FAN.1 (First Amendment News)

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From time to time, I will post some First Amendment news items that might otherwise escape the attention of free expression enthusiasts.  It may be about a controversy or brief or new book or article or conference or what have you.  If you wish to send along your own newsworthy item for consideration, drop my an e-mail.  With that, here is my first dollop of news:

  • On February 15th the Harvard Law Review will host a conference on “Freedom of the Press” in celebration of the 50th anniversary of New York Times Co. v. Sullivan.  Participants include: Mark Tushnet (Harvard), Stuart Benjamin (Duke), Sonja R. West (U. Ga.), RonNell Andersen Jones (BYU), David Anderson (U. TX), Marvin Ammori (New America Foundation), Marjorie Heins (Free Expression Policy Project), Jonathan Zittrain (Harvard), Rebecca Tushnet (Georgetown), Caroline Corbin (U. Miami), Jack Balkin (Yale), Yochai Benkler (Harvard), and Dawn Nunziato (GWU).
  • Speaking of NYT v. Sullivan, Lee Levine (a noted First Amendment media lawyer) and Steve Wermiel (a professor at American University Law School) have just published The Progeny: Justice William Brennan’s Fight to Save New York Times v. Sullivan (American Bar Association, 2014). Check out my SCOTUSblog interview with the authors.
  • Recently, the Minnesota Law Review published a thought-proving article titled “Speech Engines” by James Grimmelmann (U. MD Law).  It is one of the best pieces of scholarship I have seen concerning the regulatory debates over just how the law – of copyright, trademark, defamation, privacy and of the First Amendment – should treat Google’s search engines.
  • Gabriel Schoenfeld, writing in the Weekly Standard, just reviewed Floyd Abrams’ latest book, Friend of the Court: On the Front Lines with the First Amendment (Yale University Press, 2013).  (For Mr. Abrams’ views on McCullen v. Coakley (the Mass. abortion-protest case now before the Court), see  Jonathan H. Adler’s post over at the Volokh Conspiracy.)
  • This June Yale Law School Dean Robert Post will release his latest book, Citizens Divided: Campaign Finance Reform and the Constitution (Harvard University Press, 234 pp., $25.00).  The book is an outgrowth of Post’s 2013 Tanner Lectures at Harvard.  Here is a little excerpt from the publisher’s blurb: “Defenders of the First Amendment greeted the ruling with enthusiasm, while advocates of electoral reform recoiled in disbelief. Robert Post offers a new constitutional theory that seeks to reconcile these sharply divided camps.” Post’s text is followed by commentaries by Pamela S. Karlan, Lawrence Lessig, Frank I. Michelman, and Nadia Urbinati.

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