Total Law Professor JD Applicant Statistics: 1997-2007

I’ve been posting data about law professor applicants (see here and here), and I thought I’d share some more data that I have that AALS provided me with. Here is data about the schools with the most applicants from 1997-2007. During 1997-2007, there were 8675 applicants with JDs from US law schools. This is not the total number of applicants, as the statistic does not include applicants without JDs and from foreign law schools. The average number of applicants with JDs from US law schools from 1997-2007 is 789 per year.

The table below has more information.

LAW SCHOOL TOTAL JD APPLICANTS 1997-2007 AVERAGE JD APPLICANTS PER YEAR % OF TOTAL JD APPLICANTS FROM US LAW SCHOOLS
Harvard 675 61 8%
Yale 435 40 5%
Georgetown 376 34 4%
Columbia 307 28 4%
Michigan 271 25 3%
NYU 262 24 3%
Virginia 253 23 3%
Berkeley 228 21 3%
Chicago 190 17 2%
Stanford 176 16 2%
Penn 167 15 2%
Duke 148 13 2%
Texas 134 12 2%
Cornell 122 11 1%
GW 122 11 1%
Northwestern 114 10 1%
Boston U 112 10 1%
American 109 10 1%
Tulane 104 9 1%
Florida 91 8 1%

The 20 schools above comprise 4397 of the 8675 applicants from 1997-2007 — about 51% of all the applicants. An additional 164 schools comprise the remaining 49%.

The first 10 schools above comprise 37% of all applicants. The first 4 schools above — Harvard, Yale, Georgetown, and Columbia — comprise 21% of all applicants.

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4 Responses

  1. Ross Cheit says:

    Thanks for the data. Very interesting. Are there any data on the prevalance of PhDs in this group? I’m interested in the extent to which the percentage of dual-degree holders has increased over time. Thanks.

  2. Joe says:

    This is interesting, but what’s more interesting is who gets the job. I bet the numbers come out very different under that analysis.

  3. Nick says:

    Any chance of posting the other schools? Inquiring minds want to know.

  4. John says:

    Joe, the links to previous posts show the rate of acceptance for applicants with degrees from particular schools.