Not Found, Forbidden, or Censored? New Error Code 451 May Help Figure It Out

When UK sites blocked access to the Pirate Bay following a court order the standard 403 code error for “Forbidden” appeared, but a new standard will let users know that a site is not accessible because of legal reasons. According to the Verge, Tim Bray proposed the idea more than three years ago. The number may ring a bell. It is a nod to Bradbury’s Farenhiet 451. There some “process bits” to go before the full approval, but developers can start to implement it now. As the Verge explains, the code is voluntary. Nonetheless

If implemented widely, Bray’s new code should help prevent the confusion around blocked sites, but it’s only optional and requires web developers to adopt it. “It is imaginable that certain legal authorities may wish to avoid transparency, and not only forbid access to certain resources, but also disclosure that the restriction exists,” explains Bray.

It might be interesting to track how often the code is used and the reactions to it.

Here is the text of how the code is supposed to work:

This status code indicates that the server is denying access to the
resource as a consequence of a legal demand.

The server in question might not be an origin server. This type of
legal demand typically most directly affects the operations of ISPs
and search engines.

Responses using this status code SHOULD include an explanation, in
the response body, of the details of the legal demand: the party
making it, the applicable legislation or regulation, and what classes
of person and resource it applies to. For example:

HTTP/1.1 451 Unavailable For Legal Reasons
Link: ; rel=”blocked-by”
Content-Type: text/html


Unavailable For Legal Reasons

Unavailable For Legal Reasons

This request may not be serviced in the Roman Province
of Judea due to the Lex Julia Majestatis, which disallows
access to resources hosted on servers deemed to be
operated by the People’s Front of Judea.


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