Nine to Five Book Symposium

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Concurring Opinions is delighted to introduce Professor Joanna Grossman, and the participants in our online symposium on Nine to Five: How Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Continue to Define the American Workplace (Cambridge University Press 2016).

  Grossman’s important book is an accessible, witty, and opinionated guide to the jurisprudence of sex discrimination that explores laws and policies regulating sex, sexuality, and gender identity in the American workplace. By bringing together almost 60 columns that Grossman has written over the past 15 years for online sites, the book documents the law’s approach to various issues of sex discrimination, including, sexual harassment, pregnancy discrimination, and pay equity. Although each essay was written to address a specific case or legal development (sometimes court cases provide the basis for the column, while other columns start with cultural developments, such as David Letterman’s acknowledgement of his intra-office sexual relationships – “Late–Night Affairs with David Letterman”), Grossman has organized the essays around 4 distinct themes, and has provided introductory and connecting analyses, so the book provides a coherent and cogent approach to sex discrimination. In fact, I am considering assigning it to my feminist legal theory students next semester!   The essays crisply note both the victories and defeats along the road to gender equality. Through the cumulative volume of these columns, we – somewhat painfully — see the obstacles to working women’s equality.

As Nine to Five explores numerous provocative and timely issues about the meaning of gender equality, it also raises questions about the role of law in achieving gender equality. Are Title VII and Title IX and the Equal Protection Clause and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act adequate to challenge pervasive gender role stereotypes? While these laws may have succeeded in opening doors to women in the workplace, can they help women deal with sexual harassment (Part II of the book) and pregnancy discrimination and the maternal wall (Part III) and pay equity and the glass ceiling (Part IV)? To consider these and many other issues raised by Grossman’s book, we have invited an all-star cast of thinkers:  Sam Bagenstos, June Carbone, Nancy Dowd, Jennifer Hendricks, Kate Silbaugh, Gillian Thomas, and Verna Williams.

We look forward to this discussion, and please join in with comments!

 

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