Top Ten Lists

Building off that my last post, and engaging in the very temptation to look at school specific outcomes that I earlier resisted, here are a series of top-10 lists for various law school employment outcomes.  Each list is calculated by dividing the relevant category for each school by the total graduates of that school in 2011.  (I think that dividing the category by employed graduates is likely to be misleading.)  I eliminated schools with incomplete data.

Most Likely To Graduate and Lose Your Soul in a Super-Large (500+) Large Firm

  1. Cornell (60%)
  2. Columbia (59%)
  3. Chicago (52%)
  4. Penn (50%)
  5. Harvard (49%)
  6. NYU (48%)
  7. Stanford (44%)
  8. Berkeley (41%)
  9. Northwestern (40%)
  10. UVA (38%)

Most Likely to Graduate and Lose Your Soul in a Solo Practice

  1. Texas Southern (18%)
  2. Charlotte (11%)
  3. Faulkner (10%)
  4. St. Mary’s (11%)
  5. Williamette (11%)
  6. South Texas (11%)
  7. Florida A&M (10%)
  8. John Marshall (10%)
  9. Cooley (9% – but an astonishing 62 graduates!)
  10. Southern (9%)

Most Depressed Students, or Most Savvy Data Collectors [Highest Percent of Students Reporting They No Longer Are Seeking Employment]

  1. Santa Clara (18%)
  2. Chapman (15%)
  3. Texas Southern (12%)
  4. Williamette (12%)
  5. Colorado (10%)
  6. Pace (9%)
  7. Idaho (9%
  8. Widener-Harrisburg (8%)
  9. McGeorge (8%)
  10. Roger Williams (8%)

Over-Achievers? [Highest Percent of Students Reporting That They were Seeking Advanced Degrees]

  1. Vermont (11%)
  2. U.Florida (11%)
  3. Montana (10%)
  4. Mississippi (10%)
  5. Wake (8%)
  6. Arkansas – Fayetteville (8%)
  7. South Dakota (8%)
  8. Roger Williams (8%)
  9. Wash U (7%)
  10. Charleston (6%)

Best Law School for Business Majors [Highest Percent of Students Reported to Be Working in Business or Industry]

  1. South Dakota (168% – yes, I think they are probably somehow filling in the bubbles wrong)
  2. Montana (134% – again, seems unlikely that they have 109 folks employed in busines and industry with only 77 reported graduates)
  3. Arkansas – Fayetteville (70% – Walmart?)
  4. District of Columbia (57%)
  5. Elon (52%)
  6. Arkansas- Little Rock (52%)
  7. Campbell (49%)
  8. Missouri (49%)
  9. Widener – Harrisburg (44%)
  10. Vermont (44%)

Very Honest Law School Administrators [Highest Percent of Students Reported to Be Still Seeking Employment]

  1. La Verne (30%)
  2. Appalachian (30%)
  3. Ave Maria (29%)
  4. Missouri-Kansas City (28%)
  5. Barry (25%)
  6. Western State (25%)
  7. Valparaiso (25%)
  8. Florida A&M (20%)
  9. St. Thomas (20%)
  10. Wyoming (18%)

Most Likely to Agree that Law Students Can Be Very Tricky To Get Ahold Of [Highest Percent of Students Whose Employment Status is Said to be Unknown]

  1. Puerto Rico (62%)
  2. North Carolina Central (26%)
  3. Capital (21%)
  4. Thomas Jefferson(19%)
  5. Texas Wesleyan (17%)
  6. Cooley(17%)
  7. Appalachian (16%)
  8. Ohio Northern (15%)
  9. Liberty (14%)
  10. District of Columbia (14%)

Most Anxious Career Services Offices [Reports The Number of Graduating Students (Employed %)]

  1. Cooley 927 (63%)
  2. Georgetown 647 (96%)
  3. Harvard 589 (95%)
  4. George Washington 512 (95%)
  5. NYU 497 (97%)
  6. Fordham 491 (94%)
  7. Suffolk 487 (81%)
  8. New York Law School 481 (85%)
  9. American 464 (84%)
  10. Brooklyn 463 (81%)

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4 Responses

  1. Adam says:

    I think Yale probably ends up in the top ten of the first list once you account for clerkships.

  2. Matt says:

    I’d be (mildly) curious to know what percentage of Florida students in your “over-achiever” list are working on LLMs at Florida’s own excellent Tax LLM program. (None of the others on the list strike me as obvious cases for that sort of thing, but it seems plausible for Florida, at least.)

  3. Dave Hoffman says:

    Adam,
    I’m not sure what accounting for clerkships would mean – we could remove them from the denominator, or we could ask “where do people end up after the clerkship”? The former method would produce a different set of answers, but I’m not sure why it makes sense. The latter goes beyond this data.

    Matt – I think it’s an interesting question. It’s not, unfortunately, knowable from this data.

  4. I guess there is alot of soul searching to be done at Cornell.