Category: Conferences


Berkshire Hathaway 50th Anniversary Symposium

I’m honored to be giving the keynote address at the Museum of American Finance symposium on the 50th anniversary of Berkshire Hathaway under Warren Buffett on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 at the Museum on Wall Street.  As the Museum explains:  “When Warren Buffett took control of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. in 1965, it was a small textile company. Through a combination of value investing, exceptional management and savvy acquisitions, Buffett has transformed the firm into one of the most profitable, successful and highly-emulated corporations in American history. ”  The impressive program schedule follows.

Museum of American Finance

8:00-9:00 am
Fireside Chat
Byron D. Trott, chairman and CEO of BDT & Company and source for several of Berkshire’s important acquisitions, will be interviewed by Carol Loomis, long-time editor of Fortune magazine and editor of Buffett’s annual letter to shareholders.

9:15-10:15 am
Panel 1: Investors Inspired by Berkshire Hathaway
Roger Lowenstein (moderator), financial journalist and author of the best-selling Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist and, among other works, the newly-published America’s Bank: The Epic Struggle to Create the Federal Reserve
Bill Ackman, founder and CEO of Pershing Square Capital Management, L.P.
Seth A. Klarman, president and CEO of The Baupost Group, L.L.C.

10:30-11:30 am
Panel 2: Berkshire Hathaway Shareholders
Jason Zweig (moderator), Wall Street Journal columnist and editor of the revised edition of The Intelligent Investor
Paul Lountzis, president of Lountzis Asset Management LLC
Thomas Russo, partner at Gardner Russo & Gardner LLC
Whitney Tilson, founder and managing partner of Kase Capital Management LLC

11:30 am-12:15 pm
Lunch Break

12:15-1:15 pm
Panel 3: Value of Partnerships
Jim Grant (moderator), founder and publisher of Grant’s Interest Rate Observer
Thomas Gayner, president and chief investment officer of Markel Corporation
John C. Phelan, managing partner of MSD Capital

1:30-2:30 pm
Afternoon Keynote
Lawrence Cunningham, author of Berkshire Beyond Buffett, co-author of The Essays of Warren Buffett and the Henry St. George Tucker III Research Professor of Law at George Washington University

Tickets and Admission 

General admission: $325
Current MoAF and NYSSA members: $125

All guests will receive a complimentary copy of The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Corporate America, courtesy of the editor and publisher, Lawrence Cunningham.


LSA Retro-Recap Day 0: I Miss My Friend

Hello from Seattle! Over the next few days, I will describe some of the best things I saw at the 2015 annual meeting of the Law and Society Association (which was held from May 28-31). As I did back in 2013, my plan is to discuss one or two papers with high VOSFOTWOAS— Value Over Season Four Of The Wire Or A Separation.

Before getting to the recap, though, I want to remember Dan Markel. I did not know Dan very well, nowhere near as well as many other law professors or most of the folks who blog here. I met Dan in person exactly 5 LSA’s ago, in Chicago. I can remember the moment when I first saw him. He walked into a conference room with what I instantly recognized as the sleep deprivation that affects all new parents (and the glow that demarks the good ones). His hand was the first in the air during the questioning period then, as it was in nearly every other session I saw him at. I made a game to myself of trying to beat him to the punch in asking a question; I always lost.

I once read a piece in the New Yorker that, to my memory, said something like: people worry that caffeine will interfere with the real you, but after a while the person you are on caffeine is the real you.* I like to imagine (perhaps without warrant) that the person Dan was at conferences, Conference Dan, was the real Dan. Intense. Reveling in the attention of friends. Generous in facilitating connections. Enthusiastic about your ideas to the point of disregarding the rules of social comportment.

As the yahrzeit of his death approaches and I sit in a bustling hotel lobby, I miss Conference Dan, although this sense loss is infinitesimal compared to the ache that I feel for his family. I wish I had been able to better know Dan outside of these conferences. I still flip through the conference program to see what he is presenting. I schedule time for a Prawsblog happy hour that will not happen. I rush to raise my hand after the chair asks for questions, only to realize that it is alone in the air.


*A quick Googling suggests that the line closest line to the one I (mis-)remembered is this one by Malcolm Gladwell: “Part of what it means to be human in the modern age is that we have come to construct our emotional and cognitive states not merely from the inside out–with thought and intention–but from the outside in, with chemical additives. The modern personality is, in this sense, a synthetic creation: skillfully regulated and medicated and dosed with caffeine so that we can always be awake and alert and focused when we need to be.”


ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 05.20.15


The Spring 2015 issue of the New Mexico Law Review is devoted to the TV show Breaking Bad. Here’s a link to the issue’s intriguing contents, which includes such articles as Max Minzer’s Breaking Bad in the Classroom, Elizabeth N. Jones’ The Good and (Breaking) Bad of Deceptive Police Practices, and Jennifer W. Reynolds’ Breaking BATNAS: Negotiation Lessons From Walter White. The Wall Street Journal took note here; law and pop culture seems to have gone decidedly media mainstream.



On May 11, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg presided over the competency trial of Don Quixote at Washington, D.C.’s Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall. Assisting her were her colleague Justice Stephen Breyer and Chief Judge Merrick Garland and Judge Patricia Millett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and Judge Amy Berman Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.  Tony Mauro of the Blog of Legal Times provides coverage here.

The Quixote case is the latest in a series of law and humanities-inspired moot courts, beginning in 1994, that the Bard Association of the Shakespeare Theatre Company has hosted.  More here.





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National Business Law Scholars Conference (NBLSC)

Thursday & Friday, June 4-5, 2015
Seton Hall University School of Law, Newark, NJ

This is the sixth annual meeting of the NBLSC, a conference which annually draws together legal scholars from across the United States and around the world. We welcome all scholarly submissions relating to business law. Presentations should focus on research appropriate for publication in academic journals, law reviews, and should make a contribution to the existing scholarly literature. We will attempt to provide the opportunity for everyone to actively participate. Junior scholars and those considering entering the legal academy are especially encouraged to participate.

To submit a presentation, email Professor Eric C. Chaffee at with an abstract or paper by May 8, 2015. Please title the email “NBLSC Submission – {Name}”. If you would like to attend, but not present, email Professor Chaffee with an email entitled “NBLSC Attendance.” Please specify in your email whether you are willing to serve as a commentator or moderator.

For registration and hotel information, go to

The Washington Independent Review of Books Annual Conference
The Washington Independent Review of Books Annual Conference

OUP’s Niko Pfund to Speak @ Washington Independent Review of Books’ Annual Book Festival in April

Niko Pfund

Niko Pfund

Niko Pfund is the President of Oxford University Press. If truth is a defense, it is fair to describe him as savvy, knowledgeable, creative, open-minded, and entirely likable . . . and he knows a lot about the book business, too. So it was quite a coup when the Washington Independent Review of Books got Pfund to speak at its annual book festival. (Full disclosure: I’m on the board of directors and have published a book with OUP.)

The Conference takes place on Saturday, April 25, 2015, at the Bethesda Marriott at Pook’s Hill in Bethesda, Maryland. It offers a full day of conversations and panels with professional writers, agents, and publishers, along with an opportunity for aspiring authors to present their projects to an agent during face-to-face, one-on-one pitch sessions.

Mr. Pfund will participate in a panel discussion entitled: “What Do Publishers Want?” The discussion will be moderated by Salley Shannon and will also feature Peter Osnos and Gregg Wilhelm.

→ Some 25 literary agents will be participating in the conference (see list here).

The schedule of events for the conference can be found here (click here to register for the conference).

Some of Oxford’s more recent law-related books include:


FAN 43.1 (First Amendment News) Two Upcoming Events on First Amendment & Elections

This week there will be two events in Washington, D.C. concerning elections and the First Amendment. One is on the Williams-Yule judicial elections case, and the other is on the Citizens United case.

Speaking of Citizens United, my FAN post for this Wednesday will be devoted to the case, this on the occasion of its fifth anniversary. Among other things, the post will contain comments on the case from noted First Amendment scholars and lawyers.  

Heritage to host event on judicial campaign solicitation case

Tomorrow the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C. will host an event titled “Judicial Elections and the First Amendment — Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar.” (The Williams-Yulee case will be argued tomorrow.)

The event will feature:

Hans A. von Spakovsky,  a Senior Legal Fellow at Heritage, will host and moderate the event.

Here is a description of the upcoming event:

On January 20, the U.S. Supreme Court will be hearing oral arguments in Lanell Williams-Yulee v. The Florida Bar. At issue is whether a ban on solicitation of campaign donations by judicial candidates in state elections in Florida violates the First Amendment rights of the candidates. Does Florida have a compelling interest in imposing such a ban to preserve the appearance of impartiality of its judges? Is it necessary to ensure judicial independence and maintain public confidence in the judicial system? Does this ban on solicitation violate the First Amendment rights of candidates to engage in political speech and political activity? Does the soliciting of campaign donations involve core political speech? In a post-argument briefing, two First Amendment experts who filed amicus briefs in the case, along with the former Chief Justice of the Indiana Supreme Court, will discuss these issues as well as the oral arguments conducted that morning before the Supreme Court. Moderating the panel will be a former FEC commissioner.

→ For more information, go here.


Event: Citizens United v. FEC after Five Years

This coming Wednesday the Center for Competitive Politics is sponsoring a conference on Citizens United.

LocationCato Institute


9:00 AM: The Story Behind the Lawsuit

  • Michael Boos, General Counsel, Citizens United
Interviewer: TBA

9:20 AM: The Impact on Parties in the age of Citizens United: Are changes needed?

  • Joel Gora, Professor of Law, Brooklyn Law School
  • Neil Reiff, Founding partner, Sandler Reiff Lamb Rosenstein & Birkenstock, P.C.
  • Peter J. Wallison, Arthur F. Burns Fellow, American Enterprise Institute

10:20 AM: Should liberals support Citizens United?

 Stuart Taylor, Jr.Author, freelance writer and a Brookings Institution nonresident senior fellow

  • Ira Glasser, former Executive Director, ACLU
  • Gabe Rottman, legislative counsel, ACLU
  • Wendy Kaminer, Author, lawyer, social critic and contributing editor of The Atlantic

11:20 AM: Beyond Citizens United: the future of campaign finance jurisprudence

  • Bobby R. Burchfield, Partner, McDermott Will & Emery LLP
  • Richard H. Pildes, Sudler Family Professor of Constitutional Law, New York University School of Law
  • Bradley A. Smith, Chairman and Founder, Center for Competitive Politics, Judge John T. Copenhaver Visiting Endowed Chair of Law at the West Virginia University, former FEC Chairman
  • Matea GoldThe Washington Post

FAN 35.1 (First Amendment News) — Creative Freedom & the First Amendment

On Wednesday, October 22, Freedom House and the Motion Picture Association of America, in support of Free Speech Week, will host a discussion on Creative Freedom and the First Amendment. The event will be held in Washington, D.C.


Using current on-screen examples, the discussion will focus on how movies and television shows in the United States are powerful instruments that inform and enlighten us, advancing debates on crucial social and cultural issues. The creative freedom the First Amendment protects is fundamental to the ability of storytellers to tell these stories through television and film in America.

 Free Speech Week is an annual, non-partisan national event celebrating the value of freedom of speech.

→ For more information about the Creative Freedom event, contact Ivory Zorich at

Announcing the We Robot 2015 Call for Papers

CommonsRobotHere is the We Robot call for papers, via Ryan Calo:

We Robot invites submissions for the fourth annual robotics law and policy conference—We Robot 2015—to be held in Seattle, Washington on April 10-11, 2015 at the University of Washington School of Law. We Robot has been hosted twice at the University of Miami School of Law and once at Stanford Law School. The conference web site is at

We Robot 2015 seeks contributions by academics, practitioners, and others in the form of scholarly papers or demonstrations of technology or other projects. We Robot fosters conversations between the people designing, building, and deploying robots, and the people who design or influence the legal and social structures in which robots will operate. We particularly encourage contributions resulting from interdisciplinary collaborations, such as those between legal, ethical, or policy scholars and roboticists.

This conference will build on existing scholarship that explores how the increasing sophistication and autonomous decision-making capabilities of robots and their widespread deployment everywhere from the home, to hospitals, to public spaces, to the battlefield disrupts existing legal regimes or requires rethinking of various policy issues. We are particularly interested this year in “solutions,” i.e., projects with a normative or practical thesis aimed at helping to resolve issues around contemporary and anticipated robotic applications.
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MarkelFest! at SEALS

Howard Wasserman and the team at Prawfs have organized a get-together at SEALS in memory of Dan Markel for this Saturday, and we at CoOp are honored to co-sponsor it. I’m sure this is the first of many conferences where Dan’s memory will be celebrated. Full details are here.

Conference: Critiquing Cost-Benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation

I am looking forward to attending (and briefly speaking) at a conference on May 19-20 in Washington, D.C. on “Critiquing Cost-Benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation.”

The event will take place at George Washington Law School. Co-sponsors include Center for Law, Economics and Finance (C-LEAF), the Association of Professors of Political Economy and the Law (APPEAL), Americans for Financial Reform (AFR), Better Markets, the Center for Progressive Reform (CPR) and SUNY Buffalo Law School.

Confirmed keynote speakers include John C. Coates, (author of “Cost-Benefit Analysis of Financial Regulation: Case Studies and Implications”) and law and economics professor William K. Black (whose classic book The Best Way to Rob a Bank is to Own One still influences policy debates).

Here is a link for registration, and additional details. I’ve pasted the agenda below.
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