ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 10.20.17

Some news from the world of law and humanities.

Some Conferences, Calls for Papers, and Calls for Panelists

 

The American Constitutional Society for Law and Policy,  Barry University Law School Student Chapter, and Texas A&M University School of Law are hosting the Third Annual Constitutional Law Scholars Forum at Barry University School of Law in Orlando, FL, March 2, 2018.

Here is a link to the Call for Papers. The deadline to submit is December 1, 2017.

The Constitutional Law Scholars Forum invites scholarly proposals on constitutional law at any stage of pre-publication development, from the germination of an idea to the editing stage.  The Forum provides an opportunity for scholars and educators to vet their work-in-progress in a welcoming, supportive environment.  (The Forum is not accepting proposals from students at this time.)

Barry University School of Law is located within close proximity to recreational activities: Universal Studios, Disney World, Epcot Center, Sea World, world class golf courses, and beaches.  Orlando offers an average temperature of 78°F in March/April.

There are no conference fees and meals are provided, but participants are expected to pay their own travel expenses.

Abstract Submissions:

Email proposals to Professor Eang Ngov, engov@barry.edu, with “Constitutional Law Scholars Forum” in the subject line.  Submissions should include a short abstract (300 words maximum) and biography (150 words maximum).

Conference Organizers: 

Professor Eang Ngov, engov@barry.edu, office (321) 206 -5677, cell phone (571) 643-2691;   Professor Meg Penrose, megpenrose@law.tamu.edu.

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Call For Papers: Cities as Ill Bodies in Films and Series

From Anne Wagner, Associate Professor, EIC of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law, and Co-Editor of the Series “Law, Language and Communication”

City is a living organism. It is built around a centre – the heart – that provides wealth, prosperity and work to citizens (i.e. the business centre). Transportation arteries are constructed to cut traffic congestion and to facilitate the link between dormitory rings and the business centre. City is like a living monster. It needs expansion, exposure, recognition, security and regeneration. City suffers. Congestion is far too important and the lack of security is the core issue for the Town Hall and its inhabitants. The most urgent matter concerns the close link between the regeneration of cities and their environment in order to maintain peace, comfort, discretion and visibility for all. City is an ill body with signs and symptoms that need to be treated and cured to restore its utility value to its inhabitants. The overall aim of a City is to guarantee simultaneously and paradoxically a high level of individual freedom and an order in which such freedom is made possible and guaranteed.

The intersections of Films/Series and Law represent a significant and prospective research. This edited volume will seek to explore the perception of cities in Films and Series worldwide. It will encourage a plurality of approaches for the understanding and practice of justice, morality and protection of citizens. Contributors may choose to explore semiotic, rhetorical, pragmatic, sociolinguistic, legal, psychological, philosophical and/or visual perspectives on Cities as ill bodies.

This edited volume could explore (but is not limited to) the richly complex manifestations of Cities as ill bodies in the following ways:

– What is an ill city? (State disorder, lawless cities, rebellion, revenge, etc.)

– How is provided the atmosphere in “ill cities”?

– How are power structures and citizens represented?

– What are the aesthetic and visual processes?

– How is organized the screenplay?

– How is captured the ideas of “peace”, “security”, “comfort”, “visibility”, “discretion” and/or “regeneration” in Films and Series?

– How does law try to regulate “cities as ill bodies”?

– What are the investigated related approaches to deal with violence, rights, justice, morality, sovereignty, or any other relevant field?

Submission information:

Email submission to Anne Wagner (valwagnerfr@yahoo.com)

Abstracts of 300 words (max.) can be submitted by 28 February 2018 to Anne Wagner with decisions made by March 2018.

Full papers of 25 000 words (max) will have to be sent by September 2018 with final decisions by November 2018.

 

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Some Publications of Interest


Nahel Asfour, Tel-Aviv University, has published Wrongful Enrichment: A Study in Comparative Law and Culture (Hart Publishing, 2017)(International Studies in the Theory of Private Law).  Here is a description of the book’s contents.

This book analyses enrichment law and its development and underpinning in social culture within three geographical regions: the United States, western members of the European Union and the late Ottoman Empire. These regions correspond, though imperfectly, with three different legal traditions: the American, continental and Islamic traditions.

The book argues that we should understand law as a mimetic artefact. In so doing, it explains how typical patterns and exemplary articulations of wrongful enrichment law capture and reiterate vocal cultural themes found in the respective regions. The book identifies remarkable affinities between poetic tendencies, structures and default dispositions of wrongful enrichment law and cultural world views. It offers bold accounts of each region’s law and culture providing fertile grounds for external and comparative elucidations of the legal doctrine.

Sheryll Cashin, Georgetown Law, has published Loving: Interracial Intimacy in America and the Threat To White Supremacy (Beacon Press, 2017). Here is a description of the book’s contents.

Loving beyond boundaries is a radical act that is changing America. When Mildred and Richard Loving wed in 1958, they were ripped from their shared bed and taken to court. Their crime: miscegenation, punished by exile from their home state of Virginia. The resulting landmark decision of Loving v. Virginia ended bans on interracial marriage and remains a signature case—the first to use the words “white supremacy” to describe such racism. Drawing from the earliest chapters in US history, legal scholar Sheryll Cashin reveals the enduring legacy of America’s original sin, tracing how we transformed from a country without an entrenched construction of race to a nation where one drop of nonwhite blood merited exclusion from full citizenship. In vivid detail, she illustrates how the idea of whiteness was created by the planter class of yesterday and is reinforced by today’s power-hungry dog-whistlers to divide struggling whites and people of color, ensuring plutocracy and undermining the common good. Cashin argues that over the course of the last four centuries there have been “ardent integrators” and that those people are today contributing to the emergence of a class of “culturally dexterous” Americans. In the fifty years since the Lovings won their case, approval for interracial marriage rose from 4 percent to 87 percent. Cashin speculates that rising rates of interracial intimacy—including cross-racial adoption, romance, and friendship—combined with immigration, demographic, and generational change, will create an ascendant coalition of culturally dexterous whites and people of color. Loving is both a history of white supremacy and a hopeful treatise on the future of race relations in America, challenging the notion that trickle-down progressive politics is our only hope for a more inclusive society. Accessible and sharp, Cashin reanimates the possibility of a future where interracial understanding serves as a catalyst of a social revolution ending not in artificial color blindness but in a culture where acceptance and difference are celebrated.

TV and film have told the Lovings’ story several times, most recently in the 2016 film Loving, for which Ruth Negga (Mildred Loving) received an Oscar nomination for Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role. In 1996, Timothy Hutton and Lela Rochon starred in the TV movie Mr. and Mrs. Loving. The HBO documentary The Loving Story also looks at the case and its background.
Janny H. C. Leung, University of Hong Kong, has published Publicity Stunts, Power Play, and Information Warfare in Mediatized Public Confessions, at 11 Law and Humanities 82 (2017). Here is the abstract.
Confession has for centuries been known as the queen of evidence. This paper examines an unusual type of confessions – ones that are made in public and out of court, the main target audience of which is not legal enforcement or court officers but the generic public. Operating in the margins of law, these confessions may make legal procedures redundant. Through analysing three recent public confessions from different jurisdictions that are mediatized and spectacularized, this paper asks what these confessions communicate, what motivations states have in staging them and how such confessions may be understood in relation to the modern communication environment today. In particular, I highlight narrative inconsistencies in these confessions and consider whether they affect their communicative functions.
New from Routledge: The Routledge Research Companion to Law and Humanities in Nineteenth-Century America, edited by Nan Goodman and Simon Stern (2017). Here is a description of the book’s contents from the publisher’s website.
Nineteenth-century America witnessed some of the most important and fruitful areas of intersection between the law and humanities, as people began to realize that the law, formerly confined to courts and lawyers, might also find expression in a variety of ostensibly non-legal areas such as painting, poetry, fiction, and sculpture. Bringing together leading researchers from law schools and humanities departments, this Companion touches on regulatory, statutory, and common law in nineteenth-century America and encompasses judges, lawyers, legislators, litigants, and the institutions they inhabited (courts, firms, prisons). It will serve as a reference for specific information on a variety of law- and humanities-related topics as well as a guide to understanding how the two disciplines developed in tandem in the long nineteenth century.
The Australian law and culture magazine Bucket Orange runs a section called “Poplaw.” Included are pieces by Sarah Lynch, who writes on such topics as whether Dracula could be convicted of any crimes under Australian law and criminal activities on the tv series The Walking Dead. If zombie law as a law and popular culture issue is one you’d like to pursue, check out such works as Adam Chodorow’s Death and Taxes and Zombies, 98 Iowa Law Review 1207 (2013) (discussing whether estate and tax laws apply to the undead) 
and Thomas E. Simmons’ What Zombies Can Teach Law Students: Popular Text Inclusion in Law and Literature, 66 Mercer Law Review 729 (2014/2015).

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