Category: Just for Fun

Green Bag Article 02
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The Ultimate Unifying Approach to Complying with All Laws and Regulations

Professor Woodrow Hartzog and I have just published our new article, The Ultimate Unifying Approach to Complying with All Laws and Regulations19 Green Bag 2d 223 (2016)  Our article took years of research and analysis, intensive writing, countless drafts, and endless laboring over every word. But we hope we achieved a monumental breakthrough in the law.  Here’s the abstract:

There are countless laws and regulations that must be complied with, and the task of figuring out what to do to satisfy all of them seems nearly impossible. In this article, Professors Daniel Solove and Woodrow Hartzog develop a unified approach to doing so. This approach (patent pending) was developed over the course of several decades of extensive analysis of every relevant law and regulation.

 

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AALS diversion – Jackson Pollock

The annual AALS meeting is in New York in 2016. A few folks have asked whether I will be there. I am not able to attend, but in the spirit of it’s good to get out and see more than the law (or take a friend and go for a good long chat about legal scholarship), I see that that MOMA is pulling out its Jackson Pollock collection. The write up in the New Yorker is short and captures his evolution and why you should go.

Pollock was always Pollock, though he was long in agonizing doubt, notably about his ability to draw. Dripping brought a rush of relief, as he found a steadying and dispassionate, heaven-sent collaborator: gravity. Drawing in the air above the canvas freed him from, among other things, himself. “Number 31” is the feat of a fantastic talent no longer striving for expression but set to work and monitored. He watched what it did. We join him in watching. Pollock redefined painting to make it accept the gifts that he had been desperate to give. Any time is the right one to be reminded of that.

Sorry to miss AALS and the exhibit, but there will be other chances to enjoy both.

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A Christmas Movie that Led to a Financial Reg (Sort of)

Trading Places is a Christmas movie in that it is set during the holidays and I suppose making hundreds of millions (or probably billions in today’s dollars) is a 1980s Christmas wish as compared to other Christmas wish movies. It is a heart-warming story of a young Eddie Murphy and Dan Akroyd taking on the entrenched elite by, oh well, by insider trading. The ending and the glory of frozen concentrated orange juice live on. First the full explanation of how the two manage to out maneuver the Dukes is a little tricky. But after the thirtieth anniversary a two years ago, a few places explain it nicely. NPR’s coverage is succinct. Business Insider is good and has better pictures. But the best is from Don’t Worry I am an Economist which has a step-by-step on short selling, and then applies it to the movie including explaining how the pricing worked (142 is in fact A $1.42 and 29 is $0.29 per pound but the contracts are for thousands of pounds thus “Trading begins at 102 cents per pound (at 15,000 pounds of F.C.O.J. per contract – size of a typical contract – the value of a single contract is $15,300).”.). So he shows that

How much have they made? Let’s see. In the movie Winthorpe says they’ve moved around 20,000 contracts. Assuming they’ve sold short at a constant pace from 142 down to 102, and that later they’ve bought them back while the price was falling from 46 down to 29, let’s say that the average sell price was around 122 cents per pound, where the average buy-back price was 37.5 cents per pound. The spread is therefore 122 – 37.5 = 84.5 cents per pound profit. Per single contract this is 15,000 pounds * 84.5 cents per pound = $12,675 per contract. Multiply this by roughly 20,000 contracts and their total profit was: $253,500,000.

Oh and here is the law and regulation part: The movie was explicitly invoked as the Eddie Murphy rule when the government finally made insider trading on the commodities market illegal. Per the WSJ when the rule passed CFTC Chief Gary Gensler explained:

We have recommended banning using misappropriated government information to trade in the commodity markets. In the movie “Trading Places,” starring Eddie Murphy, the Duke brothers intended to profit from trades in frozen concentrated orange juice futures contracts using an illicitly obtained and not yet public Department of Agriculture orange crop report. Characters played by Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd intercept the misappropriated report and trade on it to profit and ruin the Duke brothers. In real life, using such misappropriated government information actually is not illegal under our statute. To protect our markets, we have recommended what we call the “Eddie Murphy” rule to ban insider trading using nonpublic information misappropriated from a government source.

Law and lit and reg I guess. Anyway Merry Christmas and in the words of Nenge Mboko “Merry New Year.”

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Cyberpunk Because You Forgot to Get Someone a Gift

OK Cyberpunk can be great for a range of reasons, but I saw this repost from i09 on The Essential Cyberpunk reading list and thought, “A great list with some books I have not read. Wait! It’s a list for folks who need to send a just in time Christmas gift (assuming they are available as eBooks, which I know some are). I easily recommend Neuromancer, Snow Crash, and Mirrorshades. I look forward to reading the rest (Accelerando did not work for me but I may try it again). Plus this genre really does a great job of positing worlds and issues that are pressing the tech-law space right now, so that is another reason to jump in.

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Books, because it’s the holidays part 2

Another book I read this year that may appeal to some is All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age. It is by Hubert Dreyfus and Sean Dorrance Kelly. I encountered the ideas when I listened to Professor Dreyfus’s lectures (Phil 6 under the Berkeley course catalog) on the subject on iTunes U. I liked the earlier lectures but the later ones that build on the ideas and the book with Kelly are good too.

For those who recall BSG, the ideas of the course connect to the tensions between the Cylons and humanity. Moby Dick and Heidegger are trying to show a way to a time of what Dreyfus calls moods in the Greek sense. See that? Greeks. Like BSG but Dreyfus and Kelly are also offering a way to deal with the despair that David Foster Wallace felt and about which he wrote. There is much more to unpack in this work, and a blog post is not the place. I will let their Note to the Reader entice, repel, or bore you as you see fit:

THE WORLD DOESN’T MATTER to us the way it used to. The intense and meaningful lives of Homer’s Greeks, and the grand hierarchy of meaning that structured Dante’s medieval Christian world, both stand in stark contrast to our secular age. The world used to be, in its various forms, a world of sacred, shining things. The shining things now seem far away. This book is intended to bring them close once more. The issues motivating our story are philosophical and literary, and we come at them from our professional background in these disciplines. But All Things Shining is intended for a nonspecialist audience, and we hope it will speak to a wide range of people. Anyone who lives in the contemporary world has the background to read it, and anyone who hopes to enrich his or her life by experiencing it in the light of classic philosophical and literary works can hope to find something here. Anyone who wants to lure back the shining things, to uncover the wonder we were once capable of experiencing and to reveal a world that sometimes calls forth such a mood; anyone who is done with indecision and waiting, with expressionlessness and lostness and sadness and angst, and who is ready for whatever it is that comes next; anyone with hope instead of despair, or anyone with despair that they would like to leave behind, can find something worthwhile in the pages ahead. Or at least that is what we intend. Dreyfus, Hubert; Kelly, Sean Dorrance (2011-01-04). All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in a Secular Age . Free Press. Kindle Edition.

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Books, because it’s the holidays

Books! As Dan Solove reminded me when I first started as a professor, “Read! FIND TIME TO READ!” Although this post is about fiction, and Dan was talking about research; Dan was correct in general. As I have written here before and told students, remember to read good writing. For lawyers, I suggest lean, tight writing. I have a love for Proust, Joyce, and Faulkner, but that style is not a good fit for law. Today I suggest Karen Blixen aka Isak Denison. The prose in Out of Africa is beautiful. Does the book reveal colonial biases and perhaps prejudices? Sure. is the writing clean and does she still identify parts of the human experience that go beyond race? I think so. You all can judge for yourself. For now I leave you with a passage that perhaps reaches me because of the western drought that may, with luck, relent:

But one year the long rains failed. It was, then, as if the Universe were turning away from you. It grew cooler, on some days it would be cold, but there was no sign of moisture in the atmosphere. Everything became drier and harder, and it was as if all force and gracefulness had withdrawn from the world. It was not bad weather or good weather, but a negation of all weather, as if it had been deferred sine die. A bleak wind, like a draught, ran over your head, all colour faded from all things; the smells went away from the fields and forests. This feeling of being in disgrace with the Great Powers pressed on you. To the South, the burnt plains lay black and waste, striped with grey and white ashes. Dinesen, Isak (2011-05-18). Out of Africa: and Shadows on the Grass (Vintage International) (p. 41). Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.

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3D Printing Helps Yale Student Create Beer Bottle Pipe Organ?

Apparently, a Yale student has used 3D printing to create a beer bottle keyboard. Blowing across the top of a bottle to create sounds it not new. This student created a keyboard “of 12 beer bottles, which are set up in 2 rows, one consisting of 7 bottles and the other 5.” But when tried the get compressed air to make the same sound as a human mouth, the outcome failed. He needed a way to mimic a mouth. He “took several pictures of himself blowing air into the bottles. He then used SolidWorks to model the opening for each ‘mouthpiece’. Once modeled he used an Stratasys Objet 30Pro 3D printer to print out 12 of these nozzle attachments. The problem was solved!” Cool idea, difficult problem, yet now able to solve on your own: this 3D moment is fun example of the way the technology is opening up more creation and shifting the ability not only to design a solution but make one at a local or individual level.

I wonder how many cool new things will emerge in six to twelve months from now after all 3D printers for the holidays gifts are opened and played with. We’ll see. Whether these inventors will also file more patents on things like this students mouthpiece will also be interesting. For now, I’m happy to see fun, odd stuff being created.

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CIV!!! Or How Simulations May Help Government and Personal Choices

Could Civilization and the SIMs be part of a better informed future? I loved Civilization and played way too many hours of it in college. Turns out that the Colombian government has developed “computer games which are designed to teach pre-teenagers to make sensible choices about everything from nutrition to gang membership.” I wonder whether running a simulation of choices and outcomes over and over would shape behaviors or teach other gaming instincts. For example, most people might find that if they follow certain paths they end up in safe, but relatively happy middle class life and retirement. Heck, the game, Life, was a truly random version of what growing up is (then again maybe everything is so stochastic that Life is correct to rely on the spin of a wheel to see whether one is a doctor or teacher or has kids). Still, a game that reinforced the experience of putting money away now, not having it to play with, but having savings in retirement, i.e., the tradeoffs were more palpable, might sensitize people to choices. I never played SIMs, only Sim City, but if SIMs lets you smoke, take drugs, drink too much, have unsafe sex, etc. and gain near term rewards but then find that the long-term payoffs were poor, that would be interesting. Of course, some outcomes might be you’re a superstar who dies early or worse ends up on a horrid reality show. And, many may say “I was a wild child, had a blast, and ended up on T.V.? Cool!”

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Another in the Stop, Be A Better Lawyer Posts

With all the focus on law in alleged decline, and the ease with which we can put our heads deep into a subject, too much can pass by. That is why on occasion I post about meteor showers, eclipses, and other wondrous fun. Fun can die. Wonder can fade. When I taught professional responsibility, I always tried to remind students that the profession can be tough (just look at substance abuse and divorce rates for lawyers), but that they should try to find part of the law that excited them. One had to know that even then the fight is long and difficult, but if you love the work, much of the burden is reduced. If you are lucky, you may be able to have the joy that these science folks share in the video below. And if the career is not giving you a way to find the wonder, find it elsewhere. That too can lift you up, and you will be a better lawyer. Yes, empathy matters, and I think it grows when we remember that are humans running through life trying to make things work and maybe a bit better too.

So I give you this video. I hope deGrasse Tyson is correct that we are all connected by logic. But even if he is incorrect, as Guru Sagan says, “The beauty of a living thing is not the atoms that go into it, but the way those atoms are put together.” Enjoy.

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The Future, Heaven, and Limbo Have Been and Will Always Be Apple Stores

If you saw Sleeper, Heaven Can Wait, or the last of the Harry Potter films, you might notice that they all have scenes that look quite like an Apple Store. White, seemingly floating desks, some robots, a sense of what it is all about. The likely reason is the design gurus of the 1970s like the stark white, sharp lines look. Steve Jobs was a student of that era and it informed Apple, The Sequel from iPods to the stores (the first Apple movie was design tools, the second was “we design, you buy”). As for Harry Potter, why fight the future and the masters? Tap into that vibe and viewers will be happy to know that even limbo, afterlife (whatever that was) is much as it has always been. White, simple, soothing, yet confusing too.

I wonder whether the Chinese group that copied the Apple Store perfectly could argue that the trade dress was generic?