Horwitz on Sensitive Corporate Judges

Over at Prawfs, Paul Horwitz has been trying to get some precision on what it would mean for a judge to be “sensitive” to business interests.

Here is a taste:

If I were writing opinions in these [employment discrimination cases] that were “sensitive” to business, I would fully acknowledge that employees may use Title VII to try to turn garden-variety dismissals, demotions, etc. into discrimination cases, in the hope that the corporate defendant will settle after protracted litigation, and that this may ultimately drive down the incentive to hire; that class actions similarly attempt to induce settlement and may discourage innovation; and that consumer arbitration clauses are one way to efficiently channel disputes without the significant burden of litigation. But I might also “sensitively” acknowledge that proferring legitimate nondiscriminatory reasons is hardly the same thing as proving a dismissal was not, in fact, motivated by discrimination; that courts may be so tough on Title VII cases in part because they are caseload-driven; that businesses do in fact sometimes commit mass torts, and may even (at least until recently) collude in settlements that primarily serve the interests of the corporate defendant and plaintiffs’ counsel; that businesses may prefer arbitration because they think it ups their chances of success, particularly before repeat-player arbitrators, and deters consumers from pursuing their claims; and that there may be something qualitatively different between a commercial business contract and a boilerplate arbitration clause in a consumer or employment agreement. In short, I don’t know at first blush whether the corporate interest would win or lose; but I would be “sensitive” about the issues faced by business. So it doesn’t seem to me that a pro-business record of judicial rulings really tells us anything about whether that judge is sensitive to business interests. He may simply be insensitively supportive of them.

Go ahead and read the whole thing.

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