Not to be Missed Panels at AALS

There are many reasons to go to the AALS Annual Meeting next week but here are two more.  The Section on Women in Legal Education has organized two stellar panels that are sure to be informative and engaging.  Concurring Opinions blogger, Danielle Citron, is one of the panelists on the First Amendment Meets Cyber-Stalking Meets Character and Fitness panel.   See  below for details on both panels.

 

Saturday, Jan. 9, 8:30–10:15 a.m.:  The First Amendment Meets Cyber-Stalking Meets Character and Fitness

Cyber-stalking and cyber-harassment have made their way to the legal academy.  Some scholars say that on-line attacks constitute protected free speech.  Other scholars say that this conduct is tortious and raises serious equality and civil rights concerns since internet stalking is often directed at women and minorities.  But what about the character and fitness requirements that law students sitting for the bar must satisfy?  Do law students who engage in harassment, smearing, and other such conduct (on Facebook, blogs, “Above the Law,” etc.) raise fitness and professionalism issues?  Is there a problem with law students using websites to make outrageous gender- or race-specific comments (often about other students or faculty members)?  (See http://lawvibe.com/the-autoadmit-scandal-xoxoth/)  Is this conduct beyond question as free speech or does this conduct raise character and fitness issues that law schools must address?  Does the fact that it is technologically difficult to identify all posters impact the calculus?

Panelists: 

Deborah L. Rhode, Stanford Law School

Jack M. Balkin, Yale Law School

Brad Wendel, Cornell University School of Law

Danielle Citron, University of Maryland School of Law

Moderator:  Elizabeth Nowicki, Boston Univ. School of Law & Chair, AALS Section on Women in Legal Education

 

Sunday, Jan. 10, 9-10:45 a.m.:  Succeeding in Legal Education

According to a 2007-2008 AALS report, women comprised 61.3% of all law school lecturers and 53.9% of law school assistant professors, yet only 29.3% of all full professors and 19.8% of all law school deans.  To that end, this panel will focus on practical strategies for succeeding in legal education.  Topics will include becoming a dean, excelling at scholarship, creating a meaningful media presence, achieving leadership positions in legal organizations, and making a lateral move.

Panelists:

Phoebe A. Haddon, Dean, University of Maryland, School of Law

Okianer Christian Dark, Associate Dean and Professor of Law, Howard University, School of Law

Dorothy A. Brown, Professor of Law, Emory Law School

Nancy B. Rapoport, Gordon Silver Professor of Law, Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, School of Law

Moderator:  Elizabeth Nowicki, Boston Univ. School of Law & Chair, AALS Section on Women in Legal Education

You may also like...