Category: Roundups

0

Roundup: Law and Humanities 06.28.16

 

Conferences

 

Call For Papers: 2016 Law & Society Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference

Disruption, Temporality, Law:
The Future of Law and Society Scholarship

2016 Conference of the Law & Society Association of Australia and New Zealand

30th November – 3rd December 2016

Call for Papers closes: 30th June 2016

The Call for Papers for the 2016 Law & Society Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference, hosted by the Law Futures Centre and Griffith Law School in conjunction with the Southern Cross University School of Law and Justice closes on the 30th June 2016. Details of the call for papers are attached.

We are also pleased to announce the following confirmed keynote speakers:

  • Professor William MacNeil, The Hon John Dowd Chair in Law, Dean and Head, School of Law and Social Justice, Southern Cross University
  • Professor Irene Watson, Research Professor of Law, School of Law, University of South Australia
  • More keynote announcements to come!

The conference will open on the evening of Wednesday 30th November with a public debate on “The Future of Legal Education”. Confirmed debate participants include:

  • Professor Margaret Thornton, ANU College of Law, Australian National University
  • Bill Potts, President, Queensland Law Society & Founding Director, Potts Lawyers
  • John Briton, Former Legal Services Commissioner, Queensland
  • Professor Reid Mortensen, Head of School, School of Law and Justice, University of Southern Queensland
  • Magistrate Jacqui Payne, Queensland Courts
  • Professor Charles Sampford, Director of the Institute for Ethics, Governance and Law, Griffith University

Submission of Proposals:

Please submit proposals for papers, panels or streams to LSAANZ2016@griffith.edu.au. Proposals should consist of a short abstract (max. 250 words), 3 keywords and a short biography (100 words). Panel proposals should include a title/theme for the panel, and abstracts, keywords and biographies for each presenter.

We looking forward to welcoming you to Brisbane.

The 2016 Conference Organising Committee.

Professor John Flood, Dr Timothy Peters, Dr Edwin Bikundo, Mr Shahram Dana, Dr Roshan de Silva Wijeyeratne, Associate Professor Susan Harris-Rimmer, Ms Heron Loban, Dr Jennifer Nielsen, Professor Charles Sampford and Ms Kandice Cherrie.

For Conference enquiries email: LSAANZ2016@griffith.edu.au

 

Read More

0

Roundup: Law and Humanities 06.20.16

So much going on in law and humanities these days that it’s hard to pick and choose what to bring you. Here’s a sampling.

Conferences

There will be a Conference on Law and Ritual September 22-23, 2016 Leeuwarden, The Netherlands, sponsored by Voices of Law.

Here is a link to the conference website.

Follow news of the conference on Twitter:  #LawAndRitual @VoicesofLaw

_____

The organizers of the LSU Conference on Law, Authorship, and Appropriation are still accepting paper proposals for the Conference, which will take place at LSU A&M, Baton Rouge, on October 28 and 29, 2016. The original call (with updated dates) is reproduced below.

Call for Papers

By Any Other’s Name: A Conference on Law, Authorship, and Appropriation

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, October 28-29, 2016

On October 28-29, 2016, the LSU College of Music and Dramatic Arts, LSU School of Theatre, the LSU Law Center, LSU’s ORED (Office of Research and Economic Development) and the Law and Humanities Institute will co-sponsor a conference on law, authorship, and appropriation on the LSU A and M campus in Baton Rouge, LA. This conference will bring together scholars, performers, and students to discuss law and authorship in the face of challenges issued by artists who engage in appropriation—the practice of taking the works of others to rethink or recreate new works.

Some artists who engage in appropriation may describe their activities as parody, sampling, or remixing. Some artists whose work is appropriated may describe the result as misappropriation. Writers might describe the use or reuse of words variously as hommage or plagiarism. Lawyers weigh in both sides of the issue, interpreting such reuse as fair use or infringement, depending on the circumstances.

Digital technology creates a host of new considerations, from the opportunity for a creator to license rights up-front (or not at all) to opportunities for users to create content cooperatively, either on the Web or in face-to-face settings.

What do such changes, in law and in aesthetics and art, mean for our understandings of authorship and the relationship between creator and audience? Do words like “author” and “creator” even continue to have meaning?

Read More

0

Roundup: Law and Humanities 05.18.16

What’s new in the world of law and humanities:

Conferences

Call for Papers

By Any Other’s Name: A Conference on Law, Authorship, and Appropriation

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, October 28-29, 2016

On October 28-29, 2016, the LSU College of Music and Dramatic Arts, LSU School of Theatre, the LSU Law Center, LSU’s ORED (Office of Research and Economic Development) and the Law and Humanities Institute will co-sponsor a conference on law, authorship, and appropriation on the LSU A and M campus in Baton Rouge, LA. This conference will bring together scholars, performers, and students to discuss law and authorship in the face of challenges issued by artists who engage in appropriation—the practice of taking the works of others to rethink or recreate new works.

Some artists who engage in appropriation may describe their activities as parody, sampling, or remixing. Some artists whose work is appropriated may describe the result as misappropriation. Writers might describe the use or reuse of words variously as hommage or plagiarism. Lawyers weigh in both sides of the issue, interpreting such reuse as fair use or infringement, depending on the circumstances.

Digital technology creates a host of new considerations, from the opportunity for a creator to license rights up-front (or not at all) to opportunities for users to create content cooperatively, either on the Web or in face-to-face settings.

What do such changes, in law and in aesthetics and art, mean for our understandings of authorship and the relationship between creator and audience? Do words like “author” and “creator” even continue to have meaning?

Read More

0

Roundup: Law and Humanities 02.05.16

An update on the Law and Humanities Scene, February 2016.

CONFERENCES

1.The Law and Society Association meets in New Orleans from June 2 to June 5, 2016. The theme of the conference is At the Delta: Belonging, Place and Visions of Law and Social Change. Registration opens in early February, 2016. More information is available at the conference website here.

2.The Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities 19th Annual Conference takes place at the University of Connecticut Law School April 1-2, 2016. This year’s conference theme is Reading Race, Writing Race, and Living Race. More information is available at the conference website here.

3.The Kent Summer School in Critical Theory will run for the second time this year, in Paris, 13-24 June 2016. The website has just gone live.

This summer school for early career researchers and doctoral students aims to create a unique pedagogical experience, enabling leading critical thinkers to conduct an intensive 2-week seminar with members of a new generation of critical scholars.

Applications are now open to attend the summer school, and you will find application instructions on the website.

The teachers of the intensive seminars in 2016 will be Professor Samantha Frost, Professor James Martel, and Professor Bernard Stiegler. The website also contains information about the seminars, in addition to the school’s other events.

 

Read More

0

Hot Topics 2015 to 2016: A New Year Note

What an eventful 2015! Thanks to you, my friends and colleagues in media, business, investing, and academia, for engaging conversations, publications, and gatherings on a range of topics. These include Berkshire Hathaway, shareholder activism, the AIG case, celebrity contract disputes, and many more.  During 2016, I’ll continue to offer insights, interviews, and commentary and lecture widely on the vital business stories of the day. As we move into the New Year, herewith a forecast of hot topics in 2016 I’ve been following, gratefully along with many of you, in 2015:

  1. Shareholder Activistm 2.0 . A subject of ascending importance, I’m especially interested in the activist personalities and target cultures, and in 2015 commented for a profile of Carl Icahn in the  San Jose Mercury News (by Michelle Quinn) and of Nelson Peltz in the Wilmington News Journal (Maureen Milford & Jeff Wordock) as well as the case of DuPont Company on WDEL Radio (Frank Geravce). Expect to see more of the younger generation of activists—even younger than Bill Ackman and with fewer resources—as this approach to governance cements as mainstream. I am directly involved in a few of these efforts, including as a director nominee.
  1. Google and Gloms. As a cross-current against activism, I foresee continued restoration of the conglomerate business model. In 2015, I endorsed Google’s move in that direction, as noted in stories in The Omaha World-Herald (Steve Jordan), Quartz (Max Nisen), and MarketWatch (Tim Mullaney). I expect to see more conglomerates, even as many shareholder activists oppose them, and predict that the clash will be resolved by switching from a general aversion to gloms to the specific question of the model’s suitability for particular personalities, ownership structures, and corporate cultures.
  1. Berkshire Culture. I continue to believe that Berkshire corporate culture is special and full of lessons. In 2015, I was grateful to many editorial page editors for printing my op-eds on this theme. These addressed corporate culture and leadership in The Wall Street Journal (thanks Mark Lasswell & Paul Gigot); what’s so instructive about Berkshire in The Omaha World-Herald (thanks Deb Shanahan & Steve Jordan); and numerous aspects of Berkshire and Buffett in the Dealbook of The New York Times (thanks Jeff Cane & Peter Henning, Wayne State U.). More to come in 2016 as the company continues to both evolve and stay the same, as thoughtfully put in various stories in which I’m quoted, including in Fortune (Roger Lowenstein) and Reuters (Luciana Lopez).

Read More

0

Roundup: Law and Humanities 10.20.15

A quick view of the Law and Humanities landscape, mid-October 2015.

Conferences

First, we are looking forward to a couple of notable conferences next year. The Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities (ASLCH) 19th Annual Conference will take place at the University of Connecticut Law School April 1-2, 2016. This year’s conference theme is Reading Race, Writing Race, and Living Race. The deadline for submitting paper and panel proposals is extended until October 22nd. More information here at the conference website.

Another notable conference is the Law and Society Association Conference. This year LSA will hold its meeting in New Orleans from June 2-5, 2016. This year’s theme is At the Delta: Belonging, Place and Visions of Law and Social Change. The submission deadline for papers and panels has been extended to October 25. More information here at the LSA website.

In addition, AALS will have several interesting law and humanities-themed sessions.  The AALS Law and Film Committee presents as its feature film selection this year, Wednesday, January 6 at 7:30 p.m., Reversal of Fortune. This movie, based on the nonfiction account of the case by Alan Dershowitz of Harvard Law School, who represented Claus von Bulow, convicted of attempted murder of his wife Sunny, in his attempt to obtain a new trial. The film stars Jeremy Irons as von Bulow and Ron Silver as Dershowitz. On Friday, January 8, also at 7:30, the Committee presents the documentary film The Hunting Ground. This 2015 film, made by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering, investigates the explosion of campus rape and the repeated failure of many university officials to address the problem.

The Law and Humanities Section presents its panel at 10:30, January 9. This year’s presentation is on Law and Images. The Law and Interpretation Section presents its panel on January 9 at 4:30. Its theme is the Empirics of Legal Interpretation.  The Legal History Section presents its panel at 1:30 January 9. Its theme is 800 Years of Comparative Constitutionalism: The Unique Legacy of Magna Carta.

 

Read More

0

Roundup: Law and Humanities 07.30.15

There’s a lot going on in law and the humanities these days. Here’s a sampling.

First, an opportunity for publication:

Fairleigh Dickinson University Press invites the submission of proposals for books, monographs, or essay collections in the interdisciplinary fields of humanistically-oriented legal scholarship for the series The Fairleigh Dickinson University Press Series in Law, Culture and the Humanities.

Possible topics range from scholarship on legal history; legal theory and jurisprudence; law and critical/cultural studies, law and anthropology, law and literature, law and film, law and society, law and the performing arts, law and communication, law and philosophy, and legal hermeneutics.

Proposals must include: a description of the issue/s you intend to explore and the method/s you will use; a comparison and contrast with existing books on similar or related topics; a table of contents and a precis of what each chapter aims to cover; a description of the book’s target market/s; the author’s/authors’ or editor’s/editors’ curriculum vitae; if it is a collection of essays, a compiled and alphabetized list of short biographies of prospective contributors, and a list of three experts in the field capable of assessing the value of the project.

The series also welcomes submissions of completed monographs and essay collections; kindly make an inquiry prior to sending over the completed book or collection of essays, together with the author’s curriculum vitae and three suggested experts, if you are the author/authors. If you are an editor/editors of a completed collection of essays, please include a compiled and alphabetized list of short biographies of prospective contributors, together with your curriculum vitae and list of possible experts. Essay collections must be of previously unpublished material. Conference sessions, properly edited and often expanded by calls for papers, into essay collections, are also welcome.

Referees may or may not be from the submitted list of suggested experts. The series benefits from the advice of an international board of leading scholars in the field. Proposals may be sent to:

Caroline Joan S. Picart, Ph.D., J.D., Esquire
Tim Bower Rodriguez, P.A.
601 N. Ashley Drive, Suite 310,

Tampa, FL 33602

Email: cjpicart@gmail.com

Read More

0

ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 05.20.15

LAW AND POPULAR CULTURE IN LEGAL EDUCATION

The Spring 2015 issue of the New Mexico Law Review is devoted to the TV show Breaking Bad. Here’s a link to the issue’s intriguing contents, which includes such articles as Max Minzer’s Breaking Bad in the Classroom, Elizabeth N. Jones’ The Good and (Breaking) Bad of Deceptive Police Practices, and Jennifer W. Reynolds’ Breaking BATNAS: Negotiation Lessons From Walter White. The Wall Street Journal took note here; law and pop culture seems to have gone decidedly media mainstream.

 

LAW AND LITERATURE IN THE COURTROOM

On May 11, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg presided over the competency trial of Don Quixote at Washington, D.C.’s Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall. Assisting her were her colleague Justice Stephen Breyer and Chief Judge Merrick Garland and Judge Patricia Millett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and Judge Amy Berman Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.  Tony Mauro of the Blog of Legal Times provides coverage here.

The Quixote case is the latest in a series of law and humanities-inspired moot courts, beginning in 1994, that the Bard Association of the Shakespeare Theatre Company has hosted.  More here.

 

 

 

 

Read More

0

ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 04.16.15

New Books

New books of interest to law and humanities folks include Robert P. Burns’  Kafka’s Law: “The Trial” and American Criminal Justice (University of Chicago Press, 2014).  Here’s a description from the publisher’s website.

The Trial is actually closer to reality than fantasy as far as the client’s perception of the system. It’s supposed to be a fantastic allegory, but it’s reality. It’s very important that lawyers read it and understand this.” Justice Anthony Kennedy famously offered this assessment of the Kafkaesque character of the American criminal justice system in 1993. While Kafka’s vision of the “Law” in The Trial appears at first glance to be the antithesis of modern American legal practice, might the characteristics of this strange and arbitrary system allow us to identify features of our own system that show signs of becoming similarly nightmarish?
If you’d like to keep up on new books in the legal area, check out the New Books in Law twitter feed: https://twitter.com/NewBooksLaw.

Read More

0

ROUNDUP Law and Humanities 03. 03. 2015

Douglas Coulson, Assistant Professor of English at Carnegie-Mellon, is publishing a new blog in the area of law and the humanities: Nostrum remedium. Its tagline is “Miscellany on law, narrative, art, and memory.” Professor Coulson is particularly interested in legal rhetoric; his website provides links to a nice bibliography here and weblinks here.

A couple of interesting conferences are coming up this year. First:

An International Conference on Legal Argumentation and the Rule of Law is set for June 25 and 26, 2015 at the Erasmus School of Law, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Keynote speakers are Jacco Bomhoff, London School of Economics, Damiano Canale and Giovanni Tuzet, University of Bocconi, Milan, and Matthias Klatt, University of Hamburg.  More information at the website here.

 

Read More