CBGB’s Post Script: Not So Punk

120px-CBGB_club_facade.jpgThe iconic music club CBGB & OMFUG (aka CB’s) opened its doors in 1973, featuring acts like Patti Smith Group, Television, The Ramones, Talking Heads, The Dictators, and Blondie. Although initially intending to showcase a variety of music (hence the full name “Country Blue Grass Blues and Other Music For Uplifting Gormandizers”), founder Hilly Kristal ended up nurturing America’s punk scene. During the 1980s, hardcore bands such as Reagan Youth, Muphy’s Law, and Agnostic Front appeared during Sunday matinees, often called “thrash days.” At CB’s, the bathrooms had no doors; fliers papered the walls. After a thirty-three year run, the club closed in October 2006. Patti Smith appeared in a final concert to bid the club adieu.

Although now gone, the club remains legendary, the memory of rebellion, stale beer, and cigarettes firmly stuck in many’s minds. This Tuesday, fans and celebrities like Stevie Van Zandt and The Dictator’s Handsome Dick Manitoba came to the opening of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Annex NYC to see an exhibit of CBGB artifacts, including the club’s tattered awning, cash register, and flier-covered phone booth.

But the club’s past does not resemble the present wranglings over its legacy. When club founder Hilly Kristal died last year, he left the majority of his estate (worth millions due to the popularity of CBGB tee-shirts) to his daughter, leaving his son and ex-wife disappointed and ready to challenge the will. In a suit filed in Surrogate’s Court in Manhattan, Mr. Kristal’s former wife (and mother of his children) claims that she is the rightful owner of the business and that Mr. Kristal and their daughter deceived her by hiding the money from the sale of the CBGB merchandise. As Karen Kristal (the founder’s ex-wife) explained to The New York Times, “I put up the money, spent my time in there. And then my daughter says that they get it all. And that’s a lie.” Longtime members of the CBGB community shake their heads at the ugliness of the dispute but insist that CBGB’s symbolic place as the birthplace of punk rock will remain undisturbed. The Ramones’ artistic director Arturo Vega offers that the lawsuit “shouldn’t reflect what this place was about . . . . CBGB was a beacon of freedom for young people, something to believe in.” Indeed.

You may also like...