Tagged: legal scholarship

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Journal of Legal Education — Interview with Judge Harry T. Edwards on Legal Scholarship

Judge Harry T. Edwards

Judge Harry T. Edwards

The latest issue of the Journal of Legal Education is out and contains, among other things, my question-and-answer interview with Judge Harry T. Edwards on the topic of legal scholarship. The interview is prefaced with a short biographical profile of the Judge and closes with a bibliography of all his published works.

Among other things, the interview contains the Judge’s responses to some of those who have commented on his writings on legal scholarship (17 articles), including Judge Richard Posner, Dean Erwin Chemerinsky, and Professors Michael Dorf,  Lee Petherbridge, Pierre Schlag, and David L. Schwartz.

Here are a few excerpts [brackets added]:

  • [The only African-American] When I entered the University of Michigan Law School in 1962, I was the only African American in my class. I graduated very high in my law school class, earning a number of honors for academic achievement. Nevertheless, when I finished law school, many major law firms to which I applied for jobs rejected me. I was told quite frankly by some of the hiring partners that, despite my strong academic record, the firms would not hire a Negro. It was only when my white mentor, Michigan law Professor Russell Smith, pressed on my behalf that I received a job offer from a major Chicago law firm.
  • [Best kind of legal writing] In my view, “legal writing” at its best is precise, carefully reasoned, and well-supported (by both facts and governing principles). It should not be meandering, pointless, frivolous, or pedantic.
  • [Addressing law’s purpose] There are still law professors who express disdain for the practice of law, and offer no concrete proposals for reform. In my view, this is unacceptable. In constructing a vision of legal education, I agree with Professor J.B. White, who once wrote that, in order for legal academic work “to be of value to the law it is essential that the work in question express interest in, and respect for, the possibilities of what lawyers . . . do.” This means that a good body of legal scholarship must address law’s purpose of serving society. Not all legal scholarship, but a good body of it.
  • [Abstract scholarship] There is certainly value in some abstract scholarship. I have never doubted this. But it should not be preferred over other forms of scholarship. In order for legal scholarship to be relevant outside the legal academy, law professors should balance abstract scholarship with scholarly works that are of interest and use to lawyers, legislators, judges, and regulators who serve society through legal arguments, decision-making, regulatory initiatives, and enforcement actions. In other words, law schools, law reviews, and legal scholars should do a better job in producing scholarship that is of interest and use to wider audiences in society.
  • [Theory-laden articles] Law review editors have come to understand the law schools’ preferences for obscure philosophical and theory-laden material, in part because they have received so many articles of this stripe in recent years. And the law reviews have accommodated these forms of scholarship, largely without protest.
  • [Blogs] The worry that I have with law blogs (as with many Internet sites that purport to report and comment on the news) is that they sometimes report and comment too quickly on judicial decisions. As a result, blogs do not always capture the important nuances of an opinion or the precedent that underlies the decision.
  • [Gulf between academy & the profession] Unless law schools ensure that their faculties reflect a real balance of talent—i.e., including professors with strengths in both concrete and abstract scholarship and teaching—the current gulf between the profession and the academy will continue to grow and become even more distressing.
  • [Hitting a nerve] The reactions from the bench, bar, and academy [concerning my article “The Growing Disjunction Between Legal Education and the Legal Profession“] were more than anything I ever anticipated. One of my former colleagues at the University of Michigan Law School, who will remain unnamed, sent me a funny and poignant letter which said something like: “Obviously, you hit a nerve. And what is so amusing is that the members of the academy cannot simply dismiss your critique because you are a member of the academy and know what goes on in our ranks.”
  •       → There is more, much more, to our interview, so go here for the entire exchange. ←  

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FAN 90 (First Amendment News) Law Professors Urge Justices to Honor Stare Decisis in Union 1-A case

Well, Senator, the importance of settled expectations in the application of stare decisis is a very important consideration. — John Roberts (Sept.13, 2005)

Andrew Pincus

Andrew Pincus

“A review of this Court’s decisions over the last 75 years—from 1940 through 2015— reveals that the Court has expressly overruled only ninety-one constitutional precedents, or slightly more than one case per Term. And when the Court does overrule a precedent, it typically—in 57 percent of the cases—acts unanimously or nearly-unanimously, with two or fewer Justices in dissent. In only twenty-one cases (23 percent) did a bare majority of the Court overrule a constitutional precedent.”

Thus did Andrew Pincus argue in an amicus brief he filed in Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, et al.The brief was submitted on behalf of  four constitutional scholars in support of the Respondents. The professors are:

  1. Walter E. Dellinger III, Douglas B. Maggs Professor Emeritus of Law, Duke Law School
  2. Michael H. Gottesman, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center
  3. William P. Marshall, William Rand Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Law, University of North Carolina School of Law, and
  4. David A. Strauss, Gerald Ratner Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School.
Professor David Strauss

Professor David Strauss

In urging the Court not to overrule the unanimous judgment in Abood v. Detroit Board of Education (1977), Mr. Pincus and the law professors offer five reasons to support the Court’s invocation of stare decisis: 

  1. First, “overruling Abood will significantly disrupt settled legal rules in related areas. . . .Because the legal principle underlying Pickering and Abood is essentially identical, overruling Abood would undermine the more relaxed First Amendment standards governing government regulation of employee speech applied in Pickering and its progeny. . . . Overruling Abood . . . would lead inevitably to significantly greater limitations on government regulation of employee speech in the workplace.”
  2. “Second, Abood is a forty year-old precedent decided unanimously and reaffirmed multiple times by a unanimous Court. It has been applied consistently in the government employee context and relied upon by the Court to resolve First Amendment questions in related contexts involving government restrictions on associational interests.”
  3. “Third, Abood has created significant reliance interests. Twenty-three States and the District of Columbia have enacted statutes in reliance on this Court’s decision—and not just those statutes, but these States’ entire collective bargaining regime, would have to be revised if Abood were overruled.”
  4. “Fourth, no changes in relevant facts or in society or in legal principles support overruling Abood. The decision’s basic premise—that the government’s vital interest in structuring its workforce permits gov- ernment as an employer to take actions that would be unconstitutional in other contexts—has been con- sistently reaffirmed by this Court in a variety of contexts,” and
  5. “Fifth, the Abood standard is workable, as the de cisions of this Court and the lower courts make clear.”

Additionally, they argue that

overruling Abood would likely trigger an avalanche of lawsuits against government employers and unions seeking agency fee refunds. That has already happened in the wake of this Court’s decision in Harris: plaintiffs have filed class actions in a number of states, including New York, Oregon, and Washington. One suit seeks the return of over $20 million in agency-shop fees paid by childcare workers.

Will such arguments stay the reversing hand of the same Roberts Court that set aside stare decisis in cases such as Citizens United v. FEC (2010), McDonald v. Chicago (2010), Gonzales v. Carhart (2007), and Parents Involved in Community Schools v. Seattle Sch. Dist. No. 1 (2007)? In all of those cases, among others, existing precedents were overruled by a bare majority of the Court.

→ Even if the Court should decline to formally overrule Abood, might it not do so functionally, by way of “stealth overruling“? After all, that tactic has been to such good use in the Miranda line of cases that even Chief Justice William Rehnquist (a longtime Miranda critic) declined to overrule the landmark Warren Court precedent when he had the chance to do so.

 The other Counsel for the Amici are: Eugene Fidell (Yale Law School Supreme Court Clinic), Charles Rothfeld, Michael Kimberly, and Paul Hughes (all of Mayer Brown).

→ See also FAN 28 (First Amendment News) — “The Demise of Stare Decisis?” (Aug. 20, 2014)

[ht: Tony Mauro]

Court Strikes Down Trademark Law on First Amendment Grounds Read More

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On legal education & legal scholarship — More questions for Judge Posner

We should not allow complacency about the American university system to blind us to the weaknesses in legal education.

I am not starry-eyed about the new interdisciplinary legal scholarship. [Even so,] where is it written that all legal scholarship shall be in the service of the legal profession? 

The decline in doctrinal scholarship is relative, not absolute, and perhaps not even relative; all that may be occurring is a shift in the production of doctrinal scholarship toward scholars at law schools of the second and third tier.

Richard Posner (1995)

This is the fifth installment in the “Posner on Posner” series of posts on Seventh Circuit Judge Richard Posner. The first installment can be found here, the second here, the third here, and the fourth one here.  

Richard Posner’s scholarly career in law may have started in 1961-62 when he served on the Harvard Law Review, first as a staff member and then as the President. During that period he published on topics as diverse as a note on the application of international law to outer space (74 HLR 1154), a comment on federal review of state law rulings (74 HLR 1375), a comment patent and antitrust law (75 HLR 602), and a comment on the application of law to religiously owned property (75 HLR). After his clerkship with Justice William Brennan (1962-63 Term) and several jobs with the federal government, he began his professorial career at Stanford Law School in 1969 and thereafter ventured off to the University of Chicago Law School where he is currently a senior lecturer in law. Over the years he has taught antitrust, economic analysis of law, civil procedure, conflict of laws, law and science, evidence, and law and literature.

Screen Shot 2014-12-02 at 2.03.58 PMOne of his articles ranked 64th in the list of the most-cited law review articles of all time. In the field of antitrust law, one his articles (co-authored with William Landes) ranked second in the listings of the most-cited law review articles. (Posner had his own system of rankings.  See here) Even more impressive, as reported by Fred R. Shapiro and Michelle Pears, “[a]s of 2000, Judge Posner was the most often-cited legal scholar of all time with 7,981 citations, nearly 50 percent more than anyone else.”

In the last half-century or so, Posner has published a wide variety of scholarly works in the form of books (40-plus) and articles (300-plus) – perhaps more than any academic writing in the field of American law. In that array of legal literature he has written much on the topic of legal education and legal scholarship. See, for example, the following nine articles by him:

  1. The Present Situation in Legal Scholarship,” 90 Yale Law Journal 1113 (1981)
  2. The Decline of Law as an Autonomous Discipline,” 100 Harvard Law Review 761 (1987)
  3. The Deprofessionalization of Legal Teaching and Scholarship,” 91 Michigan Law Review 1921 (1993)
  4. The Future of the Student-Edited Law Review,” 47 Stanford Law Review 1131 (1994)
  5. William M. Landes & Richard A. Posner, “Heavily Cited Articles in Law,” 71 Chi.-Kent L. Rev. 825 (1996)
  6. Past-Dependency, Pragmatism, and Critique of History in Adjudication and Legal Scholarship,” 67 University of Chicago Law Review 573 (2000)
  7. Legal Scholarship Today,” 115 Harvard Law Review 1314 (2002)
  8. Against Law Reviews,” Legal Affairs, Nov-Dec. 2004
  9. The State of Legal Scholarship Today: A Comment on Schlag,” 97 Georgetown Law Journal 845 (2009)

Below are some questions on the topics of legal education and legal scholarship I posed to the Judge followed by his replies. (Note: Some links will open in Firefox or Chrome but not in Safari.)

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Question: What do you think is the single greatest shortcoming of legal education in America today?

Posner: There are several shortcomings; I don’t know how to rank them.

  1. Legal education is too expensive, in part because law school faculties are too large.
  2. Not enough law professors, especially at the elite law schools, have substantial practical experience as lawyers, and
  3. Law school teaching focuses excessively on legal doctrine, to the exclusion of adequate attention to facts, business practices, science and technology, psychology, judicial mentality and behavior, legal practice, and application of legal principles.

Question: Insofar as the teaching of legal ethics is concerned, is teaching the rules of professional responsibility and the cases interpreting them enough in your opinion? Or should some significant attention be devoted to familiarizing law students with some of the great works of the Western Philosophical tradition? – say, to Plato’s Gorgias or Aristotle’s Rhetoric (see here at p. 1924)

Posner:  I don’t consider instruction in legal ethics an important part of legal education. Aristotle’s Rhetoric is pertinent to the rhetorical dimension of legal practice, rather than to legal ethics. Gorgias can be read as critical of lawyers’ tricks, though there were no lawyers as such in fourth century b.c. Athens.

Question:  It has been argued that legal education is akin to learning a form of science. In what ways, if any, does it make sense to speak of the study of law as the study of legal science?

Posner: Law has nothing to do with science. It involves making and applying rules of conduct; the rules are based on legislative and other political decisions, common sense, societal values, judges’ personal preferences, intuition, rhetoric—not logical or scientific rigor.

Question: All things considered, what do you think of calls for reducing law school education to two years?

Posner:  I think that would be fine. A third year might be offered, but as something to be taken after the two-year graduate has spent some time in practice and wants some specialized further training.

Question: In your opinion, how, if at all, has the role of the law school dean changed in the past half-century? And if it has changed, what do you make of it?

Posner: Much more emphasis on fund raising.

Question: In Tagatz v. Marquette University (1988) you noted that tenure “tends to take some of the edge off academic ambition.” What are your views on the current tenure system as it operates in law schools and how, if at all, might you change it?

Posner: Tenure is a form of nonmonetary compensation, hence attractive to universities. The downside is it undermines the work ethic. I don’t know whether the benefits exceed the costs.

Question: (1) What are your views concerning affirmative action and tenure standards when it comes to promoting racial minorities? And do democratic principles justify bending evaluative standards?

(2) Is the problem of race the problem of the evaluative standards that law schools employ? If so, what is the alternative?

Screen Shot 2014-12-07 at 11.45.07 PMPosner:  (1) The only racial minority in the United States that needs affirmative action is the African-American minority. I doubt, though, that African-Americans who have the competence to be considered as law professors need a boost.

(2) I think law schools should give more weight to practical experience in hiring law professors, but I don’t think this relates particularly to African-Americans.

Question: Many years ago you wrote: “not all blacks are culturally black.” Would you a say a bit more about what you meant by that and do you still hold to that view? In answering that question, do you think that one can ever fully escape the consequences of his or her color even if one is, as you put it, an “assimilated black”?

Posner: I’m sure that almost all African-Americans are conscious of and think occasionally about being black—that’s inevitable given history, and it’s the same reason that secular Jews, who may have zero interest in Judaism or Jewish culture, remain conscious of being Jewish. But successful upper-middle-class African-Americans are so much like their white counterparts as not to be preoccupied with the racial difference.

Question: Is Socratic “cold call” method dying in law schools? Or is it already largely dead? If so, is this a good thing? Your views? Read More

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The Varying Use of Legal Scholarship by the U.S. Supreme Court across Issues

While patent law is my core area of scholarly interest, I have also studied the use of legal scholarship by the courts. My co-author Lee Petherbridge from Loyola-LA and I have conducted several comprehensive empirical studies using large datasets on the issue. More precisely, we have analyzed how often federal courts cite to law review articles in their decisions. We have empirically analyzed the issue from a variety of angles. We have studied the use of legal scholarship by the U.S. Supreme Court (available here), by the regional U.S. Courts of Appeals (study available here), and by the Federal Circuit (available here). I won’t recount the finding of those studies here. Instead, I will report some new information and ask readers for potential explanations of the data.

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Should Empirical Legal Scholars Have Special Responsibilities?

Before delving into the substance of my first post, I wanted to thank the crew at Concurring Opinions for inviting me to guest blog this month.

Recently, I have been thinking about whether empirical legal scholars have or should have special ethical responsibilities. Why special responsibilities? Two basic reasons. First, nearly all law reviews lack formal peer review. The lack of peer review potentially permits dubious data to be reported without differentiation alongside quality data. Second, empirical legal scholarship has the potential to be extremely influential on policy debates because it provides “data” to substantiate or refute claims. Unfortunately, many consumers of empirical legal scholarship — including other legal scholars, practitioners, judges, the media, and policy makers — are not sophisticated in empirical methods. Even more importantly, subsequent citations of empirical findings by legal scholars rarely take care to explain the study’s qualifications and limitations. Instead, subsequent citations often amplify the “findings” of the empirical study by over-generalizing the results. 

My present concern is about weak data. By weak data, I don’t mean data that is flat out incorrect (such as from widespread coding errors) or that misuses empirical methods (such as when the model’s assumptions are not met). Others previously have discussed issues relating to incorrect data and analysis in empirical legal studies. Rather, I am referring to reporting data that encourages weak or flawed inferences, that is not statistically significant, or that is of extremely limited value and thus may be misused. The precise question I have been considering is under what circumstances one should report weak data, even with an appropriate explanation of the methodology used and its potential limitations. (A different yet related question for another discussion is whether one should report lots of data without informing the reader which data the researcher views as most relevant. This scattershot approach has many of the same concerns as weak data.)

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