FAN 199.1 (First Amendment News) Two New Podcasts — Dissent in the Era of the Gutenberg Press & Free Speech in the Robotic Era

Two new podcasts — the subjects which are separated in time but not in concept — address the relationship between the modes of communication and censorship.  The first is a Clear & Present Danger podcast by Jacob Mchangama entitled The Great Disruption – Part II. The second is a So to Speak podcast narrated by Nico Perrino entitled Robotica: Speech Rights & Artificial Intelligence and consists of an interview with Ronald Collins and David Skover.

In episode 11 we continue to survey the wreckage after hurricane Luther was unleashed on Europe with the Reformation. When the Reformation mutated and spread across the continent a burning question arose: Can people of different faiths live together in the same state? Should social peace be based on tolerance or intolerance? We look into questions such as

  • How did other Protestant reformers like Calvin and Zwingli react to religious dissent?
  • In what manner did English and continental censorship laws differ?
  • How did the Catholic Church react to the Reformation?
  • Which states were the first to formalize religious tolerance?
  • How did the scientific and philosophical ideas of Galileo and Giordano Bruno conflict with the religious monopoly on truth and what were the repercussions?

___________________So to Speak podcast_______________________

David Skover (left), Ronald Collins (center) & Nico Perrino (right)

On this episode of So to Speak: The Free Speech Podcast, we are joined by First Amendment scholars Ronald Collins and David Skover. They are the authors of the new book, Robotica: Speech Rights & Artificial Intelligence.

From the printing press to the internet, advances in communications technology often upset the established order and spawn demands for censorship. There is little reason to suspect advances in artificial intelligence will be treated differently. As free speech advocates, how should we respond to these demands?

To answer that question, Collins and Skover argue that we need to take a step back and ask some more fundamental questions about the values we seek to advance in protecting speech in the first place.

___________________Make No Law podcast_______________________

Everyone loves a good redemption story. Maybe that’s because it helps us believe it’s never too late to change. But how does the same Justice who decided Schenck v. United States, a low point for First Amendment jurisprudence, become the ultimate source of famous First Amendment concepts and rhetoric?

In this episode of Make No Law, the First Amendment Podcast by Popehat.com, host Ken White explores Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes’s transformation into the First Amendment hero we know him as today. To do this, Ken discusses the Sedition Act of 1918, Holmes’s dissent in United States v. Abrams, and the discourse with his friends and colleagues that ultimately swayed his opinion on free speech. He also talks to Professor Thomas Healy, First Amendment and constitutional law professor at Seton Hall and author of The Great Dissent: How Oliver Wendell Holmes Changed His Mind And Changed The History Of Free Speech In America.

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