And Now a Word From Our Sponsors…: The Ethics of Sponsored Courses and Maybe Chairs?

dollars2.jpgInside Higher Ed details that Hunter College offered a course that was sponsored by an industry group called International Anticounterfeiting Coalition (known as the IACC). The group represents major fashion industry companies. The class well that is where the fun begins. Apparently the

students would create a campaign against counterfeiting in which they would create a fake Web site to tell the story of a fictional student experiencing trauma because of fake consumer goods. One goal of the effort was to mislead students not in the course into thinking that they were reading about someone real.

The article raises some good questions: Why have students perform free labor for the fashion industry (and really pay for the privilege?)? What about the underlying lies? These issues remind me of the LonleyGirl issues (there a fake videoblog lured people into what appeared to be a true personal site but was a front for a group launching a film company. Eric Goldman has a set of quick links that highlight the problems of user-generated content, ads, and quality. In general the school’s willingness to offer a class that propagates a shall we say less than authentic Web site is an example of the marketer’s will. Not that this point should exonerate the school. (Note that apparently Iowa turned down money when it was unsure about naming a school after the donor).

Still according to the article “other colleges do work with IACC” including Ohio State University but at least Ohio State does not operate in the same way as Hunter allegedly did. Ohio State seems to set up the projects as out of class activities. Hunter’s class according to some was directed by the IACC such “that the professor was required to teach only one side of the issue, had to accept industry officials watching him teach, and had little clout to fight back since he didn’t (and still doesn’t) have tenure.”

So it goes. Schools need cash and corporations have it. Would a school bow to its donors? Are schools market immune? Of course they aspire to be but the reality is different. Further as public schools lose the endowment race, they will be more and more beholden to outside funding. I am not, repeat not, saying that schools should operate so that they bow to corporate requests. I am saying that the issue is alive and well and not so easy to combat. If the allegations are true, Hunter seems to be the easy case, don’t do it. The harder ones will be the subtle questions of hiring, curriculum, and building funds which can easily look like a decision based on lack of funds when perhaps other interests scuttled the project.

Hat Tip: Slashdot

Image: Manuel Dohmen WikiCommons

License: GNU Free Documentation license, Version 1.2

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1 Response

  1. When I was in law school, I had to take a mandatory legal clinic. The subject was not of my choosing and certainly not of my inclination but, coincidently, it did match up nicely with those of my professor and the 3rd years that worked with us.which meant I paid for the privilege of helping the professor et al advance a certain viewpoint. At least Hunter is making some coin of of it – all I felt we did was advance some squishy interpretation of some federal regs.

    A larger question is: who should the schools bow to? Certainly not the faculty, I hope.