Exponential Hacks

As All Things Digital Kara Swisher reports, Living Social experienced a significant hack the other day: over 50 million users’ email, dates of birth, and encrypted passwords were leaked into the hands of Russian hackers (or so it seems). This hack comes on the heels of data breaches at LinkedIn and Zappos. That the passwords were encrypted just means that users better change their passwords and fast because in time the encryption can be broken. A few years ago, I blogged about the 500 million mark of personal data leaked. Hundreds of millions seems like child’s play today.

This raises some important questions about what we mean when we talk about personally identifiable information (PII). Paul Schwartz and my co-blogger Dan Solove have done terrific work helping legislators devise meaningful definitions of PII in a world of reidentification. Paul Ohm is currently working on an important project providing a coherent account of sensitive information in the context of current data protection laws. Is someone’s password and date of birth sensitive information deserving special privacy protection? Beyond the obvious health, credit, and financial information, what other sorts of data do we consider sensitive and why? Answers to these questions are crucial to companies formulating best practices, the FTC as  it continues its robust enforcement of privacy promises and pursuing deceptive practices, and legislators considering private sector privacy regulations of data brokers, as in Senator John Rockefeller’s current efforts.

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1 Response

  1. PrometheeFeu says:

    The passwords were hashed and salted. Unless they used a very bad hash function, they are probably safe for a very long time.