Better Bar Design Means Better Revenue and Health for Bartenders

With the resurgence of cocktail culture, one may not think about a bartender’s work area, but it turns out that area is not well-designed so much so that bartenders have health problems and they can make fewer drinks. So in the age of let’s design and fix that, a bartender has come up with an “ergonomic, behind-the-bar workstation—which he calls the ‘race track’.” The new design lets the bartender stay in one place, have everything within forearm reach, and gets rid of the well (across which a bartender must lean and thus hurt his or her knees). The creator is seeking a patent, and the expected cost right now is five figures (they are hand built). The Wired piece covers some history of the bar and how ice changed the way we drink and how today the craft cocktail trend means efficiency is at a premium. As Wired notes

A good bar with a smartly built bartender station, on the other hand, is a blue-ribbon-prize-winning cash cow. Your typical cocktail den, Simó says, will rake in between $6,000 and $8,000 in sales in a night. At a nightclub, you more than triple that. A single bartender can ring in $10,000 in sales, by himself. That’s all contingent on how fast he can sling drinks, and Lafranconi says the race track is optimized for that kind of speed. “We can increase the output by about 10 to 15 drinks per hour.”

Throw in the health issues–“Tending bar in 10-hour shifts, night after night, can lead to injuries like tennis elbow, tendonitis, and plantar fasciitis”–and the future bar will let you be closer to the bartender, get your drink faster, and keep him or her in good enough health to be there the next time you visit. Pretty cool.

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