Calling All SCOTUS Clerks: Illuminating New Book on the Fourth Amendment and Its Original Meaning as a Guide for Carpenter

On June 5, 2017, the Supreme Court announced that it will review United States v. Carpenter, a case involving long-term, retrospective tracking of a person’s movements using information generated by his cell phone. As EFF’s Andrew Crocker and Jennifer Lynch write, “This is very exciting news in the world of digital privacy. With Carpenter, the Court has an opportunity to continue its recent pattern of applying Fourth Amendment protections to sensitive digital data. It may also limit or even reevaluate the so-called ‘Third Party Doctrine,’ which the government relies on to justify warrantless tracking and surveillance in a variety of contexts.”

SCOTUS clerks will surely be reading much Fourth Amendment literature and caselaw in preparation for their work on the Carpenter case. I’d like to nominate David Gray’s brilliant addition to the canon The Fourth Amendment in an Age of Surveillance (Cambridge University Press 2017).

From the book jacket:

The Fourth Amendment is facing a crisis. New and emerging surveillance technologies allow government agents to track us wherever we go, to monitor our activities online and offline, and to gather massive amounts of information relating to our financial transactions, communications, and social contacts. In addition, traditional police methods like stop-and-frisk have grown out of control, subjecting hundreds of thousands of innocent citizens to routine searches and seizures. In this work, David Gray uncovers the original meaning of the Fourth Amendment to reveal how its historical guarantees of collective security against threats of ‘unreasonable searches and seizures’ can provide concrete solutions to the current crisis. This important work should be read by anyone concerned with the ongoing viability of one of the most important constitutional rights in an age of increasing government surveillance.

Here is a video of Prof. Gray talking about the book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHUNRndaYIo

 

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1 Response

  1. Joe says:

    Interesting.

    His comment in the video about privacy is misguided and overbroad.