Stanton Foundation allowed us to establish the Salant Lecture.  Frank Stanton insisted that this lecture be named not for himself, but for his friend and protégé, Richard Salant.”

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Second Annual Regional Health Law Works-in-Progress Retreat at Seton Hall Law School

Seton Hall Law School’s Center for Health & Pharmaceutical Law & Policy is pleased to announce the Second Annual Regional Health Law Works-in-Progress Retreat, which will be held on February 9, 2018, at Seton Hall Law School in Newark, New Jersey, from 9:30-5:00.  The purpose of the retreat is to give regional health law scholars an opportunity to share their work and exchange ideas in a friendly, informal setting.

This year’s retreat will consist of an in-depth discussion of the following papers:

Leo Beletsky (Northeastern): Expanding and Improving Substance Use Treatment to Respond to the Opioid Crisis: 21st Century Cures Act and its Street-Level Impact
Commentators: Christina Ho (Rutgers); John Jacobi (Seton Hall)

Ximena Benavides Reverditto (Yale) Opioids Overprescribing: A Social, Legal, and Political Analysis of Physicians’ Role in the Opiod Crisis
Commentators: Linda Fentiman (Pace); Gwendolyn Roberts Majette (Cleveland Marshall)

Myrisha Lewis (Howard): Halted Innovation: The Expansion of Federal Jurisdiction over the Human Body and Medical Practice
Commentators: Gaia Bernstein (Seton Hall); Lewis Grossman (American)

Barbara Noah (Western New England): Rational Patient Apathy
Commentators: Marsha Garrison (Brooklyn); Robert S. Olick (SUNY Upstate)

Govind Persad (Johns Hopkins): Adequacy and Equality in Health Insurance Benefit Design
Commentators: Rob Field (Drexel); Jennifer Herbst (Quinnipiac)

Kristin Underhill (Columbia): Perceptions of Protection under Nondiscrimination Laws
Commentators: Craig Konnoth (Colorado); Brian Sheppard (Seton Hall)

REGISTRATION
The retreat is open to anyone with an academic appointment in health law (including professors, fellows, and visitors) in any institution of higher education in the Northeast.  If you are interested in attending, please RSVP to Carl Coleman via email here by February 2.

Draft papers will be circulated by the last week of January, and all attendees will be expected to have read the papers before the retreat.

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FAN 174.2 (First Amendment News) Floyd Abrams Institute: Call for Abstracts for Scholars’ Conference

Call for Abstracts & Participants: Freedom of Expression Scholars Conference

The Floyd Abrams Institute for Freedom of Expression invites applications to participate in the sixth annual Freedom of Expression Scholars Conference (FESC).

 Conference Date: The conference will be held at Yale Law School in New Haven, Connecticut from April 27–29, 2018.

→ Response Date: All those interested in presenting a paper or commenting on a paper respond by February 23, 2018.

At FESC, scholars and practitioners discuss works-in-progress on the freedoms of speech, expression, press, association, petition, and assembly as well as on related issues of knowledge and information policy. FESC has become a fixture on the calendar of leading First Amendment thinkers and scholars nationwide.

The paper titles and attendees from prior conferences are available here:

→ Workshop Sessions: Each accepted paper is assigned to a discussant, who will summarize the paper for the workshop audience, provide feedback, and lead a discussion. Workshop sessions are typically lively discussions among authors, discussants, and participants. Sessions run from Saturday morning through Sunday afternoon, with a welcome dinner on Friday evening. Conference participants are expected to read the papers in advance and to attend the entire conference.

Papers are accepted on a wide array of freedom of expression and information policy topics. Although participation at the conference is by invitation only, we welcome paper proposals from scholars, practitioners, and free speech advocates all over the world. Please feel free to share this call for submissions widely.

→ Abstract Submissions & Due Date: Titles and abstracts of papers should be submitted electronically to Heather Branch no later than February 23, 2018.

→ For Additional Information: Those interested in attending the conference or acting as a discussant should also contact Heather Branch no later than February 23, 2018.

→ Due Date for Completed Papers: Workshop versions of accepted papers will be due on March 30, 2018, so that they can be circulated to discussants and other conference participants.

→ Travel & Accommodations: Participants will ask their home institutions to cover travel expenses. However, thanks to a generous donation from the Stanton Foundation, we are able to offer Abrams Travel Fellowships to cover some of the costs associated flights, lodging, and reasonable travel expenses for presenters and discussants who would not otherwise be able to attend. This fellowship is intended to encourage submissions from junior faculty and lawyers. Should you be invited to participate as an author or discussant, please inform us in your response whether you will require Abrams Travel Fellowship funding.

→ For Additional Information: Re questions: contact Heather Branch.

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Call for Papers: Second Annual Regional Health Law Works-in-Progress Retreat

Seton Hall Law School’s Center for Health & Pharmaceutical Law & Policy is pleased to announce the Second Annual Regional Health Law Works-in-Progress Retreat, which will be held on February 9, 2018, at Seton Hall Law School in Newark, New Jersey, from approximately 10:00-4:00.  The purpose of the retreat is to give area health law scholars an opportunity to share their work and exchange ideas in a friendly, informal setting.  The retreat is open to anyone with an academic appointment in health law (including professors, fellows, and visitors) in any institution of higher education in the Northeast area (broadly defined to include Washington D.C. and all points north).

The retreat will consist of an in-depth discussion of approximately 5-6 draft papers.  For each paper, a commentator will provide a 10-15 minute overview, as well as his or her reactions.  The author will then have 5 minutes to respond, after which the floor will be opened for a general discussion among all retreat participants.

If you are interested in having your paper presented, please submit a preliminary draft or, if that is not possible, a detailed abstract, no later than November 17, 2017, to carl.coleman@shu.edu.  You will be notified whether your paper has been selected for presentation by December 15.  Final drafts will be due on January 19, 2018.  Drafts will be made available to all participants on a password-protected website.

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Introducing the Equality Law Scholars’ Forum & Call for Proposals

In the spirit of academic engagement and mentoring in the area of Equality Law, we (Tristin Green, University of San Francisco; Angela Onwuachi-Willig, UC Berkeley; and Leticia Saucedo, UC Davis) introduce the Equality Law Scholars’ Forum to be held this Fall. This Scholars’ Forum seeks to provide junior scholars with commentary and critique and to provide scholars at all career stages the opportunity to engage with new scholarly currents and ideas. We hope to bring together scholars with varied perspectives (e.g., critical race theory, class critical theory, feminist legal theory, law and economics, law and society) across fields (e.g., criminal system, education, employment, family, health, immigration, property, tax) and with work relevant to many diverse identities (e.g., age, class, disability, national origin, race, sex, sexuality) to build bridges and to generate new ideas in the area of Equality Law.

We will select three to four relatively junior scholars (untenured, newly tenured, or prospective professors) to present papers from proposals submitted in response to this Call for Proposals. In so doing, we will select papers that cover a broad range of topics within the area of Equality Law. Leading senior scholars will provide commentary on each of the featured papers in an intimate and collegial setting. The Equality Law Scholars’ Forum will pay transportation and accommodation expenses for participants and will host a dinner on Friday evening.

This year’s Forum will be held on November 17, 2017 at Berkeley Law School.

Junior scholars are invited to submit abstracts of proposed papers, 3-5 pages in length, by July 14, 2017.

Full drafts must be available for circulation to participants by October 27, 2017.

Proposals should be submitted to: Tristin Green, USF School of Law, tgreen4@usfca.edu. Electronic submissions via email are preferred.

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Call for Papers: LatCrit XXI Biennial Conference

LatCrit XXI Biennial Conference

2016 ELECTION: WHAT NEXT?

ORLANDO, FL

 

LATCRIT/SALT JUNIOR FACULTY DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP SEP. 28, 2017

BIENNIAL CONFERENCE: SEP. 29 – 30

BOARD MEETING (COMMUNITY & EXECUTIVE SESSIONS) OCT. 1, 2017

The 2016 election, with its surreal outcome, has revealed how hyper-nationalism, white supremacy, misogyny, homophobia, xenophobia, oligarchy, and hate are essential to the mainstream conservative movements. The masking of these trends behind such double-speak as the “Alt-right movement,” has also emboldened those who seek to promote violent forms of intolerance to step out of the shadows and into the light. The poor and economically marginalized struggle with increasingly exploitative neoliberal forms of welfare, privatized for the profit and protection of the powerful financial class. The fight against these powerful forces, in the classroom, in the courtroom, and in our daily lives, has poured into the streets as we struggle to survive the onslaught of executive orders, legislation, and appointments designed to divide and conquer the democratic process. In the current dark days and in the face of previously unfathomable challenges, the bonds of solidarity and community must be nourished. At the Twenty-First Biennial LatCrit Conference, critical scholars will gather in Orlando, Florida to address the current challenges to our diverse communities. For that reason, we invite papers, panels, roundtables, workshops and works in progress across disciplinary boundaries and from all constituencies, among others, on the following questions: How do we deal with the forces that shaped the last election? What does true solidarity require in terms of organizing and mobilizing? How do we move forward, centering systematic injustice, preserving hard won gains from our ancestors, and forging ahead into the future for justice? How do we use our best talents for the struggle? What is the role of empathy and education moving forward? 

Paper, Panel, Roundtable, Workshop proposals & WIPS on other topics related to subordination and resistance are also welcome.

 

DEADLINE: Please submit an abstract and your contact info by May 15, 2017 through: HTTP://LATCRIT.ORG/LATCRIT2017-ONLINE-SUBMISSION-FORM/

 

For general information and questions about the event please email Saru Matambanadzo at smatamba@tulane.edu.

WWW.LATCRIT.ORG

LATCRIT.INC@GMAIL.COM

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Major Contracts Symposium at GW

qtq80-Sh2bmhDivergence and Reform in the Common Law of Contracts is the title of this year’s GW Law Review Symposium and anyone interested in contracts and/or comparative law will want to join us for it on  Saturday November 19.  Here is a summary from the official web site for the event (RSVP here):

This Symposium continues a tradition of biennial conferences that began at the University of Sheffield, UK in 2011, followed by a conference held at the University of Edinburgh in 2013. But this 2016 Symposium is not your grandfather’s contract law. Instead, this conference takes a 21st Century approach to comparative issues in contract law, examining the most pressing controversies, debates, and challenges currently shaping the United States and United Kingdom’s shared legal tradition in the area of common law contracts.

Symposium papers from the previous two gatherings have been published as books by Cambridge U. Press and Oxford U. Press; papers from the current symposium will be published in the GW Law Review.

Topics include: Comparative Law and Reform; The Share Economy; Remedies; The State of the Interpretation Debate; Good Faith; and Consumer Contracts

Participants include:

Miriam Cherry, St. Louis U.

Lawrence Cunningham, GWU

Larry DiMatteo,  U. Florida

Hon. Lord Hodge, UK Supreme Court

Martin Hogg, Edinburgh

Geraint Howells, City U. Hong Kong

Judge Barbara Keenan, 4th Circuit Court of Appeals

Judge Carlos Lucero, 10th Circuit Court of Appeals

Blake Morant, GWU

James Nehf,  Indiana U.

Robert Stevens,  Oxford U.

Matthias Storme, KU Leuven

Rolf Weber, U. Zurich

 

 

 

 

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Health Law Retreat Call for Works-in-Progress

Seton Hall Law School’s Center for Health & Pharmaceutical Law & Policy is pleased to announce the inaugural Mid-Atlantic Health Law Works-in-Progress Retreat, which will be held on February 10, 2017, at Seton Hall Law School in Newark, New Jersey. The purpose of the retreat is to give regional health law scholars an opportunity to share their work and exchange ideas in a friendly, informal setting. The retreat is open to anyone with an academic appointment in health law (including professors, fellows, and visitors) in any institution of higher education in the mid-Atlantic area.

The retreat will consist of an in-depth discussion of approximately 5-6 draft papers. A designated commentator will first provide a 10-15 minute overview of each paper, as well as his or her reactions. The author will then have 5 minutes to respond, following which all retreat participants will participate in a general discussion of the draft.

Persons interested in having their papers presented should submit a preliminary draft or, if that is not possible, a detailed abstract, no later than November 18 to Carl Coleman at Seton Hall Law School. Papers to be presented will be selected by December 9, and final drafts will be due on January 20. Drafts will be made available to all participants on a password-protected website.