The Front Page, for Whom?

Recently, Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post, announced the debut of its French version and new editor, Anne Sinclair, a journalist and former television anchor who many know as the wife of Dominique Strauss-Kahn.  In discussing her role at Le HuffPo, she explained that her husband’s legal troubles and political career would not pose a conflict of interest for her work and that “All important news will be treated normally, as it would be treated elsewhere.  Anything that should be on the front page will be on the front page.”   What caught my interest wasn’t her assurance about her professionalism.  Rather, it was her suggestion that a front page exists for online papers, at least one that is static.  In our era of personalization, news sites not only personalize the ads that we see but also news deemed of interest to us — and hence what site visitors see as they open new sites.  Lucky for us, guest blogger Joseph Turow can shed light on the varied implications of such personalization — on our culture, politics, privacy, and more.

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