More on Writing and Why Clear Writing Matters

Lawyers must write. Academics must also write. Gandhi built a newspaper to get his ideas to the people. Again, writing is important. And good writing is even more important if the writing is about, or flirts with, politics. I have noted my love of Orwell’s Politics and the English Language. A main point is that when one writes in simple, clear sentences, one cannot lie. Lies are quickly revealed. I came across this passage from Hemingway and noticed a similar sentiment. Like Orwell, Hemingway explains why poor writing can work for a time, but is not good writing:

This too to remember. If a man writes clearly enough any one can see if he fakes. If he mystifies to avoid a straight statement, which is very different from breaking so-called rules of syntax or grammar to make an effect which can be obtained in no other way, the writer takes a longer time to be known as a fake and other writers who are afflicted by the same necessity will praise him in their own defense. True mysticism should not be confused with incompetence in writing which seeks to mystify where there is no mystery but is really only the necessity to fake to cover lack of knowledge or the inability to state clearly. Mysticism implies a mystery and there are many mysteries; but incompetence is not one of them; nor is overwritten journalism made literature by the injection of a false epic quality. Remember this too: all bad writers are in love with the epic. Death in the Afternoon, p. 54; (2002-07-25). Ernest Hemingway on Writing (No Series) (Kindle Locations 848-854). Scribner. Kindle Edition.

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4 Responses

  1. Hemingway could have used a refresher course in how to use a comma.

  2. Joe says:

    “A main point is that when one writes in simple, clear sentences, one cannot lie.”

    That’s a bit exaggerated. It must be particularly hard for lawyers and law professors to follow.

  3. David Glenn says:

    I read an article that says,” A scrupulous writer, in every sentence that he writes, will ask himself at least four questions, thus: What am I trying to say? What words will express it? What image or idiom will make it clearer? Is this image fresh enough to have an effect? And he will probably ask himself two more: Could I put it more shortly? Have I said anything that is avoidably ugly?”

    I hope regardless of profession, would consider asking these questions first.

  4. AGR says:

    @KJH–That is why God invented copy editors…