Category: General Law

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FAN 51.1 (First Amendment News) Oklahoma ACLU Issues Separate Statements on Racist Chants

March 9, 2015 (ACLU of Oklahoma Press Release)

OKLAHOMA CITY – Following this weekend’s news of members of the University of Oklahoma’s Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity chanting about lynching African Americans, and the investigative and disciplinary actions in progress, the American Civil Liberties Union of Oklahoma as released the following statements:

The following is attributable to Ryan Kiesel, ACLU of Oklahoma Executive Director:

Sixty-six years ago and after two trips to the United States Supreme Court, Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher became the first African American student to be admitted to the University of Oklahoma College of Law. Even after her admission, she was still segregated from her white peers. With a legal team that included Thurgood Marshall, her case played a critical role in the end of the separate but equal doctrine. As monumental as that victory may have been, the video showing SAE fraternity members at the University of Oklahoma singing a disgraceful racist chant serves as a stark reminder that racism is very much a present reality.

We offer our sincere appreciation to the students, faculty and staff who have joined together in solidarity against hate and racism. They remind us that the spark in Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher still persists in the minds of those who benefitted from her work. Let history say the same of us. At the very least, this awful incident must prompt a robust conversation and a review of every aspect of campus life so that we can combat persistent discrimination and realize racial justice. And as the fates of the students at the center of this controversy unfold, we encourage the administration to demonstrate their commitment to due process; for it is often in protecting the rights of the very worst, we are able to demonstrate our fullest commitment to justice. (emphasis added)

The following is attributable to Brady Henderson, ACLU of Oklahoma Legal Director:

We join with OU President David Boren, as well as the majority of OU students, faculty, and alumni, and with an overwhelming number of Oklahomans in their disgust at SAE’s conduct this past Saturday night. While many Americans paused this weekend to reflect on the 50th Anniversary of Martin Luther King’s famous march in Selma, Alabama, these students marked the occasion by mocking one of the saddest chapters of American history, the mob-fueled, government-sanctioned murder of African Americans. These students remind us that despite King’s victory in Selma, and other battles won by countless citizens with the courage to face hate head-on, racism is not dead or even dormant in modern America, even on our college campuses.

We applaud President Boren’s aggressive response to the SAE’s actions, and we encourage the OU administration to be equally aggressive in ensuring that the due process rights of students remain protected throughout any disciplinary processes against Fraternity members. The deep-rooted problem of racism will not be solved by discipline alone, but by open and honest dialogue and an accounting of where we are and where we need to go not just in our universities, but in the communities university students will one day lead.(emphasis added)

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Population Control in Griswold v. Connecticut

I was reading Petitioner’s Brief in Griswold, and was struck by this passage:

Population expansion poses a momentous problem for this country and the world today. The issue must be ranked as equal in importance to the questions of disarmament and peace, automation, poverty and civil rights. Indeed population control is a part, and a significant part, of each of these burning problems. We will not attempt to present in this brief the facts pertaining to the “population explosion.” It is now fully apparent that the public welfare of the world, this nation, and all its constituent parts, requires immediate consideration of measures to plan and limit population growth. And any such program must obviously rely upon the use of scientific methods for preventing conception.

The Federal Government has recognized the problem and is actively seeking a solution. In December of 1962 United States policy was officially stated by Richard H. Gardner, Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs, speaking to the United Nations:

‘In the opinion of my Government progress toward (the) high aims of the United Nations Charter cannot be measured merely by increases in gross national product. The object of economic development is the welfare and dignity of the individual human beings. If the condition of the individual, and not gross statistics, is to be the measure of our progress, then it is absolutely essential that we be concerned with population trends . . . . So long as we are concerned with the quality of life we have no choice but to be concerned with the quantity of life.’

‘We believe these statements are true not just for some but for all nations . . . .

‘Within the United States our local, state and federal governments are all devoting attention to population trends as part of their planning for the improvement of individual welfare.’

President Kennedy supported these developments. Thus in a speech on June 5, 1963, calling for solution of the problem of hunger in the world, he made clear the interest of this country when he said, ‘Population increases have become a matter of serious concern.’

And President Johnson, in a significant and much-noted passage in his State of the Union Address this year, emphasized that additional action was necessary and would be taken:

‘I will seek new ways to use our knowledge to help deal with the explosion in world population and the growing scarcity of world resources.’

We are confronted then with an acute world-wide problem that is pressing for immediate solution. That solution must involve, as a major element, the voluntary use of contraceptive devices to limit the number of children born. Viewed in this context, in the light of world opinion and world needs, the contrary judgment of the Connecticut statutes, left-overs from a by-gone era, can have little standing.

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The Purposes of a Bill of Rights

As part of my research for my next book (and perhaps for another paper), I’m thinking through what bills of rights do and why we have them.  The best discussion of this subject was in an article by David Strauss written in 1992, where he identified three ways of thinking about a bill of rights:

1.  A Bill of Rights is Just a Code:  A bill of rights simply reflects whatever a given society or jurisdiction deems important.

2.  A Bill of Rights Is Only About Fundamental Rights:  You can understand a bill of rights as something that only addresses rights that no democratic society can do without.

3.  A Bill of Rights Is About Political Failure:  You need a bill of of rights to deal only with rights that elected institutions are likely to invade or abuse.

Depending on which of these three views you take, different provisions in bills of rights (and bills of rights more generally) look different.  The first theory describes many state bills of rights, which include all sorts of things that look pretty ordinary.  The second theory would reject the inclusion of many things that are in the Bill of Rights, such as the right to a grand jury indictment or a jury trial.  The third would posit that the Third Amendment is the sort of thing that need not be in a bill of rights since no elected legislature would quarter troops in homes.  And so on.

Another way of examining this question asks what role bills of rights have served historically (let’s just focus on the United States in this post).  For instance,

1.  Justifying Revolution:  The first state bills of rights, especially the Virginia Declaration of Rights, were all revolutionary statements justifying independence.  This is why they contain many broad statements on natural rights and read like the Declaration of Independence.

2.  Defending Federalism:  This, of course, was the purpose of the first set of amendments in 1791.  The Anti-Federalists rallied around a bill of rights as a way to limit the new federal government.

3.  Limiting the Police Power:  This was the purpose of state of bills of rights after the Revolution.

4.  Limiting Federalism:  This was the purpose of John Bingham and those who called the first set of amendments a bill of rights during Reconstruction.  The Bill of Rights trumps states’-rights.

5.  Justifying Colonialism:  As I explained in a prior post, doubts about whether America should govern colonies acquired during the Spanish-American War were soothed by giving those colonies bills of rights.

6.  Justifying Judicial Review:  This was a purpose of the Bill of Rights after the New Deal.  People are more likely to accept judicial review framed as an application of the Bill of Rights.

I’m working on one or two other angles that I may post on later.

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FAN 51 (First Amendment News) Journalists, Scholars & Others Pay Tribute to Anthony Lewis

Anthony Lewis . . . created a new approach to legal journalism. He combined sophisticated legal analysis with an unparalleled ability to write in plain, lucid English, translating the Court’s decisions, explaining their implications, and assessing their significance for a broad readership. David Cole (May 9, 2013)

Tony Lewis (credit: NYT)

Tony Lewis (credit: NYT)

Anthony Lewis (1927-2013) — reporter, columnist, educator, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and scholar. He was all of those things and more. I grew up on Tony Lewis (he was born Joseph Anthony Lewis). He was right there, in the New York Times, which in those days you couldn’t get on the Internet – there was none. If you were outside New York you were lucky to find a hard copy at a good hotel or news- stand.  A Lewis column was a staple of one’s diet for those who followed the Court and related matters. And what a corpus of work he set his name to — some 5,600 some articles and columns and five books. That is reason enough to single out the Lewis byline.

→ See Adam Liptak, “Anthony Lewis, Supreme Court Reporter Who Brought Law to Life, Dies at 85,” NYT, March 25, 2013

Happily, the Missouri Law Review recently paid tribute to Tony Lewis in a symposium issue with 13 contributors, several of whom once worked with him and were also close friends of his. (Note: The links below may not open in Safari but should open in Firefox and Chrome.)

  1. Foreword: The Art, Craft, and Future of Legal Journalism: A Tribute to Anthony Lewis, by Richard Ruben
  2. Keynote: Anthony Lewis and the First Amendment, by Adam Liptak

Articles

  1. Anthony Lewis: What He Learned at Harvard Law School, by Lincoln Caplan
  2. Anthony Lewis: Pioneer in the Court’s Pressroom, by Lyle Denniston
  3. The Rigorous Romantic: Anthony Lewis on the Supreme Court Beat, by Linda Greenhouse
  4. Press Freedom and Coverage in the U.S. and Kosovo: A Series of Comparisons and Recommendations, by Ben Holden
  5. A Tiger with No Teeth: The Case for Fee Shifting in State Public Records Law, by Heath Hooper & Charles N. Davis
  6. Anthony Lewis, by Dahlia Lithwick
  7. Legal Journalism Today: Change or Die, by Howard Mintz
  8. Institutionalizing Press Relations at the Supreme Court: The Origins of the Public Information Office, by Jonathan Peters
  9. Setting the Docket: News Media Coverage of Our Courts – Past, Present and an Uncertain Future, by Gene Policinski
  10. As Today’s Tony Lewises Disappear, Courts Fill Void, by David A. Sellers
  11. Making Judge-Speak Clear Amidst the Babel of Lawspeakers, by Michael A. Wolff

Tony Lewis’ Fantasy

You lead me to tell you my fantasy. A happy fantasy. [It is this:] our next President does the equivalent of what Jefferson did in his first inaugural when he was so hated by the Federalists and began his inaugural speech by saying, “We are all Republicans – we are all Federalists.” The next president sets out to say two things. One, there’s nobody unpatriotic here. We’re all Americans together. And two, this administration is going to be an administration of law; where law has been rolled back, we’re going to bring it to the fore again. This country is a government of laws, not men. That’s my fantasy. Will it happen? I doubt it. But I sure think it ought to. (Sept. 12, 2006 Interview, Walter Lippmann House, Cambridge, Mass.)

Go here for a C-SPAN interview I did with Tony in connection with his book Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment (2001).

Media Groups Challenge Claim for Profits in the Defamation Case

Jesse Ventura

Jesse Ventura

The case is Ventura v. Kyle, which is presently before the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. The matter involves a defamation lawsuit brought in federal court by Jesse Ventura (former governor of Minnesota and Navy veteran) against HarperCollins concerning its publication of the book American Sniper by Chris Kyle. Last summer, a jury awarded Ventura $1.8 million from the Kyle estate. The case is now on appeal.

Yesterday Floyd Abrams joined by Susan Buckley and Merriam Mikhail filed an amicus brief on behalf of 33 media companies and organizations contesting the award. In it, the trio of lawyers advanced two main arguments:

  1. The Common Law Does Not Recognize and the Constitution Does Not Permit an Award of a Book’s Profits as a Remedy for Defamation, and
  2. The Award of Profits from American Sniper is Tantamount to an Award of Punitive Damages, Damages that Are Not Permitted Against the Estate

“[T]he law of libel,” they maintain, has “been clear that while damages could be awarded to victims of libel, the awards would be limited to the recovery of money for the injuries said to have been sustained by plaintiffs and not for amounts claimed to have been received by defendants. That proposition has rarely been questioned until this case. Indeed, we know of only one case, decided more than 65 years ago, that is directly on point: Hart v. E.P. Dutton & Co., 93 N.Y.S.2d 871 (Sup. Ct. 1949), aff’d, 98 N.Y.S.2d 773 (App. Div. 1950), appeal denied, 99 N.Y.S.2d 1014 (App. Div. 1950). Rooted in constitutional concerns and the common law relating to libel, the Hart decision holds that a claim for profits may not be asserted in the defamation context. We are aware of no case before or after Hart to the contrary.”

The briefs concludes: “Where, as here, there was no showing of evil intent sufficient to satisfy [Minnesota’s punitive damages law], where, as here, an award of profits can serve no deterrent or punitive purpose, and where, as here, the First Amendment’s abhorrence of exorbitant damage awards untethered to a plaintiff’s true injury is clearly in play, this Court should not be the first to sanction an unprecedented award of a book’s profits.”

 As noted in their amicus brief, the issue of an award of profits in defamation cases is addressed in Dan Dobbs, Law of Remedies: Damages – Equity – Restitution (2d ed.) (“One reason to deny the restitution claim is the threat it presents to free speech. Another is the difficulty of apportioning the publisher’s profit between his own effort and investment and the defamatory material.”)

Geoffrey Stone Weighs in on Oklahoma Expulsion Controversy  Read More

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A Negative Right of Publicity?

I was batting around the following issue with a student today.  Suppose that a celebrity makes a positive statement about a product or is seen publicly using that product.  The product manufacturer, horrified by any association with this person, issues a statement saying that they are not associated with the celebrity.

Would the celebrity have a right of publicity claim under these circumstances?  One could argue that the corporate statement is an unauthorized use of the celebrity’s name and image for commercial gain.  In this example, though, you would have a negative or reverse endorsement of the brand.  The firm would say that their brand is defined in part by not being somebody.

Presumably, a firm has some First Amendment interest (and a Lanham Act interest) in disassociating itself from unwanted people or actions.  What limits, if any, are there on these interests?

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Justice Souter’s Papers

To follow up on yesterday’s post, media accounts from a few years ago state that Justice Souter donated his Supreme Court papers to the New Hampshire Historical Society with the condition that they not be opened  until 2059.  This restriction strikes me as hard to justify, though of course Justice Souter could still change his mind and open them up sooner.  I will be writing to Justice Souter’s chambers to confirm.

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The Papers of the Justices

One frustration for legal historians and Supreme Court scholars is that there is no uniform policy on the preservation and availability of the Justices’ papers.  Unlike presidents, Justices can destroy their papers, make them completely unavailable, give them to anyone, or impose all sorts of crazy conditions on access.  I would prefer that a federal statute be enacted to fix this problem, but in the meantime it would be useful to know what each Justice (retired and sitting) plans to do with their papers.

Accordingly, I’m going to write each Justice’s chambers to ask about his or her plans.  Some will say that they do not know yet, but the scholarly community would benefit from knowing about the ones who have decided.  I’ll let you know what I find out.

UPDATE:  For example, Chief Justice Rehnquist’s papers on his Supreme Court tenure are closed until every member of the Court that served with him dies.  That’s a LONG time.

UPDATE #2:  An alert reader points out that Chief Justice Rehnquist’s papers actually open after every member of the Court that served with him in a given year dies.  For example, his Court papers from 1972-1975 are open (they are held by the Hoover Institution at Stanford).  When Justice Stevens dies, the files from 1975-1981 will become available.  (Presumably that will include all of Chief Justice Roberts’ papers as a law clerk.)

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FAN 50.1 (First Amendment News) Lanham Act Violates the First Amendment Says ACLU

On March 5, 2015,  the national ACLU and its Virginia Chapter filed an amicus brief in the federal district court for the Eastern District of Virginia challenging the constitutionality of Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act (15 U.S.C. § 1052(a)) as violative of the First Amendment. The case is Pro-Football, Inc. v. Blackhorse, et al (# 1:14-cv-01043-GBL-IDD).

aclu_logoHere is a description of the case: “In the wake of the [Trademark Trial and Appeal Board’s] decision last year to cancel a number of federal trademark registrations for the Washington Redskins team name, on the grounds that the marks were disparaging to Native Americans at the time they were issued in violation of section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, Pro-Football, Inc. (“PFI”)—the corporation that owns the Redskins franchise—sought de novo review of that decision in the United States District Court. Filing a district court action rather than appealing allowed PFI to raise claims that were beyond the powers of the TTAB to address—chiefly that section 2(a) is unconstitutional.” Craig C. Reilly is the lead counsel for the Petitioners.

Rebecca K. Glenberg filed the ACLU’s amicus brief. In that brief, the ACLU advanced four arguments:

  1. The Lanham Act regulates private expression protected by the First Amendment
  2. Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act impermissibly mandates viewpoint discrimination
  3. Section 2(a) burdens private speech by placing an unconstitutional condition on the receipt of valuable government benefits, and
  4. Section 2(a) is unconstitutionally vague and over broad.

Here is an excerpt from the ACLU brief:

Few principles in constitutional law are as settled as the First Amendment’s prohibition on government regulation of private speech based on viewpoint. The courts have never blessed a government program that permits government actors to determine the acceptability of a speaker’s viewpoint and then condition benefits based on that determination. The First Amendment harms are magnified when such regulation of speech rests on vague and subjective terms that provide no meaningful notice to speakers as to which speech the government will find acceptable, and thereby risk—and in this case, ensure—inconsistent and discriminatory application.These evergreen principles hold no less true simply because they arise in the context of trademark law. Yet Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1052(a), not only condones but mandates viewpoint-based discrimination in the provision of trademark registration. Section 2(a) prohibits the registration of any trademark interpreted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (“PTO”) to be immoral, scandalous, or disparaging to any persons, institutions, beliefs, or national symbols. It is indisputable that registration of a mark provides substantial benefits to a trademark holder; it is also true that many trademarks involve expressive speech and association. Therefore, by authorizing the government to deny registration of certain marks because of a viewpoint-based determination about the character of expressive speech, Section 2(a) violates the First Amendment.

Lee Rowland, Esha Bhandari (both of the national ACLU) and Brett Max Kaufman (Technology Law & Policy Clinic, New York University School of Law) were also on the ACLU amicus brief.

[HT: Anthony Romero]

UPDATE: See commentary here  by Professor Eugene Volokh.

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FAN 50 (First Amendment News) ACLU’s 2015 Workplan & the First Amendment — Anthony Romero Responds

In my last FAN post I noted that the ACLU’s 2015 Workplan (an eight-page informational and fundraising document) had only a passing reference to the First Amendment — a mainstay of the ACLU since its founding. There was no highlighted listing of free speech rights in the categories of activities to be protected. Furthermore, a February 24, 2015 two-page ACLU fundraising letter concerning the 2015 Workplan contained no reference whatsoever re protecting free speech rights. In light of this, I invited the ACLU’s Executive Director Anthony Romero “to explain why protecting our First Amendment freedoms did not receive greater and more expanded attention in the national ACLU’s 2015 Workplan.”

Mr. Romero kindly accepted my invitation and his response of February 27th is set out below. As you can see, protecting free speech freedoms continues to be an important part of the ACLU’s mission even if its fundraising letters sometimes downplay or overlook all the fine First Amendment work the group does.

Burt Neuborne

Burt Neuborne

Unfortunately, Mr. Romero declined to do a Q&A with me, for now at least — but my invitation remains open.

Meanwhile, I am pleased to say that I am scheduled to do a Q&A with Professor Burt Neuborne, who served as the National Legal Director of the ACLU from 1981-86 and who has just published a book entitled Madison’s Music: On Reading the First Amendment.

Stay tuned.  

______________________________________________________________________________

Dear Mr. Collins:

Anthony Romero

Anthony Romero

I appreciate your concern that the 2015 Workplan did not contain a section devoted to the ACLU’s efforts defending First Amendment freedom of expression, but I want to assure you that this remains a robust, bedrock area of our work to which we remain fully committed. As we note in the Workplan, the issues we chose to focus on in that document are just the tip of the iceberg in terms of the ACLU’s work. The Workplan is our annual opportunity to highlight certain broad issue areas and our funding goals to continue to move forward in those particular areas of our work.

Moreover, the issue areas outlined in our Workplan tend to be those where there exists a national trend – such as a coordinated effort to erode rights (e.g., reproductive rights, voter ID laws) or an opportunity for new gains (e.g., freedom to marry, mass incarceration) – or those where recent events warrant a highly coordinated, national effort on the part of the ACLU (e.g., government surveillance, privacy & technology, police misconduct).

First Amendment issues come up throughout our work and play an important role in many of our cases. At the national office, this work comes under the umbrella of our Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project which is dedicated to protecting and expanding the First Amendment freedoms of expression, association, and inquiry; expanding the right to privacy and increasing the control that individuals have over their personal information; and ensuring that civil liberties are enhanced rather than compromised by new advances in science and technology. The project is currently working on a variety of issues, including political protest, freedom of expression online, privacy of electronic information, journalists’ rights, scientific freedom, and openness in the courts.

The project routinely briefs critical First Amendment issues in the Supreme Court and the federal Courts of Appeal. In this past year, we have authored and submitted three friend-of-the-court briefs to the Supreme Court arguing for maximal free speech protections, including: a brief arguing that a political candidate had the right to challenge a law criminalizing “political lies,” (brief available here); a brief arguing that the government must meet a high bar in order for a jury to convict an individual for a “true threat,” whether online or off (brief available here); and, just last week, a brief supporting the Sons of Confederate Veterans’ challenge to Texas’ censorship of “offensive” messages on specialty license plates (brief available here). The ACLU is and has always been fully committed to protecting free speech, even when that speech may be offensive or controversial to many.

[RC: The ACLU also recently filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court in Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar, the judicial election campaign solicitation case.]

The project also maintains a strategic litigation docket focused on new First Amendment issues of national concern. For example, in the last few months we filed a First Amendment claim on behalf of media clients challenging Ohio’s censorship of execution access (case page here), as well as a groundbreaking challenge to Arizona’s recent anti-nudity law – one of numerous such state bills passed in the name of prohibiting “revenge porn,” but drafted so broadly as to function as a broad ban on sharing lawful nudity; that case page is available here. Of course, we also engage in diverse non-litigation advocacy and public education on free expression issues; you can read about our recent First Amendment-related issue advocacy at this link.

aclu_logoFurthermore, our First Amendment freedom of expression work is somewhat unique in that a large share of it involves responding to threats or incidents that occur on the local level and not generally as part of a broader, coordinated threat to freedom of expression. For as long as the ACLU has existed, the vast majority of First Amendment cases have been litigated by our affiliates. At the state level, First Amendment litigation tends to comprise a large portion – in many states perhaps even a majority – of ACLU affiliates’ litigation dockets.

So while free speech work remains a core, priority area of focus for the ACLU, much of the on-the-ground work of preventing or challenging restrictions of freedom of expression is carried out by ACLU attorneys and lobbyists in our local affiliate offices—often, with assistance and resources from the national office. A salient example of this is the ACLU of Missouri’s recent work to protect the rights of protesters in Ferguson; the national office assisted when a federal agency (the FAA) entered a no-fly zone which we believed to improperly limit media access. I’ve also included (at the bottom of this email) some links to our news releases on a selection of recent, ACLU First Amendment cases brought by both the national office and state affiliates, for your reference.

Mr. Collins, I hope this reply provides some clarity with respect to your concerns. Please rest assured that the ACLU remains committed to staunchly defending freedom of speech and expression.

All my best,

Anthony Romero

ACLU work on freedom of protest in Ferguson (highlights) Read More