Introducing Christine Corcos

Corcos 01I’m very pleased to announce that Professor Christine Corcos will be keeping us updated regularly about Law & Humanities as well as Media Law.

Christine is the Richard C. Cadwallader Associate Professor of Law at the Louisiana State University Law Center and a member of the Women’s and Gender Studies Faculty at Louisiana State University A&M. She is the co-author of La Politique du Logement aux Etats-Unis (1999), the author of An International Guide to Law and Literature Studies (Hein, 2000) and editor of Law and Magic: A Collection of Essays (Carolina Academic Press 2010). She has written numerous law review articles and essays including George Carlin, Constitutional Law Scholar, and Visits to a Small Planet: Rights Talk in Some Science Fiction Film and Television Series From the 1950s to the 1990s, for the Stetson Law Review, Some Thoughts on Chuck Lorre, “Bad Words,” and the “Raging Paranoia of Our Network Censors,” in the Regent Law Review, From Agnatic Succession to Absolute Primogeniture: The Shift to Equal Rights of Succession to Thrones and Titles in the Modern European Constitutional Monarchy, for the Michigan State Law Review, an essay on the tv show Damages for the collection Lawyers in Your Living Room (ABA, 2009), Prosecutors and Psychics on the Air: Does a “Psychic Detective Effect” Exist for the collection Law and Justice on the Small Screen (Hart Publishing, 2012), and Magical Images in Law for the collection Explorations in Courtroom Discourse (Ashgate, 2011). She is currently doing some writing in the area of law and religion, particularly on the First Amendment, Spiritualism, and “crafty sciences.”

She is a co-author of several casebooks, including Theater Law (Carolina Academic Press, 2004), Law and Popular Culture (2d ed., LEXIS Publishing, 2012), and Law of the European Union: A New Constitutional Order (2d ed., Carolina Academic Press, 2013). She is Secretary/Treasurer of the Law and Humanities Institute and a member of the Board of Editors of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law. She also blogs at Media Law Prof Blog, the Law and Magic Blog, the Law and Humanities Blog (for the Law and Humanities Institute) and Feminist Law Professors.

She speaks frequently to the media on media law and law and popular culture.

Areas of interest: First Amendment, Freedom of Expression, Law and Religion, Legal History (including Women’s Legal History), Law and Popular Culture

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1 Response

  1. Law & Humanities are indeed very grave items. We have to take the knowledge from Professor Christine Corcos. She is excellent teacher and qualified lawyer.