The State of Legal Scholarship: A View from Health Law

Based on Ron Collins’ post below, I read the interview with Judge Edwards. The judge states:

In order for legal scholarship to be relevant outside the legal academy, law professors should balance abstract scholarship with scholarly works that are of interest and use to lawyers, legislators, judges, and regulators who serve society through legal arguments, decision-making, regulatory initiatives, and enforcement actions.

Fortunately, every legal academic that Nicolas Terry and I have hosted in our 41 episodes of The Week in Health Law has done so. Perhaps that’s a biased sample. But it’s undoubtedly better than the sampling practiced by Justice Breyer, another critic of legal scholarship.

For now, I will take some comfort that, about a year into our podcasting, we have heard from general counsels, attorneys, regulators, and journalists who are big fans of the show–which primarily focuses on the work of legal academics. And I will remain dubious of generalized critiques of legal scholarship, which fail to analyze the merits of particular fields.

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