Some Brilliant Thoughts on Social Media

The LSE has a consistently illuminating podcast series, but Nick Couldry’s recent lecture really raised the bar. He seamlessly integrates cutting edge media theory into a comprehensive critique of social media’s role in shaping events for us. I was also happy to hear him praise the work of two American scholars I particularly admire: former Co-Op guest blogger Joseph Turow (whose Daily You was described as one of the most influential books of the past decade in media studies), and Julie Cohen (whose Configuring the Networked Self was featured in a symposium here).

I plan on posting some excerpts if I can find a transcript, or a published version of the talk. In the meantime, some more brilliant thoughts on social media, this time from Ian Bogost:

For those of us lucky enough to be employed, we’re really hyperemployed—committed to our usual jobs and many other jobs as well. . . . Hyperemployment offers a subtly different way to characterize all the tiny effort we contribute to Facebook and Instagram and the like. It’s not just that we’ve been duped into contributing free value to technology companies (although that’s also true), but that we’ve tacitly agreed to work unpaid jobs for all these companies. . . . We do tiny bits of work for Google, for Tumblr, for Twitter, all day and every day.

Today, everyone’s a hustler. But now we’re not even just hustling for ourselves or our bosses, but for so many other, unseen bosses. For accounts payable and for marketing; for the Girl Scouts and the Youth Choir; for Facebook and for Google; for our friends via their Kickstarters and their Etsy shops; for Twitter, which just converted years of tiny, aggregated work acts into $78 of fungible value per user.

And perhaps also for the NSA. As participants in 2011’s Digital Labor conference gear up for a reprise, I’m sure we’ll be discussing these ideas.

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