Highly Recommended: Chamayou’s The Theory of The Drone

robocop1924_02Earlier this year, I read a compelling analysis of drone warfare, Gregoire Chamayou’s The Theory of The Drone. It is an unusual and challenging book, of interest to both policymakers and philosophers, engineers and attorneys. As I begin a review of it:

At what point do would-be reformers of the law and ethics of war slide into complicity with a morally untenable status quo? When is the moralization of force a prelude for the ration­alization of slaughter? Grégoire Chamayou’s penetrating recent book, A Theory of the Drone, raises these uncomfortable questions for lawyers and engineers both inside and out of the academy. Chamayou, a French philosopher, dissects legal academics’ arguments for targeted killing by unmanned vehicles. He also criticizes university research programs purporting to engineer ethics for the autonomous weapons systems they view as the inevitable future of war. Writing from a tradition of critical theory largely alien to both engineering and law, he raises concerns that each discipline should address before it continues to develop procedures for the automation of war.

As with the automation of law enforcement, advocacy, and finance, the automation of war has many unintended consequences. Chamayou helps us discern its proper limits.

Image Credit: 1924 idea for police automaton.

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