The Yale Law Journal Online: Service Delivery, Resource Allocation, and Access to Justice

The Yale Law Journal Online has just published Service Delivery, Resource Allocation, and Access to Justice: Greiner and Pattanayak and the Research Imperative, an essay by Jeffrey Selbin, Jeanne Charn, Anthony Alfieri & Stephen Wizner. In their essay, the authors respond to D. James Greiner & Cassandra Wolos Pattanayak, Randomized Evaluation in Legal Assistance: What Difference Does Representation (Offer and Actual Use) Make?, 121 YALE L.J. 2118 (2012), a provocative empirical study concerning the effect of providing legal assistance to low-income clients. These clinical teachers encourage the public interest legal community to take seriously Greiner and Pattanayak’s finding that, in certain kinds of proceedings relating to social welfare benefits, people without lawyers may do just as well or better than people who receive an offer of representation from a well-regarded legal services practice. They provide an “optimistic reading” of the Greiner and Pattanayak study and argue that empirical research “can inform service delivery, resource allocation, and access-to-justice questions.” The authors then discuss recent developments that provide incentives for such research and call for legal services lawyers and clinical law professors to “embrace an expansive, empirical research agenda.”

Preferred citation: Jeffrey Selbin, Jeanne Charn, Anthony Alfieri & Stephen Wizner, Service Delivery, Resource Allocation, and Access to Justice: Greiner and Pattanayak and the Research Imperative, 122 YALE L.J. ONLINE 45 (2012), http://yalelawjournal.org/2012/07/30/selbin-charn-alfieri&wizner.html.

 

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