Welcome Guest Blogger Jaya Ramji-Nogales

RamjiNogales_WebPhoto.jpgI’m pleased to welcome my colleague Jaya Ramji-Nogales as a guest blogger this month.

Jaya is an Assistant Professor of Law at Temple University’s Beasley School of Law, where she teaches Civil Procedure, Evidence, Refugee Law and Policy, and Transitional Justice. Jaya received her BA with highest honors and distinction from the University of California at Berkeley; her JD from the Yale Law School; and her LLM with distinction from the Georgetown University Law Center. Before joining the Temple faculty, she taught at Georgetown both as a clinical fellow in the Center for Applied Legal Studies and as an adjunct professor, and was earlier a staff attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union in New York and an associate at the international law firm of Debevoise & Plimpton. She was also awarded the Robert L. Bernstein Fellowship in International Human Rights to create a refugee law clinic at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Prof. Ramji-Nogales’ primary research interests concern procedural due process and the intersection of immigration and international human rights law. She has also been published in the area of transitional justice. She is a regular blogger on IntLawGrrls .

You can find Jaya’s recent research on her SSRN page. Some of her recent publications include:

A Global Approach to Secret Evidence: How Human Rights Law Can Reform Our Immigration System, 39 Colum. Hum. Rts. L. Rev. ___ (forthcoming 2008).

Refugee Roulette: Disparities in Asylum Adjudication, 60 Stan. L. Rev. 295 (2007) (with A. Schoenholtz & P. Schrag).

A Collective Response to Mass Violence: Reparations and Healing in Cambodia, in Bringing the Khmer Rouge to Justice: Prosecuting Mass Violence before the Cambodian Courts (Mellen 2005) (editor, with B. Van Schaack).

Welcome, Jaya!

You may also like...

2 Responses

  1. Patrick S. O'Donnell says:

    It’s nice to see Professor Ramji-Nogales here, as she has graciously and thoughtfully replied to my (perhaps irksome) comments and queries over at IntLawGrrls. And it doesn’t hurt that she is personally and professionally involved in stuff that is (or should be) on the cutting edge of international law and politics.

  2. Patrick S. O'Donnell says:

    It’s nice to see Professor Ramji-Nogales here, as she has graciously and thoughtfully replied to my (perhaps irksome) comments and queries over at IntLawGrrls. And it doesn’t hurt that she is personally and professionally involved in stuff that is (or should be) on the cutting edge of international law and politics.