Category: General Law

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Good Thing This is a Slow Week

I will be leaving for a family vacation tomorrow, and thus I doubt that I will have any instant reaction to the cases that are handed down tomorrow and Friday.  I’m not clear whether Friday will be the last day in any event.

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FAN 65 (First Amendment News) Does Justice Thomas believe in a race-hate exception to the First Amendment?

The Ku Klx Klan marched frequently in Savannah [where Clarence Thomas grew up], and Klan members dominated the police ranks of the 1930s, ’40s, and ’50s . . . Ken Foskett, Judging Thomas: The Life & Times of Clarence Thomas (2004)

As a child in the Deep South, I’d grown up fearing the lynch mobs of the Ku Klux Klan . . . . Clarence ThomasMy Grandfather’s Son: A Memoir (2007)

One has to wonder whether his vote was not at least in some measure affected by the particular license plate at issue — displaying the Confederate flag. David Cole, quoted in the National Law Journal, June 22, 2015

If you would better understand Justice Clarence Thomas’s vote in the Confederate license-plate case handed down last week, it may be helpful to turn the clock back to December 11, 2002. That was a rare moment in the modern history of the Supreme Court. For it was one of the few times that Justice Thomas spoke up during oral arguments. The case was Virginia v. Black (audio here). As revealed in the transcript of that case involving a First Amendment challenge to a state cross-burning statute, Justice Thomas expressed himself boldly when he questioned Michael Dreeben of the Department of Justice. “Thomas spoke [i]n a deep, booming, voice, shaking with emotion”:

Justice Clarence Thomas (Randy Snyder, AP)

Justice Clarence Thomas (Randy Snyder, Associated Press)

Justice Thomas: “[I]t’s my understanding that we had almost 100 years of lynching and activity in the South by the Knights of Camellia and . . . the Ku Klux Klan,  and this was a reign of terror and the cross was a symbol of that reign of terror. . . [Wasn’t] that significantly greater than [any] intimidation or a threat?”

Mr. Dreeben: “Well, I think they’re coextensive, because it is –“

Justice Thomas: “Well, my fear is, Mr. Dreeben, that you’re actually understating the symbolism [and] the effect of the cross, the burning cross. I indicated, I think, in the Ohio case, that the cross was I indicated, . . . that the cross was not a religious symbol and that it . . . was intended to have a virulent effect.  And . . .  I think that what you’re attempting to do is to fit this into our jurisprudence rather than stating more clearly what the cross was intended to accomplish and, indeed, that it is unlike any symbol in our society.”

Justice Thomas was equally forceful in his published dissent in that First Amendment case: “‘The world’s oldest, most persistent terrorist organization is not European or even Middle Eastern in origin. Fifty years before the Irish Republican Army was organized, a century before Al Fatah declared its holy war on Israel, the Ku Klux Klan was actively harassing, torturing and murdering in the United States. Today . . . its members remain fanatically committed to a course of violent opposition to social progress and racial equality in the United States.” M. Newton & J. Newton, The Ku Klux Klan: An Encyclopedia vii (1991). To me, the majority’s brief history of the Ku Klux Klan only reinforces this common understanding of the Klan as a terrorist organization, which, in its endeavor to intimidate, or even eliminate those its dislikes, uses the most brutal of methods.”

In the News

Judge Andrew Napolitano: “NAACP’s call to prosecute hate groups violates First Amendment – hate speech is protected,Bizpac Review, June 23, 2015 (Fox News video clip)

It is true, nonetheless, that Justice Thomas signed onto Justice Antonin Scalia’s majority opinion in R.A.V. v. City of St. Paul (1992). That case involved a successful First Amendment challenge to a state law prohibiting the display of a symbol that one knows or has reason to know “arouses anger, alarm or resentment in others on the basis of race, color, creed, religion or gender.” (Justice Thomas was silent during oral arguments in R.A.V.)

In his dissent in Virginia v. Black, howeverJustice Thomas sought to disassociate himself from any expansive reading of R.A.V.: “I believe that the majority errs in imputing an expressive component to the activity in question . . . (relying on one of the exceptions to the First Amendment’s prohibition on content-based discrimination outlined in R. A. V. v. St. Paul) . . . . In my view, whatever expressive value cross burning has, the legislature simply wrote it out by banning only intimidating conduct undertaken by a particular means.” But there was more here than adherence to precedent; there was the matter of understanding the nature of bigotry: “In every culture,” wrote Thomas, “certain things acquire meaning well beyond what outsiders can comprehend. That goes for both the sacred and the profane. I believe that cross burning is the paradigmatic example of the latter.”

And then there was his vote and concurrence in Capitol Square Review & Advisory Board v. Pinette (1995), wherein he wrote: “I join the Court’s conclusion that petitioner’s exclusion of the Ku Klux Klan’s cross cannot be justified on Establishment Clause grounds. But the fact that the legal issue before us involves the Establishment Clause should not lead anyone to think that a cross erected by the Ku Klux Klan is a purely religious symbol. The erection of such a cross is a political act, not a Christian one. In Klan ceremony, the cross is a symbol of white supremacy and a tool for the intimidation and harassment of racial minorities, Catholics, Jews, Communists, and any other groups hated by the Klan.”

1000Admittedly, there any number of reasons (nuanced ones) that might explain Justice Thomas’s votes in R.A.V. and Pinette, his dissent in Virginia v. Black, and his vote in the 5-4 ruling in Walker v. Sons of Confederate VeteransBut in light of that vote, and mindful of Justice Samuel Alito’s compelling dissent in Walker, one wonders: Could it be that lingering beneath all of this is some sympathy for a kind of a race-hate exception to the First Amendment? I assert nothing definitive here; I am only suggesting that there may be something in Thomas’s thinking that could allow for an exception to current First Amendment doctrine. Or consider this: Might racial bigotry be an important factor in Justice Thomas’s application of judicial formulas such as the incitement test?  In that regard, one would think that Justice Thomas might well agree with a point Justice Elena Kagan (who was in the majority) made during oral arguments in Walker:

Mr. James George: “Well, the ­­ this Court’s rule ­­ law on incitement, going back to Brandenburg v. Ohio and the Ku Klux Klan rally that this Court decided was not incitement, it ­­ is pretty thin at this point in our history, because I don’t know what the rule of incitement would be today.”

Justice Kagan: “No, but Mr. George, just the worst of the worst, whether it’s the swastika or whether it’s the most offensive racial epithet that you can imagine, and if that were on a license plate where it really is provoking violence of some kind. You know, somebody is going to ram into that car . . . .”­­

Similarly, Justice Thomas might well approve of the following statement made during oral arguments by Justice Stephen Breyer (author of the majority opinion in Walker): “Now, is there something to be said for Texas? Yes. What they’re trying to do is to prevent their official imprimatur from being given to speech that offends people.” Not just any offense, but a racial offense. It is precisely that kind of racial offense that motivates the current campaign in South Carolina to remove the Confederate flag from the state capitol grounds.

While his early votes in cases such as R.A.V. and Pinette suggest that race is not a determinative factor in Justice Thomas’s First Amendment jurisprudence, since 2002 there seems to have been shift in his view. Both his dissent in Virginia v. Black and his vote in Walker may indeed be signs of that purported shift. In the earlier, pre-Black cases, Justice Thomas voted to sustain the First Amendment claim but then voiced his disapproval of the bigoted speech at issue. In the post-Black cases, however, Justice Thomas voted to deny the First Amendment claim in such cases.

Of course, there is a good dollop of speculation here, which is therefore not beyond fair challenge. That said, sometimes it is easy to be oblivious to the obvious, to that which transcends niceties and nuances. And that something may be a key factor in Justice Thomas’s constitutional take on race-hate speech and the First Amendment. Again, I do not offer this as a hard-and-fast conclusion, but rather as something to consider — think of it as a possibility waiting to be proven.

Professor Scott Gerber

Professor Scott Gerber

Given my reservations, I invited Professor Scott Gerber, author of First Principles: The Jurisprudence of Clarence Thomas (2002), to comment on my hypothesis: “I agree with your perceptive observation about Justice Thomas’s approach to race-hate speech and the First Amendment,” he told me. “Indeed, Justice Thomas has come as close as any member of the Court ever has to accepting the Critical Race Theory approach to the issue. I have long mentioned this to my students when I teach Virginia v. Black, and I made a similar observation in a symposium essay I wrote on Justice Thomas’s First Amendment jurisprudence. The Court’s recent Confederate license plate decision provides additional support for this conclusion, and it also reminds us of how sophisticated Justice Thomas’s thinking is, especially on matters of race.”

 See Garrett Epps, “Clarence Thomas Takes On a Symbol of White Supremacy,” The Atlantic, June 18, 2015

See also Adam Clymer, “About That Flag on the Judge’s Desk,” New York Times, July 19, 1991

First Amendment Opinions by Justice Thomas

The following are the First Amendment majority opinions that Justice Thomas authored during his tenure on the Roberts Court re First Amendment free expression issues and related claims:
  1. Reed v. Town of Gilbert (2015) (vote: 9-0)
  2. Reichle v. Howards (2012) (vote: 8-0)
  3. Washington State Grange Washington State Rep. Party (2008) (vote: 7-2)

Some of his more notable separate opinions during this same period include his opinions in:

  1. McCutcheon v. FEC (2014) (concurring in the judgment)
  2. Lane v. Franks (2014) (concurring)
  3. Borough of Duryea v. Guarnieri (2011) (concurring in the judgment)
  4. Citizens United v. FEC (2010) (concurring & dissenting in part)
  5. Milavetz, Gallop & Milavetz v. United States (2010) (concurring in part & concurring in the judgment)
  6. Morse v. Frederick (2007) (concurring)
Latest Commentaries on 2014-2015 First Amendment cases

Read More

3

Reading the Tea Leaves

I want to make an observation about the remaining cases in this Supreme Court Term. From the February sitting, there are two undecided cases.  One is King v. Burwell.  The other is the Arizona redistricting case.  There are, though, three Justices who have not written a majority opinion from that sitting.  (The Chief Justice, Kennedy, and Ginsburg).  This strikes me as odd-somebody may have lost a majority along the way in one of those cases or in one that was already decided.

By contrast, from the January sitting there is only one undecided case (The Fair Housing Act/disparate impact case), and the only Justice without an opinion from that sitting is Justice Kennedy.  So he should have that one.

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The Bill of Rights as a Justification for Power

A point that I’ve developed in my new draft and that I’ll be discussing further in the next book is that the Bill of Rights does more to expand the power of government that to limit power.

How can that be?  While the provisions in the Bill of Rights are about limiting government, the use of the “Bill of Rights” brand to describe those provisions is rather different.  In practice, people refer to the Bill of Rights to justify government action.  It’s OK to do something, the argument goes, because there is a bill of rights.

Consider some examples:

1.  When people want to justify the exercise of emergency powers or special national security powers, they say “The Bill of Rights is not a suicide pact.”

2.  When the United States acquired colonies after the Spanish-American War, opponents of imperialism were mollified when Congress extended a “bill of rights” to the Philippines, even though that bill of rights was not the same as ours and was not observed all that much.

3.  When Franklin Roosevelt defended the New Deal, he often did so by observing that the government’s new initiatives did not violate the Bill of Rights.  Therefore, he said, those extensions of authority were perfectly fine.

In these example, the Bill of Rights is mainly a symbol.  Consider the following thought experiment.  Suppose a country were drafting a new constitution and I said that it would not include a bill of rights.  Would you be skeptical?  Probably.  Suppose, though, that this draft included all of the things you would want in a bill of rights but just called them something else or didn’t use that term.  What does the term add?

4

A Judicial Conniption

 

Justice Thomas’s concurring opinion today in Davis v. Ayala is quite extraordinary.  In response to Justice Kennedy’s concurrence that attacked the practice of extended solitary confinement (not an issue raised in this case), here is what he said:

I join the Court’s opinion explaining why Ayala is not entitled to a writ of habeas corpus from this or any other federal court. I write separately only to point out, in response to the separate opinion of JUSTICE KENNEDY, that the accommodations in which Ayala is housed are a far sight more spacious than those in which his victims, Ernesto Dominguez Mendez, Marcos Antonio Zamora, and Jose Luis Rositas, now rest. And, given that his victims were all 31 years of age or under, Ayala will soon have had as much or more time to enjoy those accommodations as his victims had time to enjoy this Earth.

It is true that convicted murderers get treated a far sight better than their victims.  I’m not sure what that’s supposed to prove though.

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FAN 64.1 (First Amendment News) Court Hands Down License-Plate Case — 5-4 Rejects 1-A Claim

1000Earlier today the Court handed down its ruling in Walker v. Sons of Confederate VeteransThe vote was 5-4 with Justice Stephen Breyer writing for the majority and Justice Samuel Alito in dissent (joined by the Chief Justice and Justices Scalia and Kennedy). In an unusual twist, Justice Clarence Thomas voted with the Court’s liberal bloc.

The Court held that Texas’s specialty license plate designs constitute government speech, and thus Texas was entitled to refuse to issue plates featuring SCV’s proposed design. Specifically, the Court ruled that

  1. When the government speaks it is not barred by the Free Speech Clause from determining the content of what it says, and
  2. The Court’s precedents regarding government speech provide the appropriate framework through which to approach the case

“The fact that private parties take part in the design and propagation of a message,” wrote Breyer, “does not extinguish the governmental nature of the message or transform the government’s role into that of a mere forum-provider.” He added: “Additionally, the fact that Texas vehicle owners pay annual fees in order to display specialty license plates does not imply that the plate designs are merely a forum for private speech.”

Writing in dissent, Justice Alito argued: “The Court’s decision passes off private speech as government speech and, in doing so, establishes a precedent that threatens private speech that government finds displeasing. Under our First Amendment cases, the distinction between government speech and private speech is critical. The First Amendment “does not regulate government speech,” and therefore when government speaks, it is free “to select the views that it wants to express.” Pleasant Grove City v. Summum, 555 U. S. 460, 467–468 (2009). By contrast, “[i]n the realm of private speech or expression, government regulation may not favor one speaker over another.” Rosenberger v. Rector and Visitors of Univ. of Va., 515 U. S. 819, 828 (1995).”

Later, Alito argued that the majority’s “capacious understanding of government speech takes a large and painful bite out of the First Amendment. Specialty plates may seem innocuous. They make motorists happy, and they put money in a State’s coffers. But the precedent this case sets is dangerous. While all li- cense plates unquestionably contain some government speech (e.g., the name of the State and the numbers and/or letters identifying the vehicle), the State of Texas has converted the remaining space on its specialty plates into little mobile billboards on which motorists can display their own messages. And what Texas did here was to reject one of the messages that members of a private group wanted to post on some of these little billboards be- cause the State thought that many of its citizens would find the message offensive. That is blatant viewpoint discrimination.”

Commentary: Ilya Shapiro, Supreme Court Allows Texas to Offend the First Amendment,” Cato Institute, June 18, 2015

THE COURT’S 2014-15 FREE EXPRESSION DOCKET

[last updated: 6-18-15]

Cases Decided 

  1. Elonis v. United States (argue: 12-1-14 / decided: June 1, 2015) (8-1 per Roberts) (statutory-based ruling)
  2. Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar (argued: Jan. 20, 2015 / decided: April 29, 2015) (5-4 per Roberts)
  3. Walker v. Sons of Confederate Veterans (argued 3-23-15 / decided 6-18-15) (5-4 per Breyer)
  4. Reed v. Town of Gilbert (argued 1-12-15 / decided 6-18-15) (9-0 per Thomas)

Pending Petitions*

  1. Berger v. American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina (license plate case)
  2. Thayer v. City of Worcester (last distributed for Conference of January 9, 2015)
  3. Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association, et al. (4-27-15: The Court asked the Calif. AG to respond to the petition)
  4. Central Radio Co., Inc. v. City of Norfolk (amicus brief by Eugene Volokh)
  5. Center for Competitive Politics v. Harris (emergency application for injunction pending Cert.)

Review Denied*

  1. Walker-McGill v. Stuart
  2. O’Keefe v. Chisholm
  3. King v. Christie
  4. Apel v. United States 
  5. Dariano v. Morgan Hill Unified School District
  6. The Bronx Household of Faith v. Board of Education of the City of New York 
  7. Arneson v. 281 Care Committee
  8. Kagan v. City of New Orleans
  9. ProtectMarriage.com-Yes on 8 v. Bowen
  10. Clayton v. Niska
  11. Pregnancy Care Center of New York v. City of New York 
  12. City of Indianapolis, Indiana v. Annex Books, Inc.
  13. Ashley Furniture Industries, Inc. v. United States 
  14. Mehanna v. United States
  15. Stop This Insanity Inc Employee Leadership Fund et al  v. Federal Election Commission
  16. Vermont Right to Life Committee, et al v. Sorrell

Though these lists are not comprehensive, I try to track as many cases as possible. If you know of a cert. petition that is not on these lists, kindly inform me and I will post it.   

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FAN 64 (First Amendment News) More on the Roberts Court & the First Amendment — the Women Justices

How is First Amendment freedom of expression law being shaped by the current Court? One way to answer that question is to focus on the Justices themselves and on their assignments, voting records, and voting alignments. Mindful of such concerns, I plan to do a series of posts on the Roberts Court. When complete, I hope to prepare a summary and analysis of the Roberts Court and its record in this area of the law.

In this second installment, and following my profile of Chief Justice John Roberts, I continue by way of some facts and figures about the contributions of Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor, and Elena Kagan. Here are a few for starters:

  • Though the Roberts Court has handed down 39 First Amendment free expression opinions, it has rendered only 17 during the tenure of all three of the Court’s female Justices.
  • Justice Sotomayor took her seat in August of 2009, and the first First Amendment free expression case she voted on was Citizens United v. FEC (2010) (5-4, joined dissent). Since her time on the Court the Justices have rendered 23 First Amendment free expression opinions.
  • Justice Kagan took her seat in August of 2010, and the first First Amendment free expression case she voted on was Snyder v. Phelps (2011) (8-1, joined majority). Since her time on the Court the Justices have rendered 17 First Amendment free expression opinions (she did not participate in 2 of those cases).

Now onto the tallies in First Amendment free expression cases:

Number of Majority/Plurality Opinions

  • Justice Ginsburg: 3 out of 39 [Roberts = 13 & Kennedy & Scalia 5 each during same period]
  • Justice Sotomayor: 2 out of 23 [Roberts = 9 & Kennedy = 4 during same period]
  • Justice Kagan: 0 out of 15* [Roberts = 6 & Kennedy = 3 during same period] [*EK did not participate in 2 of the 17 cases decided during her tenure]

Number of Separate Opinions

  • Justice Ginsburg: 5 out of 39 (2 dissenting opinions, 1 dissenting & concurring in part & 2 concurring opinions)
  • Justice Sotomayor: 2 out of 23 (2 concurring opinions)
  • Justice Kagan: 2 out of 15 (2 dissenting opinions) [*EK did not participate in 2 of the 17 cases decided during her tenure]

Total Number of Opinions by RBG, SS & EK

  • 14 (includes total majority & separate opinions) [By contrast: CJ Roberts alone has authored 13 majority/plurality opinions]

Justice Ginsburg’s majority opinions

  1. Christian Legal Society v. Martinez (5-4, 2010) (1-A claim denied)
  2. Golan v. Holder (6-2, 2012) (1-A claim denied)
  3. Wood v Moss (9-0, 2014) (1-A claim denied)

Justice Sotomayor’s majority opinions

  1. Milavetz, Gallop, & Milavetz v. United States (9-0, 2010) (1-A claim denied)
  2. Lane v. Franks (9-0, 2014) (1-A claim sustained)

Thus, in the 15 such cases in which all the women Justices participated, they authored only one majority opinion (Lane v. Franks). (Justices Ginsburg and Sotomayor participated in 17 such cases during the same period and the number of majority remained the same.)

Record re 5-4 Majority/Plurality Opinions: Of the eleven 5-4 Roberts Court majority or plurality opinions in First Amendment free expression cases, only one was authored by any of the Court’s female members (Justice Ginsburg). There were six 5-4 judgments during Justice Sotomayor’s tenure, and four such judgments during Justice Kagan’s tenure.

(CJ Roberts leads in this area with 5 such opinions followed by Justices Kennedy and Alito with two apiece.)

Justice Ginsburg’s separate opinions Read More

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More on Signed Appellate Opinions

Paul Horwitz has written a characteristically thoughtful post over at PrawfsBlawg on the issue that I raised the other day about whether we should still permit per curiam opinions.  I have a couple of additional observations on my end:

1.  Without signed opinions, outsiders would find it hard to assess the quality of individual appellate judges.  This matters when you want to think about possible candidates for promotion.  Instead, you’d have to rely on insider information that would be less reliable (“I heard from so-and-so’s law clerk that Judge X wrote that opinion.”).

2.  There is an exception to Point #1.  When judges sit on panels of three, the dissenter would always be named.  Thus, what we’d know about appellate judges would come largely from their dissents.  Or one could imagine more separate concurring opinions if that was the only way to get one’s name out for public consumption.  I’m not sure that this be a great system for assessing judges.

3.  Why do people care that a given opinion was written by Henry J. Friendly?  I think the answer is that they think that opinion will just be better.  While all panel opinions are formally equal, that does not mean that they are equally useful.  Knowing the judge’s reputation (good or bad) reduces search costs for attorneys and scholars, and that matters in the real world.

One last thought–there is a strong argument in favor of anonymous publication as a way of forcing people to focus on the arguments and not on the personalities.  (Hello, Publius.)  Of course, that argument could apply just as well to law review articles as it does to opinions.

 

 

 

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FAN 63.3 (First Amendment News) Court denies cert in abortion ultrasound case despite circuit split — Balkanization of 1-A rights?

Twenty-four states now require an ultrasound to be performed or offered to a woman prior to the performance of an abortion. Five states have enacted essentially the same display-and-describe requirement at issue in this case, and an additional four states require a physician to provide a simultaneous explanation of an ultrasound image upon a woman’s request. — Cert. Petition of Attorney General of North Carolina

This past Monday the Court denied cert. in Walker-McGill v. Stuart with Justice Antonin Scalia dissenting from that denial. The issue in the case was whether North Carolina’s statutory requirement that an ultrasound image be displayed and described to the patient prior to an abortion procedure violates the First and Fourteenth Amendment rights of the provider.

In his cert. petition, the attorney general of North Carolina argued that the ruling in the Fourth Circuit sustaining the First Amendment claim ran counter to those in the Fifth and Eighth Circuits.

In their reply brief, the counsel for the Respondents refuted that claim. “There is no circuit conflict warranting this Court’s review,” they argued, “because no court has ever considered, let alone upheld, a law imposing as ‘unprecedented’ of a ‘burden on the right of professional speech’ as the [North Carolina] Requirement does. . . . And all courts—including the Fifth and Eighth Circuits—agree that a state regulation compelling physicians to engage in ideological speech [– as contrasted with truthful, non-misleading information relevant to a patient’s decision to have an abortion –] is subject to searching First Amendment scrutiny.”

Moreover, they argued that “the regulations approved by the Fifth and Eighth Circuits—which both courts found to be non-ideological and subject only to rationality review — are fundamentally different from the Requirement in ways that bear directly on the appropriate level of scrutiny. No court has upheld a physician-speech regulation as uniquely intrusive as the Requirement” contained in the North Carolina law.”

Consider in this regard what Judge Harvey Wilkinson stated in his opinion for his Fourth Circuit panel: “Insofar as our decision on the applicable standard of review differs from the positions taken by the Fifth and Eighth Circuits in cases examining the constitutionality of abortion regulations under the First Amendment, we respectfully disagree. . . . With respect, our sister circuits read too much into Casey and Gonzales. The single paragraph in Casey does not assert that physicians forfeit their First Amendment rights in the procedures surrounding abortions, nor does it announce the proper level of scrutiny to be applied to abortion regulations that compel speech to the extraordinary extent present here.”

Will a majority of the Court be as quick to sustain a First Amendment claim in “pro-choice” abortion case as it was in McCullen v. Coakley (2014), a “pro-life” abortion case?

Too fine a distinction? 

Is the distinction proffered by the counsel for the Respondents too fine or too nuanced to be of any meaningful import in future cases? If so, does the cert. denial in Walker-McGill v. Stuart point to a balkanization of constitutional rights in this area? In other words, is the ideological warring we have witnessed in the abortion context now spreading to First Amendment law? Can we now expect speech related to abortion to be dragged into this ideological morass replete with all the confusion that comes with that?

Fewer than four votes

David Horowitz

David Horowitz

However that may be, the Court’s cert. denial seemed somewhat surprising. As David Horowitz, the executive director of the Media Coalition, observed: “I’m very surprised that this was a case that no one could find four votes for. I would’ve thought one side or the other could have done that. The failure to do so suggests, at least, that Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Kennedy do not want to take the case, or one of those two and one of the liberal Justices felt likewise.”

See also Adam Liptak, “Supreme Court Rejects North Carolina’s Appeal on Pre-Abortion Ultrasounds,” New York Times, June 5, 2015, and “Supreme Court Won’t Revive North Carolina Abortion Law,” Associated Press, June 15, 2015

1

Conspiracy in the Lincoln Assassination Trial

On Friday, the DC Circuit issued its decision in Al Bahlul v. United States.  The opinion held that Congress exceeded its Article I powers by authorizing a military commission to try a Guantanamo detainee for the crime on conspiracy.  I cannot claim any special expertise on this question, but the dueling opinions (Judge Rogers for the Court and Judge Henderson in dissent) do address one point that I know something about–the trial of John Wilkes’s Booth’s accomplices.  We are in the midst of the 150th anniversary of that military trial, which I spent a chapter discussing in my biography of Bingham.

The Court declined to rely on the Lincoln assassination military trial as authority for Al Bahlul’s conspiracy conviction, and I think that this was correct.  First, the assassins were not charged with conspiracy.  The actual charge was “traitorous conspiracy,” not conspiring to commit treason.  What is that?  Basically, it was a charge invented just for them to avoid Article III’s requirements for proving treason while still conveying the idea that they had done something treasonable.  The dissent (which oddly spends a lot of time citing Chief Justice Rehnquist’s book that discusses the Lincoln trial, rather than the primary sources), errs in reaching the opposite conclusion.

Moreover, the Lincoln assassination commission was filled with irregularities and thus is not a precedent people ought to read broadly.    The District Court opinion that rejected the habeas corpus petition of some of the convicted men was not convincing, and even if it was right the special circumstances presented by the murder of the President in wartime are far removed from the cases of the Guantanamo detainees.