Author: Christine Corcos


Roundup: Law and Humanities 10.20.15

A quick view of the Law and Humanities landscape, mid-October 2015.


First, we are looking forward to a couple of notable conferences next year. The Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities (ASLCH) 19th Annual Conference will take place at the University of Connecticut Law School April 1-2, 2016. This year’s conference theme is Reading Race, Writing Race, and Living Race. The deadline for submitting paper and panel proposals is extended until October 22nd. More information here at the conference website.

Another notable conference is the Law and Society Association Conference. This year LSA will hold its meeting in New Orleans from June 2-5, 2016. This year’s theme is At the Delta: Belonging, Place and Visions of Law and Social Change. The submission deadline for papers and panels has been extended to October 25. More information here at the LSA website.

In addition, AALS will have several interesting law and humanities-themed sessions.  The AALS Law and Film Committee presents as its feature film selection this year, Wednesday, January 6 at 7:30 p.m., Reversal of Fortune. This movie, based on the nonfiction account of the case by Alan Dershowitz of Harvard Law School, who represented Claus von Bulow, convicted of attempted murder of his wife Sunny, in his attempt to obtain a new trial. The film stars Jeremy Irons as von Bulow and Ron Silver as Dershowitz. On Friday, January 8, also at 7:30, the Committee presents the documentary film The Hunting Ground. This 2015 film, made by Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering, investigates the explosion of campus rape and the repeated failure of many university officials to address the problem.

The Law and Humanities Section presents its panel at 10:30, January 9. This year’s presentation is on Law and Images. The Law and Interpretation Section presents its panel on January 9 at 4:30. Its theme is the Empirics of Legal Interpretation.  The Legal History Section presents its panel at 1:30 January 9. Its theme is 800 Years of Comparative Constitutionalism: The Unique Legacy of Magna Carta.


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Roundup: Law and Humanities 07.30.15

There’s a lot going on in law and the humanities these days. Here’s a sampling.

First, an opportunity for publication:

Fairleigh Dickinson University Press invites the submission of proposals for books, monographs, or essay collections in the interdisciplinary fields of humanistically-oriented legal scholarship for the series The Fairleigh Dickinson University Press Series in Law, Culture and the Humanities.

Possible topics range from scholarship on legal history; legal theory and jurisprudence; law and critical/cultural studies, law and anthropology, law and literature, law and film, law and society, law and the performing arts, law and communication, law and philosophy, and legal hermeneutics.

Proposals must include: a description of the issue/s you intend to explore and the method/s you will use; a comparison and contrast with existing books on similar or related topics; a table of contents and a precis of what each chapter aims to cover; a description of the book’s target market/s; the author’s/authors’ or editor’s/editors’ curriculum vitae; if it is a collection of essays, a compiled and alphabetized list of short biographies of prospective contributors, and a list of three experts in the field capable of assessing the value of the project.

The series also welcomes submissions of completed monographs and essay collections; kindly make an inquiry prior to sending over the completed book or collection of essays, together with the author’s curriculum vitae and three suggested experts, if you are the author/authors. If you are an editor/editors of a completed collection of essays, please include a compiled and alphabetized list of short biographies of prospective contributors, together with your curriculum vitae and list of possible experts. Essay collections must be of previously unpublished material. Conference sessions, properly edited and often expanded by calls for papers, into essay collections, are also welcome.

Referees may or may not be from the submitted list of suggested experts. The series benefits from the advice of an international board of leading scholars in the field. Proposals may be sent to:

Caroline Joan S. Picart, Ph.D., J.D., Esquire
Tim Bower Rodriguez, P.A.
601 N. Ashley Drive, Suite 310,

Tampa, FL 33602


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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 05.20.15


The Spring 2015 issue of the New Mexico Law Review is devoted to the TV show Breaking Bad. Here’s a link to the issue’s intriguing contents, which includes such articles as Max Minzer’s Breaking Bad in the Classroom, Elizabeth N. Jones’ The Good and (Breaking) Bad of Deceptive Police Practices, and Jennifer W. Reynolds’ Breaking BATNAS: Negotiation Lessons From Walter White. The Wall Street Journal took note here; law and pop culture seems to have gone decidedly media mainstream.



On May 11, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg presided over the competency trial of Don Quixote at Washington, D.C.’s Shakespeare Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall. Assisting her were her colleague Justice Stephen Breyer and Chief Judge Merrick Garland and Judge Patricia Millett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit and Judge Amy Berman Jackson of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia.  Tony Mauro of the Blog of Legal Times provides coverage here.

The Quixote case is the latest in a series of law and humanities-inspired moot courts, beginning in 1994, that the Bard Association of the Shakespeare Theatre Company has hosted.  More here.





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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 04.16.15

New Books

New books of interest to law and humanities folks include Robert P. Burns’  Kafka’s Law: “The Trial” and American Criminal Justice (University of Chicago Press, 2014).  Here’s a description from the publisher’s website.

The Trial is actually closer to reality than fantasy as far as the client’s perception of the system. It’s supposed to be a fantastic allegory, but it’s reality. It’s very important that lawyers read it and understand this.” Justice Anthony Kennedy famously offered this assessment of the Kafkaesque character of the American criminal justice system in 1993. While Kafka’s vision of the “Law” in The Trial appears at first glance to be the antithesis of modern American legal practice, might the characteristics of this strange and arbitrary system allow us to identify features of our own system that show signs of becoming similarly nightmarish?
If you’d like to keep up on new books in the legal area, check out the New Books in Law twitter feed:

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ROUNDUP Law and Humanities 03. 03. 2015

Douglas Coulson, Assistant Professor of English at Carnegie-Mellon, is publishing a new blog in the area of law and the humanities: Nostrum remedium. Its tagline is “Miscellany on law, narrative, art, and memory.” Professor Coulson is particularly interested in legal rhetoric; his website provides links to a nice bibliography here and weblinks here.

A couple of interesting conferences are coming up this year. First:

An International Conference on Legal Argumentation and the Rule of Law is set for June 25 and 26, 2015 at the Erasmus School of Law, Rotterdam, the Netherlands. Keynote speakers are Jacco Bomhoff, London School of Economics, Damiano Canale and Giovanni Tuzet, University of Bocconi, Milan, and Matthias Klatt, University of Hamburg.  More information at the website here.


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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 01.23.15

Austin Sarat, Matthew Anderson, and Cathrine O. Frank are the editors of an excellent publication, Law and the Humanities: An Introduction (Cambridge, 2014).  Included are a valuable chapter on the origins of the discipline by the three editors, “Three tales of two texts: an introduction to law and the humanities,” by Kathryn Abrams, a section on Ideas of Justice from the biblical to the postmodern by leading scholars in the field, and other important overviews of the movement. A worthwhile purchase for those interested. Contributors include Richard Sherwin, Christine Farley, Penny Pether, Jay Mootz, Ravit Reichman, and Desmond Manderson. The hardcover is a bit pricey at a list price of $155, but the paperback is $38, and the ebook is priced at $30.

Upcoming law and humanities conferences include the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities, which holds its annual meeting this year at Georgetown University Law Centre on March 6-7. Here’s the program.  In addition, the annual meeting of the Law and Society Association will be in Seattle at the Westin Seattle, from May 28 through the 31. This year’s theme is Law’s Promise and Law’s Pathos in the Global North and the Global South.



ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 09.08.14

I’d like to alert those of you planning to attend the AALS Annual Meeting in January 2015 to three law and film events taking place during that time. The AALS Film Committee is sponsoring two law and film nights during the meeting. The first, on January 2, at 7:30 p.m. (the first night of the conference), will be a screening of the classic Judgment at Nuremberg, directed by Stanley Kramer, written by Abby Mann, and starring a whole host of great actors, including Spencer Tracy as the thoughtful Chief Judge Dan Haywood, Marlene Dietrich as widowed Mrs. Bertholt, lost in denial, a young William Shatner (in his pre Captain Kirk days), Richard Widmark as the passionate prosecutor Colonel Lawson, Burt Lancaster as Dr. Ernst Janning and Werner Klemperer, two of the German judges accused of war crimes, Judy Garland as Irene Hoffman, a witness nearly overcome by the story she has to tell, and Maximilian Schell as Hans Rolfe, the defense attorney for the judges, who challenges both the prosecutors and the system of justice at every turn. Rolfe poses the ultimate question: in such a high profile trial, in which the stakes include the future of a nation, can these defendants ever get justice? The film dramatizes some of the famous “Nuremberg Trials” held after World War II, in particular those in which judges rather than political and military figures were defendants.

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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 08.04.14

Debuting August 5 on Crackle, the streaming service, is the original half hour legal drama Sequestered, starring Jesse Bradford, Patrick Warburton and Summer Glau. It centers on the workings of a jury busy deliberating a defendant’s fate, while a young defense attorney works to find out the truth before it’s too late. One of the jurors (Glau) seems to be under some kind of threat from the outside  with regard to her verdict, a storyline that seems familiar (see, for example, The Juror (Demi Moore as the juror (1996)).

Like other legal dramas, the description for this series (all that is available at this writing) seems to suggest that what happens in the courtroom is not “truth,”  and that the jury may actually be operating as blindly as Lady Justice. I’ll be curious to see if the storyline develops in that way. Six half hour (actually 22 minute) episodes will initially be available for viewing, with an additional 6 to be released in two months. More here from the New York Times. Crackle also makes a number of other series available, including episodes of the wonderful legal series Damages starring Glenn Close and Rose Byrne, and the cult favorite The Prisoner with the incomparable Patrick McGoohan.

The Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities will hold its Eighteenth Annual Meeting at the Georgetown University Law Center, March 6-7, 2015.  Panel and paper proposals are due Wednesday, October 15th, 2014.

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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 06.30.14

Jessica Silbey (Suffolk Law School) and Megan Slack are publishing an important new piece , The Semiotics of Film in US Supreme Court Cases, in the forthcoming collection Law, Culture, and Visual Studies (Springer, 2014). It’s of interest to law and film scholars, entertainment lawyers, First Amendment scholars, and law and humanities folks generally. Here’s the abstract.

This chapter explores the treatment of film as a cultural object among varied legal subject matter in US Supreme Court jurisprudence. Film is significant as an object or industry well beyond its incarnation as popular media. Its role in law – even the highest level of US appellate law – is similarly varied and goes well beyond the subject of a copyright case (as a moving picture) or as an evidentiary proffer (as a video of a criminal confession). This chapter traces the discussion of film in US Supreme Court cases in order to map the wide-ranging and diverse ­relations of film to law – a semiotics of film in the high court’s jurisprudence – to decouple the notion of film with entertainment or visual truth. This chapter discerns the many ways in which the court perceives the role of film in legal disputes and social life. It also illuminates how the court imagines and reconstitutes through its decisions the evolving forms and significances of film and film spectatorship as an interactive public for film in society. As such, this project contributes to the work on the legal construction of social life, exploring how court cases constitute social reality through their legal discourse. It also speaks to film enthusiasts and critics who understand that film is much more than entertainment and is, in practice, a conduit of information and a mechanism for lived experience. Enmeshed in the fabric of society, film is political, commercial, expressive, violent, technologically sophisticated, economically valuable, uniquely persuasive, and, as these cases demonstrate, constantly evolving.

Download the full text from SSRN at the link.

law culture

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ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 06.11.14

The Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities (ASLCH) will be holding its 18th annual meeting at Georgetown University Law Centre March 7-8, 2015.  ASLCH will be issuing its call for papers in the next few months and abstracts will be due in the fall.  Join the ASLCH listservfollow ASLCH on Facebook, or check back here for updates. Members of the organizing committee are listed here.

If you yearn for more legal drama in your life, check out some new and returning attorneys on the small screen. TNT’s  drama Murder In the First pilot episode aired on June 9, but is available for viewing here.  Murder in the First was created by Steven Bochco, and stars Kathleen Robertson and Taye Diggs. Like Bochco’s nineties drama Murder One (ABC, 1995-1996), this show focuses on one criminal case for the entire season.  CBS is offering up Reckless, which pits a glamorous female Yankee lawyer, played by Anna Wood, against a handsome South Carolina counselor, played by Cam Gigandet. Premiere: June 29 at 9, 8 Central time. Returning for a fourth season tonight at 9 p.m., 8 Central time, are Patrick J. Adams (Mike Ross) and Gabriel Macht (Harvey Spector) in the USA character-driven show Suits.  This show started out with the premise that Spector could hide the fact that his protégé (Ross), while a whiz at law, never actually went to law school. The show has undergone something of a re-calibration: Ross is now working at an investment firm. Still, the two are in contact. We’ll see how this relationship plays out. (Here, star Patrick J. Adams attempts to explain why this series about a fake lawyer seems so popular for real lawyers). The Suits webpage provides a quiz for you to determine “what kind of a lawyer [you would] be.” It’s career advice in good fun.

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