Law’s Nostradamus

The ABA Journal “Legal Rebels” page has promoted Richard Susskind’s work (predicting the future automation of much of what lawyers do) as “required reading.” It is a disruptive take on the legal profession. But disruption has been having a tough time as a theory lately. So I was unsurprised to find this review, by a former General Counsel of DuPont Canada Inc., of Susskind’s The End of Lawyers?:

Susskind perceives a lot of routine in the practice of law . . . which he predicts will gradually become the domain of non-professional or quasi-professional workers. In this respect his prediction is about two or three decades too late. No substantial law firm, full service or boutique, can survive without a staff of skilled paralegal specialists and the trend in this direction has been ongoing since IT was little more than a typewriter and a Gestetner duplicating machine. . . .

Law is not practiced in a vacuum. It is not merely a profession devoted to preparing standard forms or completing blanks in precedents. And though he pays lip service to the phenomenon, there is little appreciation of the huge volume of indecipherable legislation and regulation that is promulgated every day of every week of the year. His proposal to deal with this through regular PDA alerts is absurd. . . . In light of this, if anything in Susskind’s thesis can be given short shrift it is his prognostication that demand for “bespoke” or customized services will be in secular decline. Given modern trends in legislative and regulatory drafting, in particular the use of “creative ambiguity” as it’s been called, demand for custom services will only increase.

Nevertheless, I predict Susskind’s work on The Future of the Professions will get a similarly warm reception from “Legal Rebels.” The narrative of lawyers’ obsolescence is just too tempting for those who want to pay attorneys less, reduce their professional independence from the demands of capital, or simply replace legal regulation of certain activities with automated controls.

However, even quite futuristic academics are not on board with the Susskindite singularitarianism of robo-lawyering via software Solons. The more interesting conversations about automation and the professions will focus on bringing accountability to oft-opaque algorithmic processes. Let’s hope that the professions can maintain some autonomy from capital to continue those conversations–rather than guaranteeing their obsolescence as ever more obeisant cogs in profit-maximizing machines.

 

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