Author: Christine Corcos

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Law and Humanities Roundup: Holiday Edition 12.14.18

Still Need Ideas for Holiday Gifts?

What about a “Decision Paperweight”? Eighteen dollars at Uncommon Goods. What about a first edition of John Jay Osborn’s The Paper Chase? I love what the Unemployed Philosopher’s Guild has on offer, including the Supreme Court Cases Mug and the Banned Books Mug. The National Archives sells a Declaration of Independence silk scarf ($60). You can also check out sites such as Etsy and eBay for interesting items; I’ve found lovely Brooke Cadwallader Declaration of Independence silk scarves, a scarf related to the famous Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins case, and other items. I collect scarves so those are the items I look for, but there are lots of mugs, pens, pins, ties, paperweights, bookends, decks of cards, first editions, gavels, lamps, and other things that would make any legal eagle chirp happily. I even found a lovely small watercolor of Alexis de Tocqueville on Etsy a couple of weeks ago; I snapped that up immediately.

New Publications

Here’s a book to put on your holiday shopping list for lawyers and law students on your list this holiday season: Laura Little’s Guilty Pleasures: Comedy and Law in America (Oxford University Press (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Few people associate law books with humor. Yet the legal world–in particular the American legal system–is itself frequently funny. Indeed, jokes about the profession are staples of American comedy. And there is actually humor within the world of law too: both lawyers and judges occasionally strive to be funny to deal with the drudgery of their duties. Just as importantly, though, our legal system is a strong regulator of humor. It encourages some types of humor while muzzling or punishing others. In a sense, law and humor engage a two-way feedback loop: humor provides the raw material for legal regulation and legal regulation inspires humor. In Guilty Pleasures, legal scholar Laura Little provides a multi-faceted account of American law and humor, looking at constraints on humor (and humor’s effect on law), humor about law, and humor in law. In addition to interspersing amusing episodes from the legal world throughout the book, the book contains 75 New Yorker cartoons about lawyers and a preface by Bob Mankoff, the cartoon editor for the New Yorker.

 

 

Cover for Guilty Pleasures

 

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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 07.11.18

News from the world of law and humanities.

Some Conferences, Calls for Papers, and Calls for Panelists

Conferences

The Critical Legal Conference 2018 takes place at The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK, September 6-8, 2018. Registration is now open. More here at the Conference webpage.

 

The LSAANZ (Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand) Conference 2018 will take place December 12-15, 2018, at the University of Wollongong. 

The call for abstracts is open until July 20, 2018. 

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Call for Contributions: New Open Access Peer-Review Website

The new open access website https://hedgehogsandfoxes.org/ is issuing a call for essays, articles, interviews, book reviews, teaching resources, photographs, poems, and other materials related to the study of law and the humanities (broadly defined). All publications are peer-reviewed. As you can see, we are just getting started and will be making changes to the design of the website over the next few weeks. If you are interested in publishing with us, please keep us in mind. For more information, or to inquire about publication, please send an email to a member of the Board:

ccorcos at lsu.edu

sghosh01 at law.syr.edu

david.papke at marquette.edu

csharp at uow.edu.au

 

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Roundup: Law and Humanities 12.21.2017

News from the world of law and humanities.

Some Conferences, Calls for Papers, and Calls for Panelists

Conferences

The 2018 Annual Meeting of the the Association of American Law Schools takes place in San Diego from January 3 to January 6, 2018. As always, there are  sessions of interest to law and humanities folks. Here are a few.

January 3, 2018

1:30-3:15     Admiralty and Maritime Law, Co-sponsored by the Art Law and International Law sections. “Sunken Treasure: Recovery of Cultural Property from Historic Shipwrecks.”

6:30-9 p.m.     AALS Law and Film Series. The feature film selection this year is “My Cousin Vinny” (1992). This well-known film stars Joe Pesci as the cousin Vinny of the title, called on to defend his young cousin from a murder charge in rural Alabama. Although Vinny has just passed the bar (after 6 tries), and has never represented anyone in court, he takes on the case, with the help of his girlfriend Mona Lisa Vito (Marisa Tomei). Fred Gwynne is the bemused judge (“What was that word? Did you say ‘yutes’?”) The movie is well known among law professors, lawyers, judges, and the public for its depiction of attorneys, trial tactics, legal ethics, and the legal system.

January 4, 2018

12:15-1:30   Constitutional Law and Legal History Joint Luncheon. Ticket price $75 per person.

1:30-3:15   AALS Open Source Program: Visual and Popular Culture Imagery in Legal Education. Six professors discuss the place of law and popular culture courses in the law school curriculum.

January 5, 2018

6:30-9 p.m.     AALS Law and Film Series. The documentary film selection this year is “Gideon’s Army” (2013). This film follows the journeys of 3 young public defenders in the deep South as they attempt to provide representation to the underserved. Anong those spotlighted: Jonathan Rapping, now a professor at Atlanta’s John Marshall Law School.

January 6, 2018

8:30-10:15     Jurisprudence:  Philosophy, Criminal Law, and the Present Crisis

8:30-10:15    Law and the Humanities: Blade Runners, Hosts, and Lawyers: Communicating Images of Access to Rights and Justice for Robots and Other Artificial Intelligence

Link to the program at-a-glance here.

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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 10.20.17

Some news from the world of law and humanities.

Some Conferences, Calls for Papers, and Calls for Panelists

 

The American Constitutional Society for Law and Policy,  Barry University Law School Student Chapter, and Texas A&M University School of Law are hosting the Third Annual Constitutional Law Scholars Forum at Barry University School of Law in Orlando, FL, March 2, 2018.

Here is a link to the Call for Papers. The deadline to submit is December 1, 2017.

The Constitutional Law Scholars Forum invites scholarly proposals on constitutional law at any stage of pre-publication development, from the germination of an idea to the editing stage.  The Forum provides an opportunity for scholars and educators to vet their work-in-progress in a welcoming, supportive environment.  (The Forum is not accepting proposals from students at this time.)

Barry University School of Law is located within close proximity to recreational activities: Universal Studios, Disney World, Epcot Center, Sea World, world class golf courses, and beaches.  Orlando offers an average temperature of 78°F in March/April.

There are no conference fees and meals are provided, but participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses.

Abstract Submissions:

Email proposals to Professor Eang Ngov, engov@barry.edu, with “Constitutional Law Scholars Forum” in the subject line.  Submissions should include a short abstract (300 words maximum) and biography (150 words maximum).

Conference Organizers: 

Professor Eang Ngov, engov@barry.edu, office (321) 206 -5677, cell phone (571) 643-2691;   Professor Meg Penrose, megpenrose@law.tamu.edu.

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Call For Papers: Cities as Ill Bodies in Films and Series

From Anne Wagner, Associate Professor, EIC of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law, and Co-Editor of the Series “Law, Language and Communication”

City is a living organism. It is built around a centre – the heart – that provides wealth, prosperity and work to citizens (i.e. the business centre). Transportation arteries are constructed to cut traffic congestion and to facilitate the link between dormitory rings and the business centre. City is like a living monster. It needs expansion, exposure, recognition, security and regeneration. City suffers. Congestion is far too important and the lack of security is the core issue for the Town Hall and its inhabitants. The most urgent matter concerns the close link between the regeneration of cities and their environment in order to maintain peace, comfort, discretion and visibility for all. City is an ill body with signs and symptoms that need to be treated and cured to restore its utility value to its inhabitants. The overall aim of a City is to guarantee simultaneously and paradoxically a high level of individual freedom and an order in which such freedom is made possible and guaranteed.

The intersections of Films/Series and Law represent a significant and prospective research. This edited volume will seek to explore the perception of cities in Films and Series worldwide. It will encourage a plurality of approaches for the understanding and practice of justice, morality and protection of citizens. Contributors may choose to explore semiotic, rhetorical, pragmatic, sociolinguistic, legal, psychological, philosophical and/or visual perspectives on Cities as ill bodies.

This edited volume could explore (but is not limited to) the richly complex manifestations of Cities as ill bodies in the following ways:

– What is an ill city? (State disorder, lawless cities, rebellion, revenge, etc.)

– How is provided the atmosphere in “ill cities”?

– How are power structures and citizens represented?

– What are the aesthetic and visual processes?

– How is organized the screenplay?

– How is captured the ideas of “peace”, “security”, “comfort”, “visibility”, “discretion” and/or “regeneration” in Films and Series?

– How does law try to regulate “cities as ill bodies”?

– What are the investigated related approaches to deal with violence, rights, justice, morality, sovereignty, or any other relevant field?

Submission information:

Email submission to Anne Wagner (valwagnerfr@yahoo.com)

Abstracts of 300 words (max.) can be submitted by 28 February 2018 to Anne Wagner with decisions made by March 2018.

Full papers of 25 000 words (max) will have to be sent by September 2018 with final decisions by November 2018.

 

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Roundup: Law and Humanities 04.11.2017

New in the world of law and the humanities/law and popular culture:

Conferences: Call for Papers

Call for papers for an AALS Section of Law and the Humanities panel at the 2018 Annual Meeting, San Diego, January 3-January 6, 2018,  on the theme of the image of robots and AI in the humanities, communication, film, tv, art, commercials, philosophy, and related disciplines. Should robots and AI have rights? If so what rights?

Please send expressions of interest, your affiliation, and a short description (100-250 words) of the proposed paper by May 15, 2017 to
Christine Corcos (christine.corcos@law.lsu.edu)

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The American Society of Comparative Law and American University College of Law invite all interested scholars to consider submitting a panel proposal for the upcoming Annual Meeting of the American Society of Comparative Law that will be held between Thursday, October 26, and Saturday, October 28, 2017, at American University Washington College of Law, Washington D.C.  entitled Comparative law, Faith and Religion:  The Role of Faith in Law.

The Annual Meeting Committee of the American Society of Comparative Law will select the panels that will be held at the meeting in consultation with American University Washington College of Law. Panel proposals should include up to four speakers, a panel title, and a one-to-two-paragraph description of the ideas that the panel will explore. Panel proposals should be submitted via e-mail to Tra Pham at tpham@wcl.american.edu of American University Washington College of Law no later than June 1, 2017, and copied to Máximo Langer from the American Society of Comparative law at langer@law.ucla.edu.

Any questions about the panel proposals should be addressed to Máximo Langer and copied to Fernanda Nicola (fnicola@wcl.american.edu) and Padideh Alai (palai@wcl.american.edu).

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AALS Law and Film Selections At This Year’s Meeting @TheAALS @MacheteCine

The two AALS Law & Film selections at this year’s meeting in San Francisco are Anatomy of a Murder, Tuesday evening at 7 p.m.,and La Jaula de Oro, Thursday evening at 6:30. I will moderate the discussion for Anatomy of a Murder, the classic courtroom drama about the quest for the truth behind an Army lieutenant’s killing of the man he accuses of raping his wife.  Michael Olivas, Professor of Law, University of Houston Law Center, and a former AALS President, will moderate the discussion for La Jaula de Oro, a striking Mexican film about Central American undocumented immigrants and their dangerous journey to the United States. Special guest for the Thursday night presentation is the film’s producer, Luis Salinas. William S. Hein and Company is providing refreshments for both evenings.

Come find out why law and film matters!

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Roundup: Law and Humanities 10.13.2016

In somewhat of an October surprise, the Swedish Academy has announced the award of the Nobel Prize for Literature to singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. Law and humanities mavens, take note: scholars and commentators have been examining Laureate Dylan’s work for links to the law for some time.

The New York Times’ Adam Liptak surveyed the uses of Bob Dylan lyrics in judicial opinions here, listing some here.

Some lawprofs have written about Mr. Dylan’s use of law and legal themes. Here are some examples.

Adam Gearey, Outlaw Blues: Law in the Songs of Bob Dylan, 20 Cardozo Law Review 1401 (1998/1999).

Matthew McNeil, The First Amendment Out on Highway 61: Bob Dylan, RLUIPA, and the Problem with Emerging Postmodern Religion Clauses Jurisprudence, 65 Ohio State Law Journal 1021 (2004).

 

See also music scholar James Dunlap, Through the Eyes of Tom Joad: Patterns of American Idealism, Bob Dylan, and the Folk Protest Movement, 29 Popular Music and Society 549 (2006).

 

The Fordham Urban Law Journal devotes an entire issue to Bob Dylan and the law (38 Fordham Urban Law Journal 2010-2011). The issue includes (complete with poetic titles):

Samuel J. Levine, Foreword, at 1267.

Louise Harmon, Bob Dylan on Lenny Bruce: More of an Outlaw Than You Ever Were, at 1287.

Renee Newman Knake,  Why the Law Needs Music: Revisiting NAACP v. Button Through the Songs of Bob Dylan, at 1303.

Randy Lee, Bob Dylan’s Lawyers, a Dark Day in Luzerne County, and Learning to Take Legal Ethics Seriously, at 1323.

Alex B. Long, The Freewheeling’ Judiciary: A Bob Dylan Anthology, at 1363.

Alex Lubet, Arrested Development: Bob Dylan, Held for Questioning Under Suspicion of “Autism,” at 1385.

Michael Perlin, Tangled Up in the Law: The Jurisprudence of Bob Dylan, at 1395.

Laurie Serafino, Life Cycles of American Legal History Through Bob Dylan’s Eyes, at 1431.

Abbe Smith, “No Older ‘N Seventeen”: Defending in Dylan County, at 1471.

Richard H. Underwood, When the Law Doesn’t Work, at 1495.

David M. Zornow, Dylan’s Judgment on Judges: Power and Greed and Corruptible Seed Seem To Be All That There Is, at 1511.

 

Idealawg discusses some of Mr. Dylan’s lawprof fans here.

 

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Roundup: Law and Humanities 06.28.16

 

Conferences

 

Call For Papers: 2016 Law & Society Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference

Disruption, Temporality, Law:
The Future of Law and Society Scholarship

2016 Conference of the Law & Society Association of Australia and New Zealand

30th November – 3rd December 2016

Call for Papers closes: 30th June 2016

The Call for Papers for the 2016 Law & Society Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference, hosted by the Law Futures Centre and Griffith Law School in conjunction with the Southern Cross University School of Law and Justice closes on the 30th June 2016. Details of the call for papers are attached.

We are also pleased to announce the following confirmed keynote speakers:

  • Professor William MacNeil, The Hon John Dowd Chair in Law, Dean and Head, School of Law and Social Justice, Southern Cross University
  • Professor Irene Watson, Research Professor of Law, School of Law, University of South Australia
  • More keynote announcements to come!

The conference will open on the evening of Wednesday 30th November with a public debate on “The Future of Legal Education”. Confirmed debate participants include:

  • Professor Margaret Thornton, ANU College of Law, Australian National University
  • Bill Potts, President, Queensland Law Society & Founding Director, Potts Lawyers
  • John Briton, Former Legal Services Commissioner, Queensland
  • Professor Reid Mortensen, Head of School, School of Law and Justice, University of Southern Queensland
  • Magistrate Jacqui Payne, Queensland Courts
  • Professor Charles Sampford, Director of the Institute for Ethics, Governance and Law, Griffith University

Submission of Proposals:

Please submit proposals for papers, panels or streams to LSAANZ2016@griffith.edu.au. Proposals should consist of a short abstract (max. 250 words), 3 keywords and a short biography (100 words). Panel proposals should include a title/theme for the panel, and abstracts, keywords and biographies for each presenter.

We looking forward to welcoming you to Brisbane.

The 2016 Conference Organising Committee.

Professor John Flood, Dr Timothy Peters, Dr Edwin Bikundo, Mr Shahram Dana, Dr Roshan de Silva Wijeyeratne, Associate Professor Susan Harris-Rimmer, Ms Heron Loban, Dr Jennifer Nielsen, Professor Charles Sampford and Ms Kandice Cherrie.

For Conference enquiries email: LSAANZ2016@griffith.edu.au

 

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Roundup: Law and Humanities 06.20.16

So much going on in law and humanities these days that it’s hard to pick and choose what to bring you. Here’s a sampling.

Conferences

There will be a Conference on Law and Ritual September 22-23, 2016 Leeuwarden, The Netherlands, sponsored by Voices of Law.

Here is a link to the conference website.

Follow news of the conference on Twitter:  #LawAndRitual @VoicesofLaw

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The organizers of the LSU Conference on Law, Authorship, and Appropriation are still accepting paper proposals for the Conference, which will take place at LSU A&M, Baton Rouge, on October 28 and 29, 2016. The original call (with updated dates) is reproduced below.

Call for Papers

By Any Other’s Name: A Conference on Law, Authorship, and Appropriation

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, October 28-29, 2016

On October 28-29, 2016, the LSU College of Music and Dramatic Arts, LSU School of Theatre, the LSU Law Center, LSU’s ORED (Office of Research and Economic Development) and the Law and Humanities Institute will co-sponsor a conference on law, authorship, and appropriation on the LSU A and M campus in Baton Rouge, LA. This conference will bring together scholars, performers, and students to discuss law and authorship in the face of challenges issued by artists who engage in appropriation—the practice of taking the works of others to rethink or recreate new works.

Some artists who engage in appropriation may describe their activities as parody, sampling, or remixing. Some artists whose work is appropriated may describe the result as misappropriation. Writers might describe the use or reuse of words variously as hommage or plagiarism. Lawyers weigh in both sides of the issue, interpreting such reuse as fair use or infringement, depending on the circumstances.

Digital technology creates a host of new considerations, from the opportunity for a creator to license rights up-front (or not at all) to opportunities for users to create content cooperatively, either on the Web or in face-to-face settings.

What do such changes, in law and in aesthetics and art, mean for our understandings of authorship and the relationship between creator and audience? Do words like “author” and “creator” even continue to have meaning?

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Roundup: Law and Humanities 05.18.16

What’s new in the world of law and humanities:

Conferences

Call for Papers

By Any Other’s Name: A Conference on Law, Authorship, and Appropriation

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, October 28-29, 2016

On October 28-29, 2016, the LSU College of Music and Dramatic Arts, LSU School of Theatre, the LSU Law Center, LSU’s ORED (Office of Research and Economic Development) and the Law and Humanities Institute will co-sponsor a conference on law, authorship, and appropriation on the LSU A and M campus in Baton Rouge, LA. This conference will bring together scholars, performers, and students to discuss law and authorship in the face of challenges issued by artists who engage in appropriation—the practice of taking the works of others to rethink or recreate new works.

Some artists who engage in appropriation may describe their activities as parody, sampling, or remixing. Some artists whose work is appropriated may describe the result as misappropriation. Writers might describe the use or reuse of words variously as hommage or plagiarism. Lawyers weigh in both sides of the issue, interpreting such reuse as fair use or infringement, depending on the circumstances.

Digital technology creates a host of new considerations, from the opportunity for a creator to license rights up-front (or not at all) to opportunities for users to create content cooperatively, either on the Web or in face-to-face settings.

What do such changes, in law and in aesthetics and art, mean for our understandings of authorship and the relationship between creator and audience? Do words like “author” and “creator” even continue to have meaning?

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