Some more resources on the Cloud

Right then. My plea for sharing good work on the cloud has failed. I did what professor/nerd types do. I researched a bit more. So I now taunt you with more sharing by me. Christopher Yoo appears to be diving into Ambrosia (as I like to call the cloud). His paper, Cloud Computing: Architectural and Policy Implications can serve as another way into cloud ideas and literature.

Oh and I love the fact that the paper has a references section. They are below fold with links where possible (I inserted from the list where provided and added some of my own. So errors etc., are mine; not Christopher’s). In other words, thanks Christoper and that whole research, cite culture thing. It worked and gave me more on which to chew.

Birman, K., Chockler, G., & van Renesse, R. (2008). Towards a cloud computing research agenda

Brodkin, J. (2010, June 10). Amazon cloud uses FedEx instead of the Internet to ship data, Network World.

Buyya, R., Yeo, C., Venugopal, S., Broberg, J., & Brandic, I. (2009). Cloud computing and emerging IT platforms: Vision, hype, and reality for delivering computing as the 5th utility. Future Generation Computer Systems, 25, 599–616. NOTE: As is proper, there was not a link in the original citation list. I offer this link which I believe is the same substance but no one should assume it is what Christopher was reading.

Carr, N. (2008). The big switch. (New York: W.W. Norton). Here is a link to the books page which will let buy it from a range of sellers.

Foster, I., Zhao, Y., Raicu, I., & Lu, S. (2008). Cloud computing and grid computing 360-degree compared. (In Proceedings grid computing environments workshop: GCE 2008 (pp. 1–10)). DOI 10.1109/GCE.2008.4738445. NOTE: As is proper, there was not a link in the original citation list. I offer this link which I believe is the same substance but no one should assume it is what Christopher was reading

Geelan, J. (2009, January 24). Twenty one experts define cloud computing. Cloud Computing Journal.

Johnson, B. (2008, September 29). Cloud computing is a trap, warns GNU founder Richard Stallman. guardian.co.uk.

Mell, P. & Grance, T. (2009, October 7). The NIST definition of cloud computing (version 15). NOTE the link is as given in Christopher’s paper. It seems dead. I offer this link which I believe is the same substance but no one should assume it is what Christopher was reading.

Schmalensee, R. (1984). Gaussian demand and commodity pricing. Journal of Business, 57, S211-S230.

Vaquero, L., Rodero-Merino, L. Caceres, J, Lindner, M. (2009). A break in the clouds: Toward a cloud definition. ACM SIGCOMM Computer Communication Review, 39, 50–55. NOTE: As is proper, there was not a link in the original citation list. I offer this link which I believe takes one to the same substance but no one should assume it is what Christopher was reading.

Weinhardt, C., Anandasivam, A., Blau, & Stösser, J. (2009, March/April). Business models in the service world. IT Pro, 28–33.

Weinman, J. (2008, September 7). The 10 Laws of Cloudonomics. GigaOm, .

Weinman, J. (2009, November 30). Mathematical proof of the inevitability of cloud computing.

Weinman, J. (2011a, February 27). Smooth operator: The value of demand aggregation.

Weinman, J. (2011b, April 12). As time goes by: The law of cloud response time.

Yoo, C. (2010). Innovations in the Internet’s architecture that challenge the status quo. Journal on Telecommunications and High Technology Law, 8, 79–99.

Yoo, C. (2010). The changing patterns of Internet usage. Federal Communications Law Journal, 63, 67–89.

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2 Responses

  1. A.J. Sutter says:

    Not diving into Ambrosia so much as drinking the Kool-Aid — or, at least this reader gets the feeling, pushing it. Yoo’s overly sunny evaluation isn’t at all a serious examination of the pros and cons of the cloud. Data privacy and security aren’t the only issues pertinent to individuals, but also, e.g. the increasing move to an access-based model. I for one really resent having every activity in my life being sliced and monetized by someone else. Richard Stallman makes a similar point in the Johnson article Yoo and you cite; but Yoo only refers to him as a “leading skeptic” in a footnote, which is hung so as to make it appear that Stallman’s objection is simply that the cloud isn’t new technology. Another issue that falls within the article’s stated scope of “policy implications” but that is ignored is whether those who prefer to resist the cloud will be able to do so, or whether market forces and “network effects” will force us to be Borg-ified. A very superficial and disingenuous piece.

  2. Ionut Pop says:

    You said it very good, Sutter, it really is a very superficial and disingenuous piece!

    Burden’s waterwheel changed industry, Electricity changed the world, computing changed it again, then the Internet blew open the doors and dramatic change is about us all over again. That’s the essence of the book.

    It may sound a bit obvious, but actually the stories about Burden, Edison, Betclic, Insull and beyond that carry the narrative are interesting and bring the whole thing alive with the kind of nuggets that win pub quizzes.