Seeing With Your Tongue: No Really

Not much law here, yet. Researchers have taken theoretical work begun decades ago and developed a “brain port,” a device that uses technology to allow people to reorganize how they process sensory data. In the example below, blind people are able to see images. The device takes visual input, processes it, sends impulses to a pad that sits on someone’s tongue, and then the person is able to see some images. It takes quite a bit of training and in some cases folks have been able to use the device such that they actually re-train the brain and can reduce use of the device. Yes in a sense they have “rewired” their brain. This advance is just cool. The video also explains that the advances in this field trace to Professor Paul Bach-y-Rita who apparently had to overcome a fair amount of resistance in his fields of neurobiology and rehabilitation, because he was challenging many accepted beliefs regarding the way the brain works and more (all hail Kuhn). Will the law become involved in this area? It probably already is insofar as patents and copyright are being used to govern the technology. In addition, as I have noted before, the advances in embedded or sensory enhancing devices raise numerous questions regarding privacy, the ownership of data, bioethics, and research ethics. So welcome to the future and take a look at the video. It really is amazing and wonderful that scientists have made these breakthroughs. At the very least, anyone questioning how basic research can lead to unforeseen benefits should pause after seeing this work.

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