2010, The Year in Scholarship

Legal scholarship had so many highlights in 2010.  New articles and books seriously enriched discussions over the course of the year.  Listing them all would of course be an impossible task, but my favorites include Jack M. Balkin’s The Reconstruction Power, Ann Bartow’s A Portrait of the Internet as a Young Man, Joseph Blocher’s Government Viewpoint and Government Speech, M. Ryan Calo’s The Boundaries of Privacy Harm, Jeanne Fromer’s Patentography, James Grimmelmann’s Privacy as Product Safety, Sonia Katyal’s The Dissident Citizen and Property Outlaws: How Squatters, Pirates, and Protestors Improve the Law of Ownership (with Eduardo M. Peñalver), Deborah Hellman’s Money Talks But It Isn’t Speech, Orly Lobel’s The Incentives Matrix: The Comparative Effectiveness of Rewards, Liabilities, Duties and Protections for Reporting Illegality, Michael Madison, Brett Frischmann and Katharine Strandburg’s Constructing Commons in the Cultural Environment, Jon Michaels’s Privatization’s Pretensions, Helen Norton’s The Supreme Court’s Post-Racial Turn Towards a Zero-Sum Understanding of Equality, Martha Nussbaum’s From Disgust to Humanity: Sexual Orientation and Constitutional Law, Paul Ohm’s Broken Promises of Anonymity: Responding to the The Surprising Failure of Anonymization, Frank Pasquale’s Beyond Innovation and Competition: The Need for Qualified Transparency in Internet Intermediaries, Scott Peppet’s Unraveling Privacy: The Personal Prospectus and the Threat of a Full Disclosure Future, Neil Richards’s The Puzzle of Brandeis, Privacy, and Speech (see here as well), Daniel Solove’s Fourth Amendment Pragmatism, Barbara van Schewick’s Internet Architecture and Innovation, David Super’s Against Flexibility, Eugene Volokh’s Freedom of Speech and the Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress Tort, and Jeremy Waldron’s Dignity and Defamation: The Visibility of Hate.

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