Sometimes the Parties Can Work Together and Even on an Environmental Issue

Given how often we see the utter dysfunction of Congress, when I see a sign of Congress working, it merits calling out. According to the Washington Post, “The Senate has passed a much-anticipated bill proposing broad reforms to an existing chemical safety law — one which environmentalists have long argued puts the American public at unnecessary risk of exposure to toxic substances.” The law, the TSCA, is about 40 years old and requires so much proof of harm that even a substance like asbestos was difficult to regulate let alone ban. Thus “The bill, dubbed the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, [and which] has been in negotiations for more than two years and finally went to a vote Thursday night, where it passed with bipartisan support” is a big step forward. The Post details that some groups dislike parts of the bill, and the House version is less broad, but it too has bipartisan support. If al goes well and the final version has teeth, that would mean both houses and the parties can fix a bill like this one, and that is a great sign.

As a general note, I am curious about the proof standard at issue. If folks who follow this area know what it is or have thoughts on what is should be, please share.

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1 Response

  1. Ken Rhodes says:

    In re the admirable bipartisan approach of Congress in this issue, contrast the questionable action of the EPA:

    http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/watchdog/ct-gmo-crops-pesticide-resistance-met-20151203-story.html