Epstein, Landes, & Posner Find SCOTUS Very Pro-Business

Adam Liptak’s story on the Supreme Court offers a nice empirical validation of Jeffrey Rosen’s observation in Supreme Court, Inc.: this is a very pro-business SCOTUS.

Whether the Roberts court is unusually friendly to business has been the subject of repeated discussion, much of it based on anecdotes and studies based on small slices of empirical evidence. The new study, by contrast, takes a careful and comprehensive look at some 2,000 decisions from 1946 to 2011.

Published last month in the Minnesota Law Review, [a study by Lee Epstein, William Landes, & Richard Posner] ranked the 36 justices who served on the court over those 65 years by the proportion of their pro-business votes; all five of the current court’s more conservative members were in the top 10. But the study’s most striking finding was that the two justices most likely to vote in favor of business interests since 1946 are the most recent conservative additions to the court, Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., both appointed by President George W. Bush.

The ideological shift on the Court is also affecting the academy. If a scholar aims to influence the Court, he or she would be smart to find some new interpretation of an old right that dramatically expands corporate power. To the extent influence on the Court is taken as a bellwether of the quality of one’s legal scholarship, perhaps that ostensibly neutral evaluative mechanism is promoting the political commitments of a durable conservative majority.

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