Finance’s Failures: Lack of Accountability

This week I’ll be highlighting some excellent, recent articles on problems in the US financial sector.  First up is Jennifer Taub’s Reforming the Banks for Good.  On the way to introducing six valuable reforms, Taub notes the following:

 In 2013 JPMorgan Chase (the bank that bought WaMu) agreed to pay $13 billion to the U.S. government related in part to the sale of bad mortgages to government-sponsored housing enterprises Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The settlement was heralded by the government as the largest ever with a single institution in U.S. history. But the board of directors at JPMorgan Chase awarded CEO Jamie Dimon a 74 percent pay increase (to $20 million) that same year. Dennis Kelleher, president of Better Markets, called this move “as shocking as it is indefensible,” noting, “It’s a real slap in the face to the [Department of Justice] and financial regulators who think that the actions that they’ve taken in the last year have been appropriate to punish and deter JPMorgan Chase.” It is hard not to conclude that those who helped create a global financial calamity have not and will not suffer personal consequences.

I’m looking forward to reading Brandon Garrett’s Too Big to Jail this fall to explore some systemic responses to the problem. If it’s not solved, fines simply become a cost of doing business. And for too big to fail banks, no mere fine can deter bad conduct. If any particular penalty really endangered a bank, it would just be funneled back to the bank in the form of a bailout.

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