Who Wrote This?

Greetings and salutations.  Chasing a toddler around while writing a book has knocked me offline for a while, but I’ve got some posts coming up this week.  Some of them will relate to my Bill of Rights research, as I’ve been grinding my way through hundreds of newspaper articles and periodicals going back to the 18th century to look at how the term was used.

Here is one tantalizing item that I want to discuss.  In September, 1792, an anonymous article “By a Farmer” appeared in a magazine and criticized future Broadway musical star Alexander Hamilton and his policies at the Treasury.  The author opened the article this way:

“As long as the state of America continue under the present form of government, the PEOPLE will have to lament the want of a bill of rights, which would clearly and unequivocally dictate to the legislature its duty, and to the people their rights.”

Anyone see the problem here?  The Bill of Rights was ratified in December 1791.  Evidently Mr. Farmer did not get the memo that this was a bill of rights or that we should celebrate its enactment into law.  The piece then went on to discuss the French Declaration of the Rights of Men, and then commented that the French were a highly enlightened people who:

“Have prefixed a bill of rights to their form of government, not as being applicable to their own situation alone, but as constituting the foundation of every just government.  Had the constitution of the United States a foundation equally firm and equitable; we should not at this day witness the law of the union stained with . . .” [then the author lists several of Hamilton’s initiatives].

What I want to see is if I can determine who the author of this was.  At that time prominent public men often wrote under a pen name.  This one obviously came from a Jeffersonian, but which one?

UPDATE:  The answer is George Logan of Pennsylvania, who earns his 15 minutes of fame as the namesake of the Logan Act.

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1 Response

  1. Orin Kerr says:

    I wonder when Logan wrote that letter. It was published after the Bill of Rights were ratified, but it may have been written long before then.