ROUNDUP: Law and Humanities 04.01.14

Welcome to the first Law and Humanities ROUNDUP post. Here are some items I hope you will find of interest.

LSA

The Law and Society Association (LSA) Meeting, one of the most important conferences in the area of Law and Humanities, takes place May 29-June 1 in friendly Minneapolis, Minnesota. This year’s theme centers on the role of law and legal institutions in sustaining, creating, interrogating, and ameliorating inequalities. The 2014 Program invites participants to explore and consider three questions:

  • How can Law and Society scholarship contribute to unearthing and understanding inequalities?
  • How can Law and Society scholarship contribute to the critical interrogation of discourses of equality and inequality and help to reveal what is at stake in these concepts?
  • What impact can we expect these scholarly contributions to have on the persistence of these inequalities and on public discourse about them?

You can check out the preliminary program, register, and find hotel information here. Early registration ends April 15 (with 50 percent refunds available through that date. You cannot obtain any refunds after April 15).

If  you have always thought about writing legal fiction, check out this announcement from Alafair Burke at Hofstra Law.  Professor Burke, who writes the Ellie Hatcher novels, along with two other best-selling lawyer authors, Lee Child (who writes the Jack Reacher thrillers) and Marcia Clark (author of the Rachel Knight series) will be judges of a crime fiction competition being offered by Hofstra Law and Mulholland Books. The rules are simple, and include this one: Your story must feature a lawyer as a main character. Read the rest of the rules here. Deadline for entries is May 1, 2014.

UCLA English professor Eric Jager has published another interesting title: Blood Royal: A True Tale of Crime and Detection in Medieval Paris (Little, Brown), available in hardcover, audio, and ebook formats.  Here’s the description of the book from the publisher’s website.

A riveting true story of murder and detection in 15th-century Paris, by one of the most brilliant medievalists of his generation. On a chilly November night in 1407, Louis of Orleans was murdered by a band of masked men. The crime stunned and paralyzed France since Louis had often ruled in place of his brother King Charles, who had gone mad. As panic seized Paris, an investigation began. In charge was the Provost of Paris, Guillaume de Tignonville, the city’s chief law enforcement officer–and one of history’s first detectives. As de Tignonville began to investigate, he realized that his hunt for the truth was much more dangerous than he ever could have imagined. A rich portrait of a distant world, BLOOD ROYAL is a gripping story of conspiracy, crime and an increasingly desperate hunt for the truth. And in Guillaume de Tignonville, we have an unforgettable detective for the ages, a classic gumshoe for a cobblestoned era.

Dr. Jager’s previous book, The Last Duel, about trial by combat in medieval France, (in this case, over whether a noblewoman’s claim that she had been raped was true), was nominated for the Crime Writers’ Association Gold Dagger Award and adapted for a BBC documentary in 2008.

 

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