Floyd Landis and A New Wrinkle on the Court of Public Opinion


Some of you may recall that Floyd Landis is fighting allegations by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency and World Anti-Doping Agency that Landis used testosterone to win the Tour de France. Today’s L.A. Times has an article about the fight and of possible note to this readership the way in which Landis is challenging the process. Landis has posted 370 pages of documents including the lab reports related to the dispute. According the Times, “The result is a vigorous debate on Internet message forums and bulletin boards about the science underlying the charge and whether Landis … has been unjustly accused.” Even more interesting “Landis’ representatives say they have gleaned a wealth of clues about how to attack the evidence when the case goes before an arbitration panel.”

The approach is being called the wiki defense.

Landis’s move seems to accomplish at least two things: 1) He is forcing an otherwise closed process into the open and 2) He is tapping into a large pool of knowledge including experts in the field to challenge the claims.

If this approach works, perhaps the court of public opinion will enter a new phase where defendants use technology to reach a larger audience to plead their case (and I suppose possibly taint juror pools though this instance is an arbitration) and where perhaps better science and analysis will come to bear on cases. My guess is that those who see this as a total revolution in how cases will operate will overstate its impact. Nonetheless, I wonder what would have happened in the O.J. or Kobe cases if there were a wiki where evidence was available to the public. If the material online were already in the public record and then posted online, it may simply be a further aspect of television broadcasts of trials. Yet, if one were a poor defendant or under-resourced public defender and could use the Web to access scientific and/or legal defense knowledge similar to what O.J. or Kobe could afford that could be quite an interesting development for the defense bar.

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1 Response

  1. Frank says:

    Yes, this is a fascinating development. I’ve hoped that scholars would start keeping articles as wiki’s…noting, say, ideas they’ve abandoned, or better citations for things that were only moderately well supported in the original article.

    But I suppose I should lead by example here rather than just wishing! Actually, Benkler’s Wealth of Networks wiki may be a good example.